Wade Roush is host and producer of Soonish, a narrative nonfiction podcast with the motto “The future is shaped by technology, but technology is shaped by us.” He writes a monthly column about innovation for Scientific American magazine, is the author of Extraterrestrials (forthcoming from MIT Press, April 2020), and is the co-founder of the Boston-based Hub & Spoke audio collective. He has contributed radio pieces to WBUR and WHYY, and has worked as a freelancer, audio producer, and consultant for numerous shows, publications, and startups. His works of science and technology journalism have appeared in Science, MIT Technology Review, Xconomy, and many other publications. In 2014-15 he was acting director MIT’s Knight Science Journalism program, and in 2018 he was the editor of the hard science fiction anthology Twelve Tomorrows from MIT Technology Review and the MIT Press. He has a B.A. in history and science from Harvard College and a PhD in the history and social study of science and technology from MIT.
This week Harry speaks with Oura Health CEO Harpreet Rai, who's leading an effort to explore how a wearable sleep-monitoring device—the Oura Ring—can pick up patterns that may help diagnose covid-19 infections and other problems.The ring is equipped with sensors that measure heart rate and body temperature, as well as a tiny Bluetooth radio that syncs the data it collects with a smartphone app. The Finland-based company designed the ring primarily to measure sleep quality, but it also contains an accelerometer and a gyroscope that can measure daytime movement and activity.  Together, the data is used to calculate a "readiness score" indicating whether the wearer is fully rested and prepared for the day.Now Oura is collaborating with the West Virginia University Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute to study whether data from the ring can also be used to detect the early symptoms of covid-19 and predict whether wearers will be officially diagnosed with the virus.  The hypothesis is that systematic changes in a wearer's readiness score can presage illness. Rai tells Harry: "Their body temperature is starting to change. Their respiratory rate is starting to change. Their HRV [heart rate variability] is starting to change. We've seen people send us messages that 'Oh, my readiness score changed, and my ring gave me a notification that I might be coming down with a fever, or my body temperature was elevated, and I should take it easy,' and a day or two later they'll feel symptoms, unfortunately, of being sick."If such patterns hold true, the National Basketball Association may be one of the first organizations to benefit. The league bought 2,000 Oura rings this summer in a bid to help protect players sequestered at Disney World for the season.Please rate and review MoneyBall Medicine on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:• Launch the “Podcasts” app on your device. If you can’t find this app, swipe all the way to the left on your home screen until you’re on the Search page. Tap the search field at the top and type in “Podcasts.” Apple’s Podcasts app should show up in the search results.• Tap the Podcasts app icon, and after it opens, tap the Search field at the top, or the little magnifying glass icon in the lower right corner.• Type MoneyBall Medicine into the search field and press the Search button.• In the search results, click on the MoneyBall Medicine logo.• On the next page, scroll down until you see the Ratings & Reviews section. Below that, you’ll see five purple stars.• Tap the stars to rate the show.• Scroll down a little farther. You’ll see a purple link saying “Write a Review.”• On the next screen, you’ll see the stars again. You can tap them to leave a rating if you haven’t already.• In the Title field, type a summary for your review.• In the Review field, type your review.• When you’re finished, click Send.• That’s it, you’re done. Thanks! 
Podcast Recommendations for National Amelia Earhart DayChasing Earhart - Overcoming Your Fears & Chasing Your Dreams: A Conversation with Abigail HarrisonSoonish - A Future Without Facebook (By Wade Roush) The Constant — The Right Stuff, the Wrong Way99% Invisible — Gander International AirportShould This Exist? — Boom: The Return of Supersonic FlightAmy Shira Teitel's YouTube channel — Vintage SpaceToday’s guest is Wade Roush, host of the Soonish podcast.Use #AmeliaEarhartDay for all things related to this day. Helpful LinksGo to RateThisPodcast.com/podcastgumbo to rate and review this podcast. It will help you lose weight. Podcast Gumbo is produced by Paul Kondo each week. Paul also writes the Podcast Gumbo newsletter where he recommends 3 unique podcast episodes every Wednesday.Full transcripts of every episode are on the Podcast Gumbo website. Want some weekly podcasting knowledge? Learn how Paul creates this podcast.Paul can be found on Twitter at @paulkondo.If you didn’t know, I am Paul. This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy
David Sable got his start in reproductive medicine in the late 1980s, a time when he says fertility treatments were "very primitive." But by the mid-2000s, he says, new procedures and new insights into the genetics of development had changed everything. His subsequent time observing (and investing in) the field has convinced him that reproductive medicine is "the most interesting area of medicine this century."Sable is a medical and entrepreneurial chameleon who trained in obstetrics and gynecology, worked as a reproductive endocrinologist, co-founded the Institute for Reproductive Medicine and Science fertility clinic, co-founded the embryo genetic testing firm Reprogenetics, and now works as portfolio manager of the Special Situations Life Sciences Fund and the Life Sciences Innovation Fund while also writing for Forbes and teaching biotech entrepreneurship at Columbia University. Intriguingly, Sable says his earliest inspiration to become a medical entrepreneur came from the brief scene at the end of The Empire Strikes Back in which a robot clinician gives Luke Skywalker a prosthetic hand. To Sable, the seeming everydayness of the operation spoke to the possibility of "taking the miraculous and turning it into the mundane—taking the medicine and the science and along the way adding a lot of engineering to it."Please rate and review MoneyBall Medicine on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:• Launch the “Podcasts” app on your device. If you can’t find this app, swipe all the way to the left on your home screen until you’re on the Search page. Tap the search field at the top and type in “Podcasts.” Apple’s Podcasts app should show up in the search results.• Tap the Podcasts app icon, and after it opens, tap the Search field at the top, or the little magnifying glass icon in the lower right corner.• Type MoneyBall Medicine into the search field and press the Search button.• In the search results, click on the MoneyBall Medicine logo.• On the next page, scroll down until you see the Ratings & Reviews section. Below that, you’ll see five purple stars.• Tap the stars to rate the show.• Scroll down a little farther. You’ll see a purple link saying “Write a Review.”• On the next screen, you’ll see the stars again. You can tap them to leave a rating if you haven’t already.• In the Title field, type a summary for your review.• In the Review field, type your review.• When you’re finished, click Send.• That’s it, you’re done. Thanks! 
This week Harry speaks with molecular geneticist Elli Papaemmanuil about how newly available genomic data could lead to major improvements in the standard of care for cancer patients, leading to an age of true precision medicine.Papaemmanuil is an assistant professor of computational oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. Her lab's research is built around the idea that the genetic sequences of tumor cells reveal distinctive acquired mutations that can allow doctors to predict the course of the disease in specific patients and help them to design individualized treatments. That idea isn't new—but it isn't yet standard practice in oncology, a situation Emmanuil is working to change, in part by using AI and data-driven approaches to analyze the vast number of genetic variations in diseases like leukemia and reduce them to a manageable number of classes amenable to customized treatment approaches.Papaemmanuil says she decided to become a cancer geneticist from the moment she learned about the Human Genome Project as a young person growing up in Greece. She obtained her PhD at the University of London, and now she's working to understand "how we can use genomic technology and genomic data to inform patient care." She was an early adopter of microarrays to conduct genome-wide linkage studies and identify common genetic variations that predispose people to colorectal cancer, leukemia, and other cancers. More recently she's used rapid genome sequencing technology to help complete the first catalog of genes that are commonly mutated in cancer.  She says this kind of information could help identify which patients are at risk for cancer; carry out screening to find patients with early-stage cancer, when treatment outcomes are much better; and most fundamentally, to create data-driven treatment models that account for a patient's age, gender, lifestyle, radiographic data, and genomic parameters."At the moment our standard of care represents brute force," Papaemmanuil says. "Now we understand that there's a lot of complexity [in cancer], and that if we study large enough patient cohorts, and we have genetic information with very good clinical annotation and outcomes, we can bring the AI component into the process and use classification and prediction tools" to, in effect, put a powerful computational advisor in every oncology exam room.Please rate and review MoneyBall Medicine on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:• Launch the “Podcasts” app on your device. If you can’t find this app, swipe all the way to the left on your home screen until you’re on the Search page. Tap the search field at the top and type in “Podcasts.” Apple’s Podcasts app should show up in the search results.• Tap the Podcasts app icon, and after it opens, tap the Search field at the top, or the little magnifying glass icon in the lower right corner.• Type MoneyBall Medicine into the search field and press the Search button.• In the search results, click on the MoneyBall Medicine logo.• On the next page, scroll down until you see the Ratings & Reviews section. Below that, you’ll see five purple stars.• Tap the stars to rate the show.• Scroll down a little farther. You’ll see a purple link saying “Write a Review.”• On the next screen, you’ll see the stars again. You can tap them to leave a rating if you haven’t already.• In the Title field, type a summary for your review.• In the Review field, type your review.• When you’re finished, click Send.• That’s it, you’re done. Thanks! 
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Creator Details

Birthdate
Jan 3rd, 1967
Location
Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America
Episode Count
102
Podcast Count
12
Total Airtime
2 days, 14 hours
PCID
Podchaser Creator ID logo 569963