Turi Munthe is the founder of https://www.parlia.com/ and Demotix, which became the largest network of photojournalists in the world.
“We synchronise together through processes of emotional contagion and social conformity… This helps produce a shared experience of the world.”Human beings are social creatures. But is this social nature more than just a desire to be connected? Do we actually form one collective consciousness? Are humans more a ‘We’ than an ‘I’?In her book Hivemind: the New Science of Tribalism in our Divided World, Sarah Rose Cavanagh speaks to biologists, historians and psychologists to explore these questions and better understand our “collective self.”But what can we learn from the Hivemind? How has it polarised us? How does it impact our sense of ‘Us’ and what does it do to our feelings about ‘Them’? And what has social media done to our social consciousness?“I think taking our ultra sociality online has led to some group polarisation and this tendency for people with different viewpoints to polarise on opposite ends of the spectrum.”Listen to Sarah Rose and Turi discuss how our sense of self is derived collectively.How we experience the world as a collectiveThe science that proves Emotional ContagionThe threat of conspiracy theories to our consensus realityThe role stories play in our making sense of the worldSynchrony, and the warm buzz of ‘sharing’How stories improve our theory of mindWhether our relationships shape our likes and dislikesThe danger of dehumanisation of our out-groupsHow loneliness affects healthAnd what we humans can learn from bees…“I think that where we need to go is not to avoid our collective social cells, but to make sure that we have human beings as our in-group, rather than this nation or this ethnic group or this religion…”Sarah Rose CavanaghSarah Rose Cavanagh is a psychologist, professor, and Associate Director of the D’Amour Center for Teaching Excellence at Assumption College. Her research considers the contribution of emotions and emotion regulation to quality of life. She is the author of Hivemind: the New Science of Tribalism in our Divided World.More on this episodeLearn all about the Parlia Podcast here.Meet Turi Munthe: https://www.parlia.com/u/TuriLearn more about the Parlia project here: https://www.parlia.com/aboutAnd visit us at: https://www.parlia.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
“You really do have to do bridge building at the community level. People have to learn to talk to each other across sides”The Left and the Right today are miles apart. In the past few years, polarisation has become an integral part of our societies. But has it always been this way - is polarisation a natural part of democracy?Covering the politics of polarisation from Chile through India to Vietnam, via long-standing democracies such as the US and Germany, this week’s guest Thomas Carothers suggests that there are three roots present in every polarised society - religion, race and ideological clashes. But what about societies with no polarisation? According to Thomas, they’re at risk too.“Too much consensus can lead to a dangerous pressure for alternatives that usually tend to be anti systemic, extreme and dangerous…”Listen to Turi and Thomas discuss:Polarisation as a fixture of democracyHow consensus leads to polarised societiesWhether there are problems with a lack of polarisationThe creation of grievance politicsHow Brexit created a different identity polarisationWhether polarisation can be a good thingHow grievance politics differ from Right to LeftWhether we can manage polarisationIf the pandemic has made us less polarised“I think the pandemic has opened our hearts and our minds a little bit in ways that’ll help us feel at least some sense of common humanity beneath the level of the political noise…”Thomas CarothersThomas Carothers is senior vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He is a leading authority on international support for democracy, human rights, governance, the rule of law, and civil society. He is also the author of Democracies Divided: the global challenges of political polarisationMore on this episodeLearn all about the Parlia Podcast here.Meet Turi Munthe: https://www.parlia.com/u/TuriLearn more about the Parlia project here: https://www.parlia.com/aboutAnd visit us at: https://www.parlia.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
