Tony Loyd Podcast Image

Tony Loyd

Tony Loyd is a keynote speaker, radio host, and best-selling author of Crazy Good Advice, helps people launch and scale social enterprises and host Social Entrepreneur Podcast.
Recent episodes featuring Tony Loyd
Cohort Opportunity at Lunar Startups, with Amanda Heyman and Danielle Steer
Social Entrepreneur
Lunar Startups creates opportunities and access for underestimated entrepreneurs. The deadline to apply to Cohort 2 is January 13. Danielle Steer, Managing Director of Lunar Startups, describes the events leading to the formation of their organization as a “serendipitous perfect storm.” In 2017, the Knight Foundation became interested in supporting underrepresented, underserved entrepreneurs, such as women, people of color, and LGBTQ entrepreneurs. Around this same period, the late Glen Nelson bequeathed a gift to help American Public Media to invest in the future of journalism. This led to the launch of the Glen Nelson Center. Also, around this same time, Ecolab moved their global headquarters, leaving their former building vacant. Ecolab CEO Doug Baker worked with the building owners to sell the building to a group of entrepreneurs who had a vision for an entrepreneurial center. “So, we had space. We had the funding from the Knight Foundation. We had the organization who was willing to be the home of this startup,” says Danielle. It was from this confluence of events that Lunar Startups was born. Lunar Startups is a year-long incubator dedicated to serving underestimated entrepreneurs such as women, people of color and LGBTQ. Danielle says that she borrowed the term “underestimated” from famed venture capitalist Arlan Hamilton. Amanda Heyman is the Director of Lunar Services at Lunar Startups. Lunar Services provides business and legal technical assistance to those within Lunar Startups cohorts. “The underestimated founders that we work with often don’t have those informal networks to key service providers,” Amanda explains. “For example, they may not have an uncle who is a lawyer, or a neighbor who is a CFO, or a friend who is a software developer. The idea behind Lunar Services is to provide access to that sort of help early in the journey.” Cohort 2, Applications Closing The deadline to apply to Cohort 2 is January 13. If accepted, startup founders will receive the following: Dedicated office space Access to investors $5,000 travel, technology, and marketing reimbursement fund per startup Access to an expert network of professionals providing pro-bono support Access to state-of-the-art equipment for video conferencing and podcast development Weekly startup-specific programming based on the needs of the cohort A peer network And more. Applications close January 13. To learn more about the criteria and to apply, go here: https://www.lunarstartups.org/criteria. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Amanda Heyman and Danielle Steer “It came out of my background as a lawyer for startups and as a co-founder of a startup myself.” @AmandaHeyman @LunarStartups “Those underestimated founders that we work with don’t always have informal networks to key service providers that startups need.” @AmandaHeyman @LunarStartups “They may not have an uncle who is a lawyer, or a neighbor who is a CFO, or a friend who is a software developer” @AmandaHeyman @LunarStartups “That’s my personal motto: Helping people do good better.” @DaniellejSteer @LunarStartups “I was hungry to get back to my program design roots.” @DaniellejSteer @LunarStartups “We have doubled down on the idea that the strength of someone’s social network is increasingly important.” @DaniellejSteer @LunarStartups “If you don’t come from a community of entrepreneurs, it’s hard to know where to start.” @DaniellejSteer @LunarStartups “I truly believe that entrepreneurs have the best eye for identifying innovation.” @DaniellejSteer @LunarStartups “We work hard to build a trusted, robust peer network.” @DaniellejSteer @LunarStartups “Gender diverse companies are 15% more likely to outperform the national industry median. And ethnically diverse companies are 35% more likely to outperform.” @DaniellejSteer @LunarStartups “We’re leaving money on the table, both from the investor’s perspective and from a business opportunity perspective.” @DaniellejSteer @LunarStartups “There is a huge gap between who has access to funding and resources to help them scale up and meet more market opportunities.” @DaniellejSteer @LunarStartups “Some people are just a couple of steps ahead of you and can help you understand the opportunities and challenges.” @AmandaHeyman @LunarStartups “Lunar Services is a