Sarah Ballantyne Podcast Image

Sarah Ballantyne

Sarah Ballantyne, Ph.D. is the blogger behind the award-winning blog The Paleo Mom, cohost of the top-rated and syndicated "The Paleo View" podcast, and author of two upcoming books "The Paleo Approach" and "The Paleo Approach Cookbook."
Recent episodes featuring Sarah Ballantyne
Episode 380: Eating Paleo for Two
Welcome back to episode 380, where we are going to try so hard to not be the longest podcast. (0:40) For those who are listening to this in America - happy Thanksgiving! Stacy hopes that everyone had a wonderful holiday with your family. This was Sarah's first Thanksgiving as an American. Stacy saw Frozen 2 and recommends it to others; she really enjoyed it. This week's episode is about food cravings while you are pregnant.   Listener's Question Here is a question that Stacy and Sarah received that sparked the topic for this week's show (5:11): Since becoming pregnant, I have felt nauseous all day, every day, and the thought of food has been unappealing. All of my regular Paleo foods, which I loved eating before, seem revolting. I am craving food that is sweet like juice and fruit, which is not something I ate a lot of before. I also crave bread and fast food. I am loving the salty and greasy foods and so far have found Paleo substitutions, but I know that is not healthy either. Do you have any suggestions on what to do? Should I just give up the paleo lifestyle for my pregnancy and get back into it afterward? I fear to gain back the 100lbs I lost over the past two years. Thanks so much! I love your podcast it taught me all about paleo. I had no idea what it was before you guys! Stacy said kudos to this listener. Neither Stacy or Sarah were Paleo while pregnant. For Stacy, she found Paleo through a breastfeeding perspective, but not a pregnancy perspective. Stacy feels that there are things you can do to steer yourself to a healthier option. Remember, there is nothing healthy about looking back and having guilt about what you did or did not do during your pregnancies. Do not let perfection be the enemy of good. Sarah and Stacy want to talk about how you can do the best you can while maintaining quality of life. It doesn't serve us well to live with absolutes and ultimatums. Sarah brought up the way the 80/20 rule can be utilized here. In order to maintain this for the rest of your life, the goal is to make the best choice as often as you can. The goal is to maintain a healthy relationship with food, and yourself. Sarah talked about the gray area foods. When we assign intent to food it opens up the door for our food choices to be stressful. Food is meant to nourish our bodies, and our diet template should inform us as to what eating style works best for us as an individual. Sarah's goal is nutrient sufficiency, and she knows which foods her body does not tolerate. Other than avoiding foods that will make her ill, Sarah is looking at foods for their nutritional value. Thinking of diet in terms of 'what does my body need' and are my food choices meeting those needs - allows for a level of flexibility. This flexibility allows us to get away from that mindset of labeling food as good or bad and getting fanatical about the foods we are eating.   Stacy's Pregnancy Cravings Story When Stacy was pregnant, she very much craved fast food. (15:30) Food from Taco Bell with beans was the thing she craved most. While out one day, Stacy told Matt that she needed a bean burrito. Ten minutes had passed by and she still didn't have her burrito, so Stacy yelled at Matt that she was going to die and that he didn't understand what was happening. Stacy tells listeners this story to convey just how very real pregnancy cravings are. In the case of pregnancy, something happens that takes over the normal part of who you are and become intensified.   The Science There are some interesting hypotheses and bits of data that will help to explain the strong cravings that some pregnant women do have. (19:28) Between 60 and 90% of women experience a strong level of cravings. What foods women are cravings tend to be culturally influenced. Stacy and Sarah shared a bit about how their cravings varied from pregnancy to pregnancy. There was a study in Tanzania where they looked at what pregnant women were craving and found that a 1/4 was meat, a 1/4 was mangoes, a 1/5 of women craved yogurt, 1/5 craved oranges, 1/6 craved plantains. Sarah thinks that we are craving some kind of flavor experience, and culturally we have associations with that flavor experience. There are two or three plausible explanations for what is driving those cravings. One is a change in hunger hormones. It is not fully understood how a change in hunger hormones is causing cravings for specific foods. There are also changes to our taste buds that are happening during pregnancy, specifically our salt sensitivity decreases. This may explain the desire for more extreme flavors. These are often the foods that are super rewarding to the brain. Sarah explained the way that different areas of the brain connect to our senses. This area of science is all very hypothetical.   Nutritional Needs There are certain nutrients that are very important for supporting development of the fetus, so the demand for these increases while pregnant. (29:05) When we are in a place where we are eating a relatively healthy diet, and we are better able to eat intuitively, we will naturally crave these nutrient-dense foods in pregnancy. For people who can't eat intuitively, they just tend to crave food. Calcium and magnesium deficiencies can manifest as sugar cravings. In pregnancy, we don't understand a direct one-to-one correspondence. Folate is needed from very early on in pregnancy to support healthy neural tube development in a fetus’s brain and spinal cord. The recommended intake for pregnant women (as well as women planning to conceive) is 600 to 800 mcg daily, and the best sources are leafy green vegetables, asparagus, broccoli, avocados, nuts, seeds, beets, cauliflower, and squash. Vitamin A is vital for embryonic development, including the growth of the eyes, heart, lungs, kidneys, central nervous system, respiratory system, and circulatory system. It is best to meet your Vitamin A requirements from animal foods. Vitamin D plays a critical role in facilitating calcium absorption, metabolism, and immune function. Calcium is needed for skeletal development, blood pressure regulation, and proper muscle and nerve functioning, and it becomes particularly important for the fetus during third-trimester bone development. The best Paleo-friendly sources are leafy green vegetables, broccoli, small bone-in fish like sardines, and grass-fed dairy. There