Matika Wilbur is a member of the Swinomish and Tulalip tribes of the State of Washington where she was raised in a family of commercial fishermen.
This is part two in our series For the Love of the Mauna which shares the story of Native Hawaiians’ effort to protect Mauna Kea. The first episode gave us the background and story of the beginning of the TMT fight and the cultural foundations of Mauna Kea. This segment focuses on the resistance camp at Pu’u huluhulu which was established during the summer of 2019 on the Mauna. This ended up garnering attention because it was the largest mobilization of law enforcement in the history of Hawaii to fight those trying to stop the massive destructive construction project in the middle of conservation land. We highlight the kupuna line, the complex relationship with the police, the role of the University of Hawaii, and Native peoples’ relationship with science.“The 30 meter telescope thought that they were going to erect a telescope, but really, they awoke a nation.” - Mehana KihoiCentral in the series are kapuna and scholar Dr. Auntie Noe Noe Wong-Wilson, scholar, poet, and activist; Jamaica Osorio, activist, educator, and cultural practitioner; and Lanakila Mangauil who discuss the health of the natural environment and its connection to fundamental rights as Indigenous peoples. +++All My Relations is Listener SupportedBecome a PatronFollowDr. Noe Noe Wong Wilson, Executive Director of The LĀLĀKEA FOUNDATIONJamaica Osorio on InstagramLanakila Mangauil on InstagramAll My Relations on InstagramSupporthttps://www.puuhuluhulu.com/https://www.protectmaunakea.net/donateEpisode artwork drawn by  Ciara Sana. Videography by Upthink LabsMusic by Masa KobayashiFiscal Sponsorship by Speak Out!Support the show (https://www.paypal.me/amrpodcast)Support the show (https://www.paypal.me/amrpodcast)
This special three part series  is a story about land,  culture, and connections to place—it's the story to protect Mauna Kea on the Island of Hawaii. Kanaka Maoli people have been fighting to stop the construction of the thirty meter telescope (TMT) since it's inception in 2009, and in the summer of 2019 a resistance camp at Pu’u huluhulu was established on the Mauna. Mauna Kea is the tallest mountain on earth from the sea floor to its summit. For Native Hawaiians, it is considered the most sacred, deeply honored in their creation story and time honored traditions. The destruction and ongoing desecration from tourism and the existing 13 telescopes on the Mauna has been devastating to the mountain’s fragile and unique ecosystem, and is a blatant disrespect to Kanaka cultural beliefs.In this series we’ll listen to leaders in the movement to stop TMT and protect Mauna Kea, hear the history of the illegal overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom, about the sacredness of the land, the personal power of being in the movement, and bring us up to speed on what is happening now. Central in the series are kapuna and scholar Dr. Auntie Noe Noe Wong-Wilson, scholar, poet, and activist; Jamaica Osorio, activist, educator, and cultural practitioner; and Lanakila Mangauil who discuss the health of the natural environment and its connection to fundamental rights as Indigenous peoples. This first episode gives us the background and story of the beginning of the TMT fight and the cultural foundations of Mauna Kea.  “We take care of the land because without the land we have no culture. Our culture cannot exist without these places.” - Lanakila Mangauil +++All My Relations is Listener SupportedBecome a PatronFollowDr. Noe Noe Wong Wilson, Executive Director of The LĀLĀKEA FOUNDATIONJamaica Osorio on InstagramLanakila Mangauil on InstagramAll My Relations on InstagramSupporthttps://www.puuhuluhulu.com/https://www.protectmaunakea.net/donateMusic and Ole’s"E HŌ MAI"https://www.puuhuluhulu.com/learn/protocol“Kū Haʻaheo e Kuʻu Hawaiʻi”Composed by Hinaleimoana Wong-Kalu from “Kūhaʻo Maunakea” (Kanaeokana)”@kanaeokanaInterludes byMasa Kobayashi @thefunstreetEpisode artwork inspired by the four maidens, the goddesses of the snow-covered mountains, Poliʻahu, Waiau, Kahoupokane, and Lilinoe, drawn by  Ciara Sana. Special Thanks to Josh Mori for advising us on this episode. Support the show (https://www.paypal.me/amrpodcast)
This episode talks with Wampanoag scholars Paula Peters and Linda Coombs, who tell us the real story of Thanksgiving, from an Indigenous Perspective. Thanksgiving is a time for people to come together with their families and give thanks for the blessings in their lives; but the American holiday is rooted in historical fallacy and upholds tired settler colonial belief systems. Instead, let's begin to understand the real story of Thanksgiving and the complex history undergirding this event in relation to Indigenous people. The path to reconciliation starts with honest acknowledgement of our past, with open eyes, and open hearts for a better future. It is time for us to be in good relation with one another. We can do that by learning and unlearning how to give thanks in a good way. Support Our WorkDonate To Our PatreonFollow us on InstagramShow LinksHaudenosaunee Thanksgiving AddressFrank James Full Speech (Uncensored)Full 50th Year Speeches at Cole HillMore on Paula Peters: Re-Informed Mayflower 400, Mashpee Nine, TwitterMore on Linda Coombs: Dawnland VoicesCreditsExecutive Producer, Editor, Creative Direction: Teo ShantzCo-Producer: Matika WilburJr Editing by Jon AlonsoMusic by Greg KramerSpeech captured by Sunny SinghCo-Host: Dr.Adrienne KeeneSupport the show (https://www.paypal.me/amrpodcast)
Today is Indigenous Peoples' Day, and today is a good day to talk about how we can protect and uplift our communities. One way we can do that is by voting. That is a complicated suggestion for Native America, and on this episode, we discuss why. Vote to make Indigenous voices heard. Vote because informed voting is activism. Vote for our ancestors that died for the right to do it. Vote because even though this isn’t our system, it is the system we live within. Vote for land back. Vote for Missing and Murdered Women. Vote to protect our right to choose. Vote for our bodies. Vote for critical race theory. Vote for family. Vote to take down the wall. Vote because we live in a settler colonial state, but it’s still Turtle Island.++++Special Thanks to @maxlevin for the music on this episode. Huge thanks to @teoelisio. Amazing artwork by @ciarasana. And thanks to our small powerhouse team, Will, Lindsey and @kristinbolan. Resources mentioned in the podcast:How to develop your voting plan, resources for absentee ballots, rules, and more: Votesaveamerica.com  NCAI infographic about Native voting power: http://www.ncai.org/initiatives/campaigns/NCAI_NativeVoteInfographic.pdf New podcast from NDN collective about voting: SkoVOTEDenhttps://ndncollective.org/sko-vote-den-why-voting-in-ndn-country-matters-and-a-new-podcast-hosted-jade-begay/ Info, art, and resources for Native Vote 2020:https://nativesvote2020.com/History of Native voting rights: https://vote.narf.org/  Support the show (https://www.paypal.me/amrpodcast)
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Creator Details

Episode Count
30
Podcast Count
6
Total Airtime
1 day, 3 hours
PCID
Podchaser Creator ID logo 648112