startup, within Lunar Startups, which is a startup itself.” @AmandaHeyman @LunarStartups “The members of the initial cohorts will get more individualized support.” @AmandaHeyman @LunarStartups “We are working to help companies that have achieved a certain level of traction, really blow it up.” @AmandaHeyman @LunarStartups “The really hard point for startups is the scale point.” @AmandaHeyman @LunarStartups “We don’t take equity or guarantee investment.” @DaniellejSteer @LunarStartups “Not everyone can afford to take off and pursue just their dreams only.” @DaniellejSteer @LunarStartups “You’ll never see programming here that’s at the same time as daycare pick up.” @DaniellejSteer @LunarStartups “Think bigger.” @AmandaHeyman @LunarStartups “Being a steward and customer of startups is the single most important thing we can be doing.” @DaniellejSteer @LunarStartups Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Lunar Startups: https://www.lunarstartups.org Cohort 2 Criteria and Application: https://www.lunarstartups.org/criteria Glen Nelson Center: https://www.glennelson.org American Public Media: https://www.americanpublicmedia.org Knight Foundation: https://knightfoundation.org Lunar Startups on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LunarStartups Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: https://tonyloyd.com/book  
Top Twelve Popular Podcasts 2018, Kathleen Kelly Janus
Social Entrepreneur
Kathleen Kelly Janus is the author of Social Startup Success: How the Best Nonprofits Launch, Scale Up, and Make a Difference. Note: We have been counting down the top twelve popular podcast interviews of 2018. This interview with Kathleen Kelly Janus was the most downloaded episode of 2018. It like is a people’s choice award. The interview originally aired on January 8, 2018. Kathleen Kelly Janus grew up in a family that cared about social causes. “My family cared about volunteering, and spent our weekends volunteering at soup kitchens,” she explains. “But they also cared about the organizations and supporting the conditions so that nonprofits can not only survive but can thrive.” Kathleen studied the law at UC Berkley. After graduating, she worked as an attorney. In 2004, she co-founded a nonprofit, Spark. Spark makes it easy for young people to give to women's causes. At their first fundraising event, Kathleen and her cofounders watched in amazement as attendees formed a line around the block. That first night, they raised $5,000 for an organization in Rwanda. As word spread about Spark, their revenues doubled every few months. By the third year, they were ready to hire their first Executive Director. But that is where their fundraising plateaued. “Just at the point when we were poised to take the organization to the next level, we hit a wall,” Kathleen says. “We couldn’t get over this hump of $300,000 – $500,000 in revenue.” As a lecturer at Stanford University’s Program on Social Entrepreneurship, Kathleen heard stories of organizations that had overcome the plateau in fundraising. She saw examples of success among her friends. “That is the question I’ve been studying for the past five years,” Kathleen explains. “What does it take for nonprofits to succeed, and particularly in those early stages? What does it take to get over that hump?” Kathleen used what she knew from her own startup experience. She worked with her students to research hundreds of articles on best practices. She surveyed thought leaders and interviewed hundreds of successful social entrepreneurs. Based on what she’s learned, Kathleen has written a new book, Social Startup Success: How the Best Nonprofits Launch, Scale Up, and Make a Difference. She lays out five key strategies of successful nonprofits: Testing Ideas Measuring Impact Funding Experimentation Leading Collaboratively Telling Compelling Stories Social Startup Success describes specific methods for executing each of these key strategies. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Kathleen Kelly Janus “We were operating month-to-month, trying to make ends meet.” “In Silicon Valley, I saw these organizations that were taking off.” “What were organizations like Kiva doing differently than we were doing at Spark?” “What was allowing them to take their organizations to the next level and to maximize their impact?” “That hump is something a lot of organizations are facing.” “Of the 300,000 nonprofits in the United States, two-thirds of them are $500,000 and below in revenue.” “A lot of them have proven ideas that can work in communities around the world.” “Every organization is going to have a different threshold.” “By sustainable