are easy tricks you can do to increase your calcium intake. Choline is important for the development of the fetal nervous system, neural tube, and brain. Pregnant women should consume at least 450 milligrams per day. The richest sources are egg yolks, liver, shrimp, and beef. Iron is needed for a fetus’s rapidly developing blood supply and for the expanding blood supply of the mother. For pregnant women, 27 milligrams daily is recommended. The best sources are red meat, organ meat, and leafy green vegetables. Zinc is used for fetal cell growth, as well as supporting immunity, enzyme production, and insulin production in the mother. Pregnant women should aim for 11 milligrams per day from rich sources like beef, pork, poultry, seafood (especially oysters), nuts, and seeds. Although there aren’t clearly established omega-3 requirements for pregnant women, essential fatty acids are recommended. The best sources being low-mercury fatty fish and other seafood, walnuts, and omega-3–enriched eggs. When it comes to quality seafood sources, Sarah referred listeners to check out this podcast episode.   The Bigger Picture Sarah feels that the primary criteria for diet, in general, is nutrient sufficiency. (44:29) You should get the full complement of essential and non-essential nutrients in adequate and synergistic quantities. The more nutrient-dense foods we choose, the more wiggle room we earn for ourselves in suboptimal choices. Sarah feels that it is ok to honor your cravings. Make intentional choices when we are not being driven by these cravings to do our best to meet the nutritional needs of our pregnant bodies right now. Remember that the lifestyle aspects impact cravings as well. Meeting nutritional needs (and lifestyle!) during pregnancy is more important than what dietary framework you follow. Nutrient sufficiency is important, but so is your relationship with food. Absolutes are not the only way to navigate pregnancy cravings and aversions. Stacy pointed out the role that nutrient absorption plays with cravings. Probiotics have significantly helped with Stacy's cravings. Talk to a medical professional when supplementing your diet.   Closing Thoughts Thank you so much for tuning in and listening! (53:08)  If you know someone who is pregnant or thinking about getting pregnant that would appreciate this show, please share it with them. Please also leave a review as this helps others find this show. Thank you so much for your support listeners! As the decade is ending, Stacy has been doing a lot of reflecting and hopes that others are using this time to look back and also look ahead at what you want for the next decade. Thank you for being here! Stacy and Sarah will be back next week! (55:37)
Episode 380: Eating Paleo for Two
Welcome back to episode 380, where we are going to try so hard to not be the longest podcast. (0:40) For those who are listening to this in America - happy Thanksgiving! Stacy hopes that everyone had a wonderful holiday with your family. This was Sarah's first Thanksgiving as an American. Stacy saw Frozen 2 and recommends it to others; she really enjoyed it. This week's episode is about food cravings while you are pregnant.   Listener's Question Here is a question that Stacy and Sarah received that sparked the topic for this week's show (5:11): Since becoming pregnant, I have felt nauseous all day, every day, and the thought of food has been unappealing. All of my regular Paleo foods, which I loved eating before, seem revolting. I am craving food that is sweet like juice and fruit, which is not something I ate a lot of before. I also crave bread and fast food. I am loving the salty and greasy foods and so far have found Paleo substitutions, but I know that is not healthy either. Do you have any suggestions on what to do? Should I just give up the paleo lifestyle for my pregnancy and get back into it afterward? I fear to gain back the 100lbs I lost over the past two years. Thanks so much! I love your podcast it taught me all about paleo. I had no idea what it was before you guys! Stacy said kudos to this listener. Neither Stacy or Sarah were Paleo while pregnant. For Stacy, she found Paleo through a breastfeeding perspective, but not a pregnancy perspective. Stacy feels that there are things you can do to steer yourself to a healthier option. Remember, there is nothing healthy about looking back and having guilt about what you did or did not do during your pregnancies. Do not let perfection be the enemy of good. Sarah and Stacy want to talk about how you can do the best you can while maintaining quality of life. It doesn't serve us well to live with absolutes and ultimatums. Sarah brought up the way the 80/20 rule can be utilized here. In order to maintain this for the rest of your life, the goal is to make the best choice as often as you can. The goal is to maintain a healthy relationship with food, and yourself. Sarah talked about the gray area foods. When we assign intent to food it opens up the door for our food choices to be stressful. Food is meant to nourish our bodies, and our diet template should inform us as to what eating style works best for us as an individual. Sarah's goal is nutrient sufficiency, and she knows which foods her body does not tolerate. Other than avoiding foods that will make her ill, Sarah is looking at foods for their nutritional value. Thinking of diet in terms of 'what does my body need' and are my food choices meeting those needs - allows for a level of flexibility. This flexibility allows us to get away from that mindset of labeling food as good or bad and getting fanatical about the foods we are eating.   Stacy's Pregnancy Cravings Story When Stacy was pregnant, she very much craved fast food. (15:30) Food from Taco Bell with beans was the thing she craved most. While out one day, Stacy told Matt that she needed a bean burrito. Ten minutes had passed by and she still didn't have her burrito, so Stacy yelled at Matt that she was going to die and that he didn't understand what was happening. Stacy tells listeners this story to convey just how very real pregnancy cravings are. In the case of pregnancy, something happens that takes over the normal part of who you are and become intensified.   