“Dyadic morality is ultimately about the link between perceived harm and immorality…”Why do we believe murder is “wrong”? Why can’t we compare the effects of a hurricane with the acts of a paedophile? Kurt Gray argues that human morality stems from “harm” - that moral acts have an intentional agent and a victim, and it is this perception of harm caused by one person to another that allows us to define moral evils.So could this explain political differences? Do we just all have different definitions of harm? In which case, is there a way of reconciling polarised groups by re-examining our own perception of harm and suffering?“I think one way forward is acknowledging that the other side’s perceptions of harm are legitimate…”Listen to Kurt and Turi discuss how harm is the basis of human morality.How intuitionism is actually about harmWhether morality requires a perpetrator and a victimHow dyadic moral theory deals with self-harmWhy people moralise homosexualityThe importance of theory of mind in dyadic moralityGod versus EnvironmentThe moral differences between Liberals and ConservativesHow people remove moral harmWhy perceptions of harm creates political polarisationWhether recognition of perceptions of harm can bridge the political divide“The way to see people as more moral is to acknowledge that their perceptions of harm are not made up, but instead authentic and that they really are worried about safeguarding others from suffering…”Works cited include:Lawrence Kohlberg and his work on Moral DevelopmentJonathan Haidt and his work on Intuition and Pluralism.Kurt GrayDr. Gray is an Associate Professor in Psychology and Neuroscience at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he directs the Deepest Beliefs Lab and the Center for the Science of Moral Understanding. He is also an Adjunct Associate Professor in Organizational Behavior at the Kenan-Flagler Business School at UNC, where he teaches about organizational ethics and team processes.More on this episodeLearn all about the Parlia Podcast here.Meet Turi Munthe: https://www.parlia.com/u/TuriLearn more about the Parlia project here: https://www.parlia.com/aboutAnd visit us at: https://www.parlia.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
“A lot of the human behaviour that seems perplexing, irrational (like politics or religion) is often most effectively explained by Evolutionary Psychology”We evolved to live in hunter-gatherer communities clustered in small units spread sparsely across the landscape. Existentially threatened by outsiders - who brought war as well as germs - humans evolved adaptive psychological behaviours to help negotiate our ancestral environment.Evolutionary Psychology seeks to understand human psychological behaviour from that adaptive perspective. If we protect our children, fall in love, create social hierarchies - what were the evolutionary reasons to do so?“Evolutionary psychology allows us to get sighted to our instincts”Listen to Hector and Turi discuss what evolutionary psychology can teach us about our Politics.Evolutionary Basis for Conservatism and LiberalismThe Politics of Sex: why men and women have different political tendenciesWhy there’s a correlation between conservatism and upper-body strength in menWhy there’s a correlation between liberalism and greater facial expressiveness across both gendersSimon Baron Cohen’s work on autism and the “essential male brain”Why Conservatives are from Mars and Liberals are from VenusHow we can map our politics across the Big 5 Personality TestWhy high-testosterone men tend to share lessThe evolutionary basis for Xenophobia and XenophiliaWhy Conservatives love dominance hierarchies and Liberals spend all their effort trying to pull them down.Why Fear is such a big driver for conservatives (who tend to have a larger amygdala than liberals)What the difference between Chimps and Bonobos can teach us about the evolution of our politicsHow to explain the manifestation of strong man politicians, like Donald Trump, in evolutionary termsThe idea of “Evolutionary Mismatch”: that certain types of behaviour today are a useless hold over from our hunter-gatherer ancestry (like a psychological version of the appendix)And why the Iroquois had a split leadership system: one for war (led by young men) and one for peace (led by the old and the women).“Democracy is the answer, but it often needs tuning”Works cited include:John Hibbing, Kevin B. Smith and John R. Alford and their work on the Biology of Political Differences.Sir Simon Baron Cohen and his work on autism.Hector GarciaHector Garcia is Professor in the department of Psychiatry at the University of Texas and a Clinical Psychologist working with veterans. He’s the author of Sex, Power and Partisanship and hosts a YouTube channel discussing those issues.More on this episodeLearn all about the Parlia Podcast here.Meet Turi Munthe: https://www.parlia.com/u/TuriLearn more about the Parlia project here: https://www.parlia.com/aboutAnd visit us at: https://www.parlia.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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Creator Details

Birthdate
May 6th, 1976
Location
City of London, England, United Kingdom
Episode Count
50
Podcast Count
2
Total Airtime
18 hours, 22 minutes
PCID
Podchaser Creator ID logo 957042