I mean, are you able to operate in such a way that allows you to focus your energy on the impact?” “Every one of these organizations had these very early periods of illumination before they went out to raise money.” “They were very careful about testing it early on.” “The best social entrepreneurs fall in love with the problem, not the solution.” “Organizations that measured their impact from the start tended to scale more quickly.” “Always be thinking about the impact and measuring that.” “The organizations that are most successful are the organizations that have a much more distributed leadership culture.” “Go work for someone who has been successful before you.” “You don’t have to reinvent the wheel.” “A lot of the best organizations have executive coaches.” “We all have the capacity to make a difference in the world.” “We all need to think about how we can support our nonprofits.” “Pick a cause. Pick a nonprofit organization, and go out there and make a difference.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Book: Social Startup Success: How the Best Nonprofits Launch, Scale Up, and Make a Difference: http://amzn.to/2ETqk8F Kathleen Kelly Janus website: http://www.kathleenjanus.com/ Kathleen Kelly Janus on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/KathleenKJanus/ Kathleen Kelly Janus on Twitter: https://twitter.com/kkellyjanus Kathleen Kelly Janus on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kathleenkellyjanus Spark: http://www.sparksf.org/ Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: https://tonyloyd.com/book  
Top Twelve Popular Podcasts 2018, Emily Hunt Turner, All Square
Social Entrepreneur
All Square is a craft grilled cheese restaurant and training institute that breaks down barriers for those with a criminal record. Note: Between now and the end of the year, we’re counting down the top twelve popular podcast interviews of 2018. It is a people’s choice award, determined by the number of downloads. This interview originally aired on January 29, 2018. A criminal record can be a barrier to employment, housing, benefits, and voting. With barriers to employment and housing, there is a high rate of recidivism. One study across 30 states found that 67.8% of released prisoners were rearrested within three years of release. Recidivism is a large problem impacting millions of people, including the loved ones of those with criminal records. Nearly one-third of American adults have been arrested by age 23. Arrests fall disproportionately on men of color. One out of every 106 white men is behind bars. Compare that to one in every 36 Hispanic men and one in every 15 African American men. And, it’s not just men who have criminal records. In the ten-year period from 1997 to 2007, the number of women in prison increased by 832%. The volume of cases in the criminal justice system overwhelms the courts. Defendants are pressured to accept a plea deal for probation or early parole. Many who accept these deals do not realize the full consequences of their future employment and housing options. Emily Hunt Turner is doing something about this. Emily is an architect, a civil rights attorney, and more recently the founder of All Square. All Square is a craft grilled cheese restaurant and training institute for those with a criminal record. They plan on opening their restaurant this spring. Their name is a play on words, representing those who have paid their debts to society are "all square" and free to move forward unencumbered. When opened, All Square will be a self-sustaining social enterprise. Profit from the restaurant will fuel the organization. As a non-profit, they will augment their professional institute with grants and individual donations. The Moments that Shaped Emily’s Mission Emily grew up in Wahpeton, North Dakota. Things weren’t always easy. Her mother raised her as a single parent. She says that “as a gay woman from rural North Dakota, from a family who has never known financial stability, I have seen and experienced adversity.” Still, she describes her early life as “the most incredibly happy childhood. I was a very happy kid.” Emily describes her mother as “the most inclusive human I've ever known. She was so eccentric in her dress and her manners. She was quite a force and a vision.” When Emily grew up, studied Architecture at Syracuse University. She became interested in issues surrounding housing. She worked on a documentary film, The Atlanta Way that describes gentrification in Atlanta after the 1996 Olympics. “I learned about some of the troubling practices that took place in the name of clearing housing for athletes. I was beyond