The Science There are some interesting hypotheses and bits of data that will help to explain the strong cravings that some pregnant women do have. (19:28) Between 60 and 90% of women experience a strong level of cravings. What foods women are cravings tend to be culturally influenced. Stacy and Sarah shared a bit about how their cravings varied from pregnancy to pregnancy. There was a study in Tanzania where they looked at what pregnant women were craving and found that a 1/4 was meat, a 1/4 was mangoes, a 1/5 of women craved yogurt, 1/5 craved oranges, 1/6 craved plantains. Sarah thinks that we are craving some kind of flavor experience, and culturally we have associations with that flavor experience. There are two or three plausible explanations for what is driving those cravings. One is a change in hunger hormones. It is not fully understood how a change in hunger hormones is causing cravings for specific foods. There are also changes to our taste buds that are happening during pregnancy, specifically our salt sensitivity decreases. This may explain the desire for more extreme flavors. These are often the foods that are super rewarding to the brain. Sarah explained the way that different areas of the brain connect to our senses. This area of science is all very hypothetical.   Nutritional Needs There are certain nutrients that are very important for supporting development of the fetus, so the demand for these increases while pregnant. (29:05) When we are in a place where we are eating a relatively healthy diet, and we are better able to eat intuitively, we will naturally crave these nutrient-dense foods in pregnancy. For people who can't eat intuitively, they just tend to crave food. Calcium and magnesium deficiencies can manifest as sugar cravings. In pregnancy, we don't understand a direct one-to-one correspondence. Folate is needed from very early on in pregnancy to support healthy neural tube development in a fetus’s brain and spinal cord. The recommended intake for pregnant women (as well as women planning to conceive) is 600 to 800 mcg daily, and the best sources are leafy green vegetables, asparagus, broccoli, avocados, nuts, seeds, beets, cauliflower, and squash. Vitamin A is vital for embryonic development, including the growth of the eyes, heart, lungs, kidneys, central nervous system, respiratory system, and circulatory system. It is best to meet your Vitamin A requirements from animal foods. Vitamin D plays a critical role in facilitating calcium absorption, metabolism, and immune function. Calcium is needed for skeletal development, blood pressure regulation, and proper muscle and nerve functioning, and it becomes particularly important for the fetus during third-trimester bone development. The best Paleo-friendly sources are leafy green vegetables, broccoli, small bone-in fish like sardines, and grass-fed dairy. There are easy tricks you can do to increase your calcium intake. Choline is important for the development of the fetal nervous system, neural tube, and brain. Pregnant women should consume at least 450 milligrams per day. The richest sources are egg yolks, liver, shrimp, and beef. Iron is needed for a fetus’s rapidly developing blood supply and for the expanding blood supply of the mother. For pregnant women, 27 milligrams daily is recommended. The best sources are red meat, organ meat, and leafy green vegetables. Zinc is used for fetal cell growth, as well as supporting immunity, enzyme production, and insulin production in the mother. Pregnant women should aim for 11 milligrams per day from rich sources like beef, pork, poultry, seafood (especially oysters), nuts, and seeds. Although there aren’t clearly established omega-3 requirements for pregnant women, essential fatty acids are recommended. The best sources being low-mercury fatty fish and other seafood, walnuts, and omega-3–enriched eggs. When it comes to quality seafood sources, Sarah referred listeners to check out this podcast episode.   The Bigger Picture Sarah feels that the primary criteria for diet, in general, is nutrient sufficiency. (44:29) You should get the full complement of essential and non-essential nutrients in adequate and synergistic quantities. The more nutrient-dense foods we choose, the more wiggle room we earn for ourselves in suboptimal choices. Sarah feels that it is ok to honor your cravings. Make intentional choices when we are not being driven by these cravings to do our best to meet the nutritional needs of our pregnant bodies right now. Remember that the lifestyle aspects impact cravings as well. Meeting nutritional needs (and lifestyle!) during pregnancy is more important than what dietary framework you follow. Nutrient sufficiency is important, but so is your relationship with food. Absolutes are not the only way to navigate pregnancy cravings and aversions. Stacy pointed out the role that nutrient absorption plays with cravings. Probiotics have significantly helped with Stacy's cravings. Talk to a medical professional when supplementing your diet.   Closing Thoughts Thank you so much for tuning in and listening! (53:08)  If you know someone who is pregnant or thinking about getting pregnant that would appreciate this show, please share it with them. Please also leave a review as this helps others find this show. Thank you so much for your support listeners! As the decade is ending, Stacy has been doing a lot of reflecting and hopes that others are using this time to look back and also look ahead at what you want for the next decade. Thank you for being here! Stacy and Sarah will be back next week! (55:37)
Episode 379: Let's Talk About Coffee
Stacy and Sarah are back again, with Sarah leading the charge this week. (0:40) Sarah likes to think of last week's episode as a hodgepodge. When Stacy structured last week's episode she wanted it to be a catch-up show that was worth listeners' time, and she hopes everyone enjoyed it! This week's episode is about coffee. Coffee has come up in probably half of the episodes because Stacy and Sarah so commonly receive questions around that topic. Before diving in, Stacy thanked this week's sponsor, Clean Coffee Company. This brand is both delicious and goes above and beyond when it comes to ensuring that their beans are toxin-free. You can use the code '15paleoview' at this link to receive 15% off your order. On this episode, Stacy and Sarah are going to talk a lot about the research from the last couple of years looking at the effects of coffee, and overall the data has been mixed. There is a thought throughout a number of studies that the potential concerns for some people for coffee consumption have to do with coffee quality. Quality is very important for a number of reasons, which is why Sarah has fallen in love with Clean Coffee Co. Sarah fell in love with the flavor of their coffee first, and their practices around the quality testing second. It is very impressive how controlled and clean it is. It is very important to source a coffee that is being very transparent about their farming practices.   