Matt Warshaw is a former professional surfer, former writer, editor at Surfer magazine. She is also the author of dozens of feature articles and large-format books on surfing culture and history.
In December of 2015, a video appeared on the Internet that stunned surfers worldwide. Titled “Kelly’s Wave,” it showed Kelly Slater—arguably the best pro surfer in history—unveiling a secret project he had been working on for more than a decade. With the help of engineers and designers, Slater had perfected the first artificial wave, created by machine in a pool, that could rival the best waves found in the ocean. “One could spend years and years surfing in the ocean,” the staff writer William Finnegan, himself a lifelong surfer, notes, “and never get a wave as good as what some people are getting here today. Ever.”    Finnegan went to visit the Kelly Slater Wave Company’s Surf Ranch—a facility in California’s Central Valley, far from the Coast—to observe a competition and test the wave for himself. (He wrote about the experience in The New Yorker.) Up until now, surfing was defined by its lack of predictability: chasing waves around the world and dealing with disappointment when they do not appear has been integral to the life of a surfer. But, with a mechanically produced, infinitely repeatable, world-class wave, surfing can become like any other sport. The professional World Surf League, which has bought a controlling interest in Slater’s company, sees a bright future.   But Finnegan wonders what it means to take surfing out of nature. Will kids master riding artificial waves without even learning to swim in the ocean? Finnegan spoke with Kelly Slater, Stephanie Gilmore (the Australian seven-time world champion), and Matt Warshaw (the closest thing surfing has to an official historian). Warshaw, like Finnegan, is skeptical about the advent of mechanical waves. Yet he admits that, when he had the chance to ride it, he didn’t ever want to stop. “It reminded me of 1986,” Warshaw recalls. “The drugs have run out, you already hate yourself—how do we get more?”   This story originally aired December 14, 2018.
Matt Warshaw is surfing's historian. He's a man who knows more about our favorite little hobby than any human alive. He's dedicated to saving its moments, preserving a rich heritage full of flawed individuals. He surfs very well, writes even better. Matt Warshaw is a man I look up to. Having him on the show has been a long time dream. I've pestered him off and on since the beginning, always hoping that something would change and force him to play along. That something was his campaign to keep the Encyclopedia of Surfing alive. A necessary fundraiser forced him to come to terms with his fear of public speaking, and I got to reap the benefits.
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Creator Details

Episode Count
2
Podcast Count
2
Total Airtime
1 hour, 57 minutes
PCID
Podchaser Creator ID logo 368725