troubled. It was shocking to me that this sort of thing could actually happen.” “What came out of that was, unexpectedly, a passion for housing discrimination and displacement,” Emily explains. Seeing her passion, a professor encouraged Emily to study law. “Keep in mind, Emily says, “this was my seventh year in college.” Nonetheless, Emily remarks  “This led to my law degree and my focus on contemporary housing discrimination through zoning, land-use, lending algorithms, and low-income housing tax credits.” Emily worked as an attorney for the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for nearly five years. “I not only ran into widespread housing discrimination in lending, zoning, and land-use, but I also saw it day-in and day-out in tenant selection policies.” Emily witnessed how those with criminal records are excluded from both public and private housing. Eventually, Emily realized that she could not change the outcomes from people with criminal records from inside of HUD. “I had no legal remedies for this exclusion. It is basically legal to exclude those with records from housing.” Emily came up with a business plan. Around a year earlier, she had thought about a grilled cheese restaurant. At the time, she had laughed off the idea. However, she thought, “I want to be part of the solution.” Emily’s solution was to create employment for people with criminal records through a grilled cheese restaurant. She also wanted to create a powerful brand. She landed on the name All Square. Advice that Shaped her Solution Before Emily went further, she shared her idea with several people. First, checked in with two groups of people – the formerly incarcerated and experts in barriers to employment. Both groups agreed that creating a restaurant with employment opportunities was a promising idea. However, they added an extra element. They encouraged Emily to go further by creating an institute that would look at the holistic needs of the person, to prepare them to be successful in the work world. Emily found Edwins in Cleveland, a restaurant and institution employing people with criminal records. She reached out to the owners who met with her and encouraged her. Edwins is a fine-dining restaurant with high overhead. They encouraged her to pursue her fast-casual restaurant idea. Emily checked in with other restaurateurs she knew. They encouraged her to keep the menu simple to avoid high food costs and labor costs. They also told her, if she was going to pursue this idea, she could not do this part-time while still working at HUD. With this input and the addition of the professional institute, All Square was an idea whose time had come. Two months after those conversations, Emily resigned from her job at HUD. The next day, she launched a Kickstarter campaign for All Square. This campaign included a six-city tour across the country. The goal was to raise $50,000. They exceeded their goal, raising $60,000. Overcoming Challenges Coming off of the success of the Kickstarter campaign, All Square had momentum. However, not everything has gone smoothly. Emily suffered a major personal setback. Her mother, who was such a large figure in her life, passed away only three months after the Kickstarter campaign. “This loss was both grave and unexpected,” Emily says. “The emotional hardship has been devastating; so difficult.” Emily feels lucky to have friends and a fiancé to see her through. “Self-care is critical,” she explained. “I'm still working on getting that piece right.” Emily has continued to struggle with the business aspects of All Square. Despite the fact that All Square has raised over $140,000 in capital in the last 16 months, she has struggled to access business loans. “I think we're now there with securing our construction loan, but wow, has it been difficult,” she says. Emily also had a steep learning curve. “I didn’t know the first thing about starting a business when I started this 16 months ago,” she explains. “There are thousands of things I've learned since starting: How to properly structure a nonprofit; understanding social impact investing; understanding the benefits of a hybrid structure; understanding capital markets,” and more. However, she says “I feel like I now have a very strong business foundation.” Emily says that she is grateful for “the humans that have come into my life and the time/energy those that are already in my life have freely given. It's been just incredible.” She has a laser focus on just one goal. “Our focus is on our first location on Minnehaha Avenue. Period,” she laughs.” Emily’s Advice to Aspiring Social Entrepreneurs Emily’s advice to aspiring social entrepreneurs comes from a saying on a neckless she wears. “It always seems impossible until it's done.” But “done” requires more than talk. It also requires collaborating with others, even those with whom you may not initially agree. “Rather than posting articles condemning or condoning certain viewpoints, which I, of course, used to do constantly, find a human in your life with whom you disagree on the subject matter, and see if there's any space for common ground, despite your differences.” All Square is slated to open in late Spring of 2018. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Emily Hunt Turner “It felt like people’s lives were being treated like monopoly pieces.” @emilyhuntturner, @allsquarempls “The law…wasn’t something that had ever appealed to me.” @emilyhuntturner, @allsquarempls “It was really compelling to work from the inside.” @emilyhuntturner, @allsquarempls “The biggest thing that I saw that was the criminal record piece.” @emilyhuntturner, @allsquarempls “You don’t see housing discrimination how you used to – very overtly.” @emilyhuntturner, @allsquarempls “It’s very strategically written into single-family zoning ordinances.” @emilyhuntturner, @allsquarempls “I thought, as a lawyer, there’s a way to be part of the solution from the inside.” @emilyhuntturner, @allsquarempls “Somehow a social enterprise centered on a restaurant and an institute came from all of that.” @emilyhuntturner, @allsquarempls “What if I became the employer?” @emilyhuntturner, @allsquarempls “We led by example.” @emilyhuntturner, @allsquarempls “What if I can be part of the solution in a respectful way?” @emilyhuntturner, @allsquarempls “Weighing in on social media…just doesn’t feel effective.” @emilyhuntturner, @allsquarempls “There’s an institute side of it that looks at the human as a whole.” @emilyhuntturner, @allsquarempls “I will say it was the most terrifying 45 days of my life.” @emilyhuntturner, @allsquarempls “I was asking people to invest in an idea.” @emilyhuntturner, @allsquarempls “It was terrifying, and kind of magical.” @emilyhuntturner, @allsquarempls “I’m the impulsive one in the relationship.” @emilyhuntturner, @allsquarempls “That helped me to say, if not now, when?” @emilyhuntturner, @allsquarempls “It always seems impossible until it’s done.” @emilyhuntturner, @allsquarempls “Real things take real time.” @emilyhuntturner, @allsquarempls “I think law school did for me was really appreciate and value perspectives that diverge from mine.” @emilyhuntturner, @allsquarempls “I still believe finding common ground despite differences is still possible.” @emilyhuntturner, @allsquarempls Social Entrepreneurship Resources: All Square: https://www.allsquarempls.com All Square on Instagram: https://instagram.com/allsquarempls All Square on Facebook: https://facebook.com/allsquarempls All Square on Twitter: https://twitter.com/allsquarempls Film: The Atlanta Way: A Documentary Film on Gentrification: http://www.theatlantaway.com/ Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: https://tonyloyd.com/book  
Top Twelve Popular Podcasts 2018, Jeff Ochs, Venn Foundation
Social Entrepreneur
The Venn Foundation uses Program-Related Investments in surprising new ways. Note: Between now and the end of the year, we’re counting down the top twelve popular podcast interviews of 2018. It is a people’s choice award, determined by the number of downloads. This interview originally aired on February 19, 2018. This week, we’re kicking off a two-part mini-series how to fund a business that does social good. We did something like this in April 2016. Next week, Cathy Clark is going to be here to talk about CASE Smart Impact Capital, an online resource to help social entrepreneurs figure out how to find the right capital at the right time. This week, we’re talking to Jeff Ochs of the Venn Foundation. Jeff is an experienced entrepreneur and investor. He invented and commercialized an educational party game that was licensed by Hasbro. He started a successful nonprofit, Breakthrough Twin Cities. And he was the Executive Director of an angel investing network. In each of these instances, Jeff saw the difficulty of getting the right investments to the right startups at the right time. Jeff explains that today there are two types of capital: Charitable donations, which support causes we care about with no expectation whatsoever for financial return. For-profit investments, which are designed to make as much money as possible for investors on a risk-adjusted basis. “In this current capitalist system, it is obvious why there is no investment capital available that is willing to accept ‘below-market’ financial terms,” Jeff explains. To meet this challenge, Jeff partnered with Rob Scarlett and Jeanne Voight to launch the Venn Foundation. Jeff says, “At the highest level, Venn Foundation has a method for using charitable donations, which today we just give away, to make investments. This allows us to create the below-market investment capital that we badly need. Charitable investments have all the same tax advantages of donations, are anchored against -100% financial returns of donations, and allow the precious charitable donation to be recycled over and over again. Venn Foundation is where charity and investing meet.” Venn is creating a marketplace for charitable investing. They are removing the obstacles that donors face in making charitable investments directly. By opening a special donor-advised fund called a Venn Account, any individual or organization can recommend that their charitable dollars be used by Venn to make Program-Related Investments or PRIs. Venn can syndicate any PRI among any number of Venn Accounts. Financial returns from these PRIs go back to participating funds for the donors to redeploy into new PRIs or to grant out as desired. Venn recently made a program-related investment to Binary Bridge. BinaryBridge creates software that helps humanitarians do their work effectively and efficiently. You may recall our conversation with BinaryBridge founder Lori Most. Who should seek program-related investing? Jeff suggests that business and nonprofit leaders ask themselves, “Is that I’m doing helping advance a charitable cause as defined by the IRS? And if the answer is yes, or maybe yes, the program-related investment tool is something that could apply to you and your goals.” Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Jeff Ochs “If that kind of capital existed, what could we do?” Jeff Ochs, Venn Foundation “It’s where charity and investing meet.” Jeff Ochs, Venn Foundation “Today, there is not a market for charitable investing.” Jeff Ochs, Venn Foundation “If capital behaved differently, what would be possible?” Jeff Ochs, Venn Foundation “Capital is the lifeblood of our economy.” Jeff Ochs, Venn Foundation “If we can change the nature of capital, we can change the way our economy works.” Jeff Ochs, Venn Foundation Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Venn Foundation: https://www.vennfoundation.org BackpackEMR:https://www.backpackemr.com Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: https://tonyloyd.com/book  
Top Twelve Popular Podcasts 2018, Gator Halpern and Sam Teicher, Coral Vita
Social Entrepreneur
Coral Vita is growing climate-change resilient coral in order to restore dying coral reefs. Note: Between now and the end of the year, we’re counting down the top twelve popular podcast interviews of 2018. It is a people’s choice award, determined by the number of downloads. This interview originally aired on January 22, 2018. Coral reefs make up less than 1% of the surface area of the oceans, and yet, they provide a home for 25% of all marine fish species. Globally, coral reefs contain between 6,000 and 8,000 species of fish. As a point of comparison, across North America, there are 914 species of birds. Humans depend on coral reefs for everything from livelihoods, food, and medicines. According to Sam Teicher, co-founder of Coral Vita, “There are up to one billion people around the world who depend on reefs for their livelihoods. Reefs conservatively generate $30 billion per year through tourism, fisheries, and costal protection.” Sam’s cofounder at Coral Vita, Gator Halpern adds, “The ocean provides us, not only most of the oxygen that we breathe, but also food for billions of people around the world.” However, coral reefs are threatened worldwide. It took between 5,000 and 10,000 for the Great Barrier Reef to be created by nature. And yet, because of overfishing, poor coastal development, pollution and climate change, we expect to lose 75% of all of the world’s coral by 2050, unless we do something about it. Sam continues, “This is obviously an ecological tragedy, losing such incredible ecosystems, but what we’re also considering is that this is a socio-economic catastrophe.” Gator added, “These issues of ocean degradation are essential for everyone, everywhere. All lifeforms depend on having healthy coral reefs to survive.” Coral Vita brings dying reefs back to life by growing climate change resilient corals and transplanting them into degraded reefs. They are establishing a network of land-based coral farms. Sam explains, “We sell coral restoration as a service to customers who depend on healthy reefs, like