The Science To Sarah coffee is a hot topic. It is the second most consumed beverage after water. Coffee is a major trade commodity as well. There have been a lot of news stories highlighting the way science has flip-flopped on whether coffee is good or bad for you. (10:02) These discussions have used this situation to say that scientists don't really know what they are talking about. Sarah shared on the communication challenge between academic labs and media outlets. The scientific consensus is an important piece to understand in this all. With coffee, there have been a number of really well done, big studies, meta-analysis, that have reached scientific consensus. In the last couple of decades leading up to this point, the media has oversimplified the findings from these studies. The way these studies were shared did not accurately share how science is done. Coffee does have some really exciting health benefits for most people. There are over 800 phytochemicals in coffee. There are also a number of antioxidants that have a variety of important properties. Coffee also contains some unique fiber types. There is half a gram of fiber per cup of coffee. There are two types of fiber present, and studies have shown that these two types increase levels of Bifidobacteria.  These fibers also reduce the growth of problematic E. coli and Clostridium species. They help with the production of short-chain fatty acids. There have been some exciting studies looking at the application of coffee in terms of the gut microbiome. There was one study, in particular, looking at why coffee might reduce diabetes risk. The study showed that coffee consumption was able to prevent diet-related changes to the gut microbiome.   Breaking It Down Further Chlorogenic acids (CGAs) are compounds known as the most potent antioxidants found in coffee. (20:15) CGAs are believed to be a major contributor to coffee’s health effects, with the proposed mechanism being CGA impacts cell signaling pathways that contribute to the onset of degenerative diseases. There have been some interesting studies showing that CGAs help us metabolize different toxins and they impact our blot clotting. Polyphenols change the composition of the gut microbiome in a good way; they suppress the growth of pathogens while increasing the growth of probiotics. Coffee has a triple whammy in terms of the gut microbiome. It is both the unique fiber in coffee, as well as these polyphenols that are benefiting gut microbiome composition. Another important compound in coffee is Trigonelline. (22:33) This compound is known to be hypoglycemic, neuroprotective, protect against cancer, impact estrogen levels, and it has some antibacterial properties as well. Coffee beverages are one of the only sources of melanoidins in the human diet. These compounds act similarly to dietary fiber without actually being fiber. Research shows that the amount of coffee melanoidins that reach the colon with heavy coffee consumption is one of the proposed mechanisms for coffee’s anti-colorectal cancer effects. Sarah shared a bit on the science behind why coffee is often viewed as a laxative.   The Other Side Not all phytochemicals are linked with only health benefits. (25:49) There are a couple that have potential cholesterol-raising properties. It is interesting because they have anti-cancer effects, while also potentially raising cholesterol. Sarah shared an example of how broccoli has a similar situation with its phytochemicals and the cost-benefit analysis.   The Health Benefits of Coffee This is where the landmark studies have solidified coffee as a health-promoting beverage for most people. (28:28) Two huge meta-analyses that were published two years ago showed a huge reduction in all-cause mortality from coffee consumption. Sarah explained all-cause mortality in greater detail. The optimal dose of coffee in one of the studies Sarah explained was found to be three cups of coffee per day. Three cups of coffee (8 oz.) per day reduced the risk of all-cause mortality by 17%. The study found that it didn't matter if the coffee was caffeinated or decaf. With some of the other health benefits of coffee, the caffeine aspect does matter, but the big picture study showed that decaffeinated was almost as good as caffeinated. This implies that it is the fiber and the phytonutrients and not the caffeine in the coffee that is having the impact. This is also another strong argument for seeking high-quality coffee. There is a reduction in deaths from cardiovascular disease (19% risk reduction), coronary heart disease (16% risk reduction), and strokes (30% risk reduction). These studies are again looking at people who are drinking three cups of coffee a day. While increasing consumption above three cups doesn’t increase harm, it doesn’t show much benefit, either. Importantly, women seem to benefit more than men here. There is also an impact of caffeine on blood pressure. (37:25) When you have a caffeinated beverage your blood pressure goes up, which is an excepted risk factor of cardiovascular disease. This seems counterintuitive and is still an unanswered question in this entire field of research. Stacy shared a bit about how interesting this is because the way people's reactions to consuming coffee vary so much from person to person. Sarah touched a bit on energy dips and what causes them. Energy dips in the afternoon are not normal and are a sign that something could be improved upon in terms of lifestyle. Stacy noted that this is a good thing to keep an eye on. These are triggers when your body is trying to communicate a message.   More on the Health Benefits Drinking coffee reduces the risk of type-2 diabetes by 30%. (44:44) This is another effect that is seen in both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee consumption. Coffee can also reduce the risk of other metabolic diseases. Specific to caffeinated coffee, there is a decrease in the risk of neurological diseases. The biggest body of scientific literature is with Parkinson’s disease, showing that coffee consumption reduces the risk of Parkinson’s. Emerging evidence is showing that it can reduce the risk of depression and other cognitive disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease. Caffeine increases blood circulation to the brain. Coffee seems like it could be good for the liver as well. Studies have found a reduced risk for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (29% reduction), liver fibrosis (27% reduction), and cirrhosis (39% reduction). All of these findings were with high consumption or having one extra cup per day. Coffee also helps with gallbladder health, as high consumers (2-6 cups a day) have a lower risk for gallstone disease. There is a strong relationship between coffee consumption and reduced cancer risk. Generally, there is about an 18% reduction in the chances of being diagnosed with cancer in high coffee drinkers. Researchers have found a lower risk of prostate cancer, endometrial cancer, melanoma, oral cancer, leukemia, non-melanoma skin cancer, and liver cancer. There is some increased risk with high consumption and certain cancers, specifically lung cancer. This detail is dependent on smoking status. Taken all together, we are seeing some really impressive health benefits to regular coffee consumption. (49:16) Most of those effects are optimized at two to three cups a day.   The Caveats It is important to recognize that coffee does not work for everybody. There are some people who would do better to look at other hot beverages. People with familial hypercholesterolemia should avoid coffee.  With high cholesterol, it is worth experimenting with your coffee intake. If you are under chronic stress and your cortisol is elevated in the morning, adding a caffeine stimulus to the equation is not going to be beneficial. When cortisol is not high in the morning, then coffee may be a good stimulus. If you have difficulty managing stress as it is, caffeine is not helpful to you. When you have issues with cortisol timing throughout the day, it is worthwhile doing a salivary cortisol panel. Drinking coffee slightly increases our chance of developing gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD or “acid reflux). Although, you could simply find a coffee with lower acid levels. Sarah explained genes that regulate coffee metabolism and the way this varies from one person to the next. (54:57) There is some evidence that higher caffeine consumption can increase anxiety. Be aware of this and talk to a doctor about it if you are experiencing this symptom. Coffee itself if generally anti-inflammatory. There are lots of anti-inflammatory antioxidants in coffee. However, there are also a couple of phytochemicals that may increase inflammation. Especially in a low-quality coffee, these inflammatory phytochemicals would be higher. The findings in this research are mixed, so coffee is still eliminated initially on the AIP. Coffee is a phase one reintroduction because for some it is beneficial and anti-inflammatory. Talk to your doctor if you have a health condition that might mean that high coffee consumption or high caffeine consumption are not going to benefit you. Also, be critical in your self-reflection.   Closing Thoughts Overall the scientific literature shows that the vast majority of us can benefit from two to three cups of coffee a day. Especially when the coffee is a high-quality coffee. There is not a one size fits all approach. Engage with functional integrative medicine and be critical with self-experimentation. Be willing to re-evaluate when things are not working for you. This is one of those areas where Stacy and Sarah recommend that you be self-reflective. Stacy and Sarah shared details on how they prefer their coffee. Stacy shared a bit more on the way different styles of coffee (ex: shot of espresso vs. brewed) metabolizes differently. Espresso actually has higher antioxidants and lower caffeine because it is hot water pressed through the grounds at high pressure. Americanos have less caffeine than brewed coffee. With cold-brew you are going to miss some of the antioxidants, but you will have lower acidity and lower caffeine. Be sure to follow the instructions for coffee concentrates. Just like with anything else, it is important to listen to your body. Thank you so much for tuning in to this week's show! And a huge thank you again to this week's sponsor, Clean Coffee Company. Don't forget, you can use the code '15paleoview' at this link to receive 15% off your order. Thank you for tuning in! Stacy and Sarah will be back again next week. If you are tuning in late, Stacy wishes everyone a wonderful Thanksgiving! (1:10:16)
Episode 378: Did you know? (Current Events)
Welcome back to The Paleo View - episode 378. (0:40) Today Stacy and Sarah plan to talk about some current events. Stacy wanted to take a moment to thank the imperfect Skype for being there for 378 episodes. Before jumping in, Stacy shared a side tangent on a podcast Matt has taken to listening to with the boys, where they use the show to read funny reviews. Sarah shared some thoughts on the proper use of puns. This show is Stacy's fault. Sarah has a lot going on and is about to travel, so Stacy decided to take the reins. Stacy and Sarah are both going to share about what they have going on, and things that are going on in the world that is interesting and fun to explore. It is almost like rapid-fire, but The Paleo View style banter that is not at all fast.   Sarah's Updates Sarah is leaving for San Francisco the morning after this episode is recorded, and by the time this show airs she will be back home. She will be giving a public lecture on the gut microbiome for Cider Health Care Systems Institute of Health and Healing. Sarah thinks she overcommitted with her travel itinerary this year. At the start of 2020, Sarah is also doing a three-day workshop in San Jose, CA in February. In the midst of this all, Sarah is still trying to wrap up her Gut Microbiome book. There are still some tickets left for the San Jose workshop, so if you are interested, you can purchase those here. This will be the last trip Sarah will plan for awhile. Eventually, when the book releases, there will be a book tour, with very limited stops. The next section of the AIP lecture series is coming up in March, but Sarah wants to make time for even more projects that excite her. Even though Sarah loves public speaking, it is not a smart use of her time right now. Stacy stressed the importance that we all need to prioritize the things that make us feel our best. It was a difficult decision for Sarah to make to not attend Paleo Fx in 2020. Sarah shared the way that she got crystal clear about her expectations and goals, and is aligning with those. For the first time in a long time, Sarah feels optimistic about the way she is structuring her time. Stacy feels like healthy living is all about constant reevaluations. It is a process of constant learning and evolution.   