hotels, governments, the coastal insurance industry.” Coral Vita works with cutting edge researchers to grow coral through a process called “assisted evolution.” Assisted evolution allows Coral Vita to boost the climate resilience of coral. Gator and Sam work closely with Dr. Ruth Gates at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, and Dr. David Vaughan of the Mote Marine Lab to commercialize their work. Sam experienced a coral reef restoration project in Mauritius in 2012 and 2013. The project was funded by a grant from the UN. “I saw fishermen returning to this lagoon,” Sam says. “It was amazing to see, we can bring a reef back to life. But, there is only so much grant funding. Given the scope of the problem…that grant funding model wasn’t going to cut it.” Sam and Gator both grew up on the ocean. They met while studying at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. “We both wanted to make the big changes in the world we think are necessary in order to have our society thrive in the future.” Gator explains. When Sam explained his experience with a coral farm in Mauritius to Gator, Gator says “My eyes lit up. I thought this was an incredible thing. My entrepreneurial mind starting thinking, ‘Hey, this could be a company!’” Sam and Gator wrote their business plan in their last semester at Yale. Since then, their work has been recognized and supported by organizations such as Echoing Green, Halcyon Incubator, J.M Kaplan Fund, and more. So far, Coral Vita has raised $1 million to launch and run their pilot coral farm. They are taking pre-orders for an “adopt a coral” campaign. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Gator Halpern and Sam Teicher “Since the 1970’s, we’ve lost around 30% of the world’s reefs.” @SamTeicher, @CoralVitaReefs “We’re projected to lose 75% of reefs by 2050.” @SamTeicher, @CoralVitaReefs “Over the last few years, over half of the Great Barrier Reef died, or is dying.” @SamTeicher, @CoralVitaReefs “There are up to one billion people around the world who depend on reefs.” @SamTeicher, @CoralVitaReefs “Reefs conservatively generate $30 billion per year.” @SamTeicher, @CoralVitaReefs “Coral reefs dying is a serious problem that effects everyone everywhere.” @SamTeicher, @CoralVitaReefs “The ocean provides us, not only most of the oxygen that we breathe, but also food for billions of people around the world.” Gator Halpern, @CoralVitaReefs “We are creating stronger reefs that will be able to survive the oceans of the future.” Gator Halpern, @CoralVitaReefs “The best thing to do for coral reefs is to stop killing them.” @SamTeicher, @CoralVitaReefs “We have this deep love for the ocean environment.” Gator Halpern, @CoralVitaReefs “We have witnessed how reefs have suffered and died.” Gator Halpern, @CoralVitaReefs “It’s definitely taken many evolutions.” @SamTeicher, @CoralVitaReefs “How do we create a system that is financially sustainable, to also do large-scale restoration?” @SamTeicher, @CoralVitaReefs “One grant for one lagoon isn’t going to work for all the world’s reefs.” @SamTeicher, @CoralVitaReefs “I’ve yet to meet an entrepreneur who hasn’t had some sort of setback.” @SamTeicher, @CoralVitaReefs “There is a lot of support out there for people trying to do things to improve our society.” Gator Halpern, @CoralVitaReefs “In the field of social entrepreneurship, there’s a very strong community led by Echoing Green and Halcyon Incubator.” Gator Halpern, @CoralVitaReefs “It’s a field that comes with a lot of personal passion.” @SamTeicher, @CoralVitaReefs “Consider who is already working in this space.” @SamTeicher, @CoralVitaReefs “Try to check your ego.” @SamTeicher, @CoralVitaReefs “Go outside. Be in nature. Jump in the ocean if you can.” Gator Halpern, @CoralVitaReefs Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Coral Vita: http://www.coralvita.co Coral Vita on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CoralVitaReefs Coral Vita on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/coralvitareefs Coral Vita on Twitter: https://twitter.com/CoralVitaReefs Movie: Chasing Coral: http://www.chasingcoral.com Short Film: Naomi Klein at the Great Barreir Reef: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/video/2016/nov/07/naomi-klein-at-the-great-barrier-reef-under-the-surface Ruth Gates: http://gatescorallab.com Dr David Vaughan: https://mote.org/staff/member/david-vaughan Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: https://tonyloyd.com/book  
Share Profile
Are you Tony? Verify and edit this page to your liking.
Stats
Location
St Paul, MN, USA
Episode Count
298
Podcast Count
4
Total Airtime
4 days, 9 hours