Stacy's Updates For today's 'did you know' episode Stacy is going to share on a new bill for preventing greenwashing on personal care products. Stacy referred to this previous podcast episode when they discussed personal product care safety act. Stacy recently went to California for more training on this, as this is her full-time job. She specifically works with BeautyCounter, but she also works with a lot of other brands who are things safer. If you have any questions about all of that stuff, this is where Stacy has gone with her lifestyle and her expanding journey. If you want to try safer samples or anything, Stacy does offer those. Just send Stacy an email at stacy@realeverything.com and put in the subject, 'BeautyCounter sample'. Be sure to include details on what you are currently using and what your goals are. Stacy loves to troubleshoot with people both on skincare and lifestyle. Sarah and Stacy discussed their love for the Overnight Resurfacing Peel, which you can still get for free in the month of November. If you are loving BeautyCounter, there is a half-price enrollment special through the 17th. Sarah's birthday will be taking place when this show airs. In honor of her recent 8th blogiversary celebration, Sarah wrote a post about her personal journey as a blogger. Sarah reflected on the journey Stacy and Sarah have been on together since this podcast launched. They have both been able to find their voices in the community and the change they want to affect in the world. One of the things that amaze Sarah about Stacy's journey is that she has been able to channel her passion for healthy living in a way that impacts people whether they are Paleo or not. The work Stacy is doing is not just about BeautyCounter, it is about the regulations that go into personal care products. It has been a journey for Stacy.   The Personal Care Product Industry Stacy does want to take a moment to discuss where the personal care industry is. People have this idea that natural is safe. Stacy has been diving into the science and explanation for years now so that she could be a leading voice in the personal care products conversation. This second bill won't go to committee until they want to spend the resources for a committee to look into it. The Personal Care Safety Product Act has some interesting components to it and Stacy shared more on why companies are lobbying hard around this one. Stacy thinks the Natural Cosmetics Act will go through faster, even though the other one has been around longer. The second one only seeks to define what terms mean. This one is sponsored by representative Sean Maloney from New York. Stacy read a press release more on this act, which you can read in full here. Sarah and Stacy discussed their concerns around the way in which we breathe in and absorb (through the skin) the toxic ingredients in the products we use. Stacy's passion is to educate people on the reality that you cannot trust the labels you read. What you can do is scan products in your own house, or products you are considering buying, using the app EWG. If these bills go through, it is a lot less of a burden to the consumer since you won't have to do all this research. The Personal Care Product Safety Act's goal is to strengthen human health by testing the ingredients. If you are interested in asking your representatives to support either of these bipartisan bills, BeautyCounter has created a textbot to help you do this. Text 'BETTERBEAUTY' to 528886.   The Clean Fifteen & Dirty Dozen Stacy asked Sarah if she knew that the Dirty Dozen and Clean Fifteen changes every year. Sarah noted that these lists also look at trends and the types of foods that make it onto the list frequently. EWG does a great job of empowering people with knowledge. Sarah feels that they have a balanced approach to their feedback and recommendations. This year's clean fifteen includes: Avocados, Sweet Corn, Pineapple, Sweet Peas frozen, onions, papaya, eggplants, asparagus, kiwis, cauliflower, cantaloupes, broccoli, mushrooms, honeydew melon This year's dirty dozen includes: strawberries, spinach, kale, nectarines, apples, grapes, peaches, cherries, pears, tomatoes, celery, potato, + hot peppers Just because something isn't classified as organic, it doesn't mean that the farmer didn't use a variation of safety practices. Be sure to ask your local farmers about their practices.   Perfume Did you know that there is now an EWG verified perfume? The company is called Henry Rose. There are five perfumes and they are fragrance-free.   Solar Panels Did you know that there is a 30% tax credit for the installation of solar power on your home? Sarah did know this because her family has been going through a big shift at home to swap to more earth-friendly practices. Sarah does want to make the switch, but the timing isn't right for her household just yet. Matt has been doing the research on this as they prepare to move to a new house. Switching to solar will save you $400 per kilowatt per year; an average 5KW system will save a homeowner $2000/year.  Sarah and her husband are looking at possibly moving, so they aren't sure if investing in the solar panels makes the most sense. Stacy referred listeners to this podcast episode for more information on Sarah and Stacy's earth-friendly practices.   Climate Trends Stacy asked Sarah if she knew that September 2019 was earth's hottest month ever, specifically North Ameria. On July 31, Greenland lost eleven billion tons of ice. A lot of this goes back to why Stacy and Sarah make the choices they do, with the goal to lower their carbon footprint. Sarah's family has the mantra, 'but the planet' and she shared on how this mindset has impacted her lifestyle and family's choices. Branch Basics is a product that Stacy and Sarah both cannot say enough good things about. You can use the code 'ThePaleoView' to get 20% off your Branch Basics set orders.   Black Friday A lot of Stacy and Sarah's favorite brands will be running Black Friday sales, and they will be telling people all about their favorites. Simply subscribe to their newsletters to catch those details. Stacy is offering an exclusive special that only she is offering with BeautyCounter. To subscribe to Sarah's, visit this link. To subscribe to Stacy's, visit this link.   Family-Friendly Shows Did you know that there are a lot of family-friendly shows that help educate about topics like food, health and more? Below is a list of Stacy's recommended shows: Planet Earth, Netflix Rotten, Netflix Explained, Netflix Diagnosis, Netflix Food, Delicious Science, Netflix The Paleo Way, Netflix Final Table, Netflix Nile Red, YouTube NOVA, PBS Queer Eye Great British Baking Show   Closing Thoughts Stacy and Sarah hope you enjoyed this week's episode. If you have suggested topics or questions please be sure to do that by using the contact forms on both Stacy and Sarah's sites. Stacy wants Sarah to cover one of her questions - why do we not feel good after we travel? Again, Stacy and Sarah love hearing from you, so don't hesitate to reach out! The contact forms on the site are the best ways to touch base, but social media works if you need to use those channels instead. Thanks for listening - Stacy and Sarah will be back next week!
Episode 377: Common Misconceptions about the AIP
Welcome back, listeners. (0:40) Stacy has some good news to share. Wesley is no longer vegan. He lasted three days, and Stacy is super proud of him pursuing something he was interested in trying. Stacy wanted to give a special shout out to the vegan podcast listeners who reached out and were super helpful and supportive. Stacy shared more on Wesley's experiment, how he brought it to a close, and why. This week Stacy and Sarah are going to go in a completely different direction. Sarah wanted to revisit the autoimmune protocol as a dedicated topic for a few reasons. It is exciting for Sarah to see the way that AIP is evolving. However, there are some things happening that are misrepresenting what AIP is.   A Preview Into this Episode In this week's show, Sarah wants to revisit what AIP is and summarize it's main principles. She also wants to address some of the most common misconceptions. (11:46) The autoimmune protocol is a very comprehensive protocol, and every facet is backed up by a huge body of scientific literature. It is important for Sarah to understand the why's behind which foods to eat, and which foods to eliminate, and the lifestyle priorities in order to personalize AIP and use it effectively. This week's episode is going to be very much a summary of what the autoimmune protocol is and what it isn't. Stacy has been excited to see the way that AIP has moved outside of the Paleo community and has reached more people, providing help to those who need it. However, Stacy recognizes where the trouble lies with the misconceptions that have also spread as the popularity of AIP has grown. There are some cases where AIP is being used as a form of disordered eating. Stacy reminded listeners that AIP is not intended to be a life sentence. For some people, there may be foods that you can never add back. There are people who use AIP for a set amount of time and fully hit their health goals and reintroduce with success. Stacy and Sarah want AIP to be a mechanism for people to reach the next level in their health, but to not cause stress in the process.   The Three Phases The AIP is actually three phases, which have been outlined on Sarah's site here. (19:09) The first phase is the elimination phase, but Sarah really thinks of this as the nutrient density phase. Placing a positive focus on what to eat is an important way to practice a positive mindset. Sarah has always resisted putting a timeframe on the elimination phase because different people have different barriers to overcome. Food needs to be eliminated for at least two weeks for the elimination process to be effective in showing food intolerances. In the AIP lecture series, Sarah teaches that if you aren't seeing any changes within three months during the elimination phase, there is more to look into beyond diet. Refer to this do's and don'ts post on Sarah's site for more tips and tricks. The reintroduction phase is important for a number of reasons. The elimination phase of the AIP is a challenge outside of the home, and reintroductions allow expansions on the diet, which makes practical challenges navigatable. There are some nutrients that you have to be aware of so that you make sure you are getting all the nutrients you need during the elimination phase. So reintroduction can make the diet higher quality when those nutrient-dense foods that were eliminated are actually tolerated. The foods that are eliminated on the AIP are not going to be a problem for everybody. Autoimmune disease is a spectrum. Other than celiac and gluten, there are not defined food triggers. For most autoimmune diseases it is a confluence of events. (28:18) This is why the AIP is this very comprehensive approach because it is trying to tackle a large number of things. Reintroduction allows you to identify how different foods make you feel and if/when/how to include them (or not) into your diet. One of the things that happen during the reintroduction phase is that you are learning about your body and you are personalizing the AIP to your body's requirements and tolerance. After that second phase, you reach the third phase, known as the maintenance phase. Dropping the dogma of good food and bad food allows you to hone in on an individual approach that is really only possible after going through this methodical and personal journey. The troubleshooting that happens during this process is also hugely informative. If you aren't seeing changes by that three-month mark find a functional medicine specialist and start digging deeper because there are other things that could be going on. There is a learning environment that comes with the autoimmune protocol. This is why Sarah likes to think about it as a toolkit; it provides you with a knowledge base. This is a very empowering journey!   The AIP Bullet Points The AIP is based on a huge body of scientific evidence that supports each facet. High vegetable consumption is super important. Organ meat and seafood are the most nutrient-dense foods available. Balanced macros are really important for hormone regulation and immune regulation. That the foods being eaten are really important for gut health, but so are the lifestyle factors. Regulating the immune system is not just about regulating the immune cellular function, it is about taking care of all of the inputs to gut health. The AIP embraces functional medicine and treatments backed by science. The goal is to combine all of the best tools that are backed by science, in a personal way to best effect our individual health. The sense of empowerment really hit home for Stacy and she shared more on why. (37:01) Stacy shared more on her lifestyle and how and why she has tailored it to her personal needs in the way that she has. Learning to understand her triggers was a viral part of Stacy's journey. Knowing where her triggers lie allows Stacy to live her life to the fullest, and it is truly worth it.   The Mindset Aspect You do have the room to make choices personal to you and your needs. Sarah shared more on how this would work, using the example of coffee. Get into the why's behind what to eat and what not to eat because this knowledge allows you to see what trades you can make to maintain a healthier mindset during your elimination phase. Learning to see AIP within the context of the bigger picture, allows you to truly understand your body with the goal of lifelong health at the forefront of your journey. The resources Sarah referred listeners to: the AIP lecture series, The Paleo Approach book, The Autoimmune Book protocol eBook, autoimmune protocol start here page. Sarah noted that you can also work one-on-one with an AIP certified coach or join a group coaching program. The biggest mindset challenges can be easily overcome with knowledge. Stacy reminded listeners that food can make you feel bad, but the food is not bad. And you are not bad for making a choice. These are things that Stacy didn't understand years ago. It took her time to develop a healthy mindset, as she use to think that weight loss was health. Understanding an autoimmune condition and learning to nourish your body and live a lifestyle that helps you feel its best, is really the best way to change the way that you think about health.   Is the AIP for everyone? You can use the same structure without doing all of the eliminations. (52:41) If you don't have an autoimmune disease, you can still do this same health approach within a Paleo template. You could follow a standard Paleo approach and then test your tolerance to the possibly problematic foods, such as dairy. There are a lot of people who have been a part of the Paleo community for a long time, eating a nutrient-focused, gluten-free diet. You can adapt the structure of the healing journey to be in a different starting place and to have a different health goal. You would still use the same overall idea behind a challenge and a reintroduction, with the goal of understanding your body.   Common Misconceptions Myth: There is no science to support this way of life.  Fact: Sarah cited 1200 studies when writing The Paleo Approach. There have been 600 to 800 more studies that have come into various writings on Sarah's website. There are also now some clinical studies that are looking at IBS and Hashimotos Thyroiditis. In addition, there is an ongoing study right now on eczema and psoriasis. There is no aspect of the autoimmune protocol that is not solidly rooted in scientific evidence. Sarah approaches every recommendation she makes in scientific research. Stacy referred listeners to this podcast episode where this was discussed in greater detail.    Myth: If I do AIP, it is going to solve all my problems. No. You simply can't cure everything with diet and lifestyle alone. There are situations where you need doctors, medicine, surgeries, supplements, therapies, etc. AIP is a toolbox. It is a collection of best practices. Sarah will take thyroid hormone replacement for her entire life. And this is not her failure or a failure of AIP.   Myth: It's just a diet. (1:00:14) The dietary aspect is where people come into AIP. It is easy to ignore the lifestyle aspects, but these are critical components. When we get fixated on the dietary piece, it is easy to lose sight of the lifestyle pieces.   Myth: If I am doing all the things, I don't need medical intervention.  This might be true for some people, but not true for all people. There are going to be things that diet and lifestyle alone will not address. Sarah would refer these people back to this podcast episode as both of these approaches will help you dig deeper into the healing protocol. It is not just important to see your doctor, but to also tell them what you are doing. If you are toying with supplements or hoping to go off medications, it is important to work with a medical professional you trust.   Myth: It causes food sensitivities. Sarah explained how the reaction was always there, and understands how frustrating this can be. It is inconvenient to discover you have a food sensitivity. However, there is a lot of empowerment that comes from that knowledge. It may feel that way because of the unmasking of a reaction that has always been there before, but physiologically that is not how it works.  Refer to this podcast episode for more information on this topic.    Myth: AIP is a very limiting diet.  There are examples of people who keep it very limited due to food phobia.  Stacy has seen people do this when people combine AIP with low-carb.  Sarah noted that if you are combining protocols you need to be aware of how to get sufficient nutrients, and should probably be working with an AIP certified coach or functional medicine practitioner.  If you are giving up a lot of foods that you typically eat, it can feel like there is nothing left to eat.  Sarah approaches this by teaching people about the food variety people have to choose from, because variety is actually a big part of the AIP.  The mindset aspect that comes with seeking the abundance as opposed to focusing on the eliminations.  The food lists that Sarah has in her books has a few thousand options listed.  It does require trying a lot of new foods, finding different places to shop, learning to cook with new foods, but these are different challenges than a diet being too restrictive.    Closing Thoughts The AIP is not a very restrictive diet. It has eliminations, which might be more than you have ever tried before, but it incorporates a huge variety of foods and promotes variety within the template.  There are so many options that are AIP complaint for you if you don't want to make your own foods. There are more AIP friendly food options available now today than ever before. Stacy and Sarah appreciate you the listeners for being here for this episode.  Please go leave a review on the show, in whatever platform you are listening to it in. Thank you so much for being here and for supporting this show! (1:17:25)
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Stats
Location
Atlanta, GA, USA
Episode Count
428
Podcast Count
23
Total Airtime
2 weeks, 2 days