#APAHM

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Creation Date May 13th, 2020
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Keep the Channel Open episodes featuring conversations with Asian American artists and authors
  1. Trinh Mai is a Vietnamese-American interdisciplinary artist whose incredibly empathetic work encompasses painting, drawing, sculpture, and more. I was pleased to be able to sit down with her for the inaugural episode of this show, and talk to her about her work, her artistic process, and the importance of connection, respect, and compassion in the stories she tells. In the second segment we discussed the importance of cooperation between artists. Subscribe: iTunes | Google Play | Stitcher | SoundCloud | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Leave a review Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Email | Facebook | Twitter | Tumblr Show Notes: TrinhMai.com Bone of My Bone ViETNAMESE FOCUS: Generations of Stories (Quiet) The Artist Odyssey - Trinh Mai Escondido Municipal Gallery
  2. I've known Bryan Ida for a long time, which makes sense because we're family. But that's not the reason that he's one of my favorite living painters. Bryan's work uses bold colors and geometric forms to suggest the urban landscape, and his layered paintings function as a sort of personal archaeology, delving into memory and emotion. We had a great conversation about how his creative expression has changed over the time I've known him, and how his unique process developed. In the second segment, Bryan chose community as his topic, and we talked about everything from the LA art scene to everyone's first community: family. Subscribe: iTunes | Google Play | Stitcher | SoundCloud | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Leave a review Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Email | Facebook | Twitter | Tumblr Show Notes: Bryan Ida Sam Francis Sunshine & Noir: Art in Los Angeles 1960-1997 Sunshine & Noir (UCLA review)
  3. The images from Claire A. Warden's series Mimesis are visually striking and delightfully inscrutable. Like most viewers, I was immediately grabbed by them when I first saw them, but it wasn't until I talked with Claire and read her artist's statement that I really understood what she was trying to say with these pictures. Having that experience, though, really deepened my appreciation for the work. This week, Claire and I talked about her unique process and the reason why it's so important that this series exist in the context of photography. In the second segment, we discussed race and being and immigrant, and how that affects the way one's identity forms. Subscribe: iTunes | Google Play | Stitcher | SoundCloud | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Leave a review Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Email | Facebook | Twitter | Tumblr Show Notes: Claire A. Warden Celeste Ng - Everything I Never Told You Salt: Studies in Preservation and Manipulation Mimesis Lenscratch Art of Photography Show 2012 Fresh Air: Trevor Noah NPR Code Switch: A Graphic Shows How Much the 'Race' Question On the American Census Has Changed  
  4. Esmé Weijun Wang's debut novel The Border of Paradise is one of my favorite books so far this year. A multigenerational epic centered on an interracial family, the Nowaks, this book touches on so many profound topics, from mental illness to intergenerational trauma to culture clash to the very question of what it means to be a family, all done in stunningly beautiful prose. Esmé and I had a great conversation about her book in the first segment, and in the second segment we chatted about our favorite social media platform: Twitter. (Conversation recorded July 19, 2016.) Subscribe: iTunes | Google Play | Stitcher | SoundCloud | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Leave a review Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Email | Facebook | Twitter | Tumblr Show Notes: Esmé Weijun Wang Esmé Weijun Wang - The Border of Paradise Esmé Weijun Wang - With Love and Squalor (e-letter) Heather Havrilesky - Ask Polly Get Bullish Conference Esmé Weijun Wang - “You Are Not Lazy” Esmé Weijun Wang - “I’m Chronically Ill and Afraid of Being Lazy” (elle.com) Esmé Weijun Wang - “Why My Novel Uses Untranslated Chinese” (lithub.com) Junot Díaz - The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao  
  5. Jonas Yip is a photographer and musician in the Los Angeles area, not to mention a friend of mine. I first met Jonas several years ago at the first Medium Festival of Photography, where we immediately hit it off. As he puts it in his bio, Jonas is "more interested in capturing feeling than in capturing detail," something that I've always found to be true about his work. For today's show we talked about several of his bodies of work, including his "Somewhere Between" series and his "Paris: Dialogue" series. For the second segment, we talked about the idea of the Internet as an archive, and what that might mean for our culture as we move into the future. (Conversation recorded March 22, 2017.) Subscribe: iTunes | Google Play | Stitcher | SoundCloud | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Leave a review Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Email | Facebook | Twitter | Tumblr Show Notes: Jonas Yip Jonas Yip - Instagram Jonas Yip Photography - Instagram Jonas Yip - re:place Jonas Yip - Somewhere Between Jonas Yip - Paris: Dialogue Medium Festival of Photography Jeremias Paul Jardin des Tuileries Jonas Yip - Dresses from the Small Years
  6. Rizzhel Mae Javier is a photographer and installation artist based in San Diego, CA. I first met Rizzhel when we were both participating in the portfolio reviews at the Medium Festival a few years ago, and her stop-motion, flipbook-style pieces immediately caught my attention. More recently, Rizzhel was named one of the 2017 emerging artists by the SD Art Prize for her "Unmentionables" project, creating new art out of old mementos. We had a great conversation for the show about her artistic process, what she loves about making mistakes, and her experience as a teacher. For the second segment, Rizzhel chose the Philippines as her topic. (Conversation recorded July 26, 2017.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Play | Stitcher | SoundCloud | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Leave a review Share: > Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Tumblr Show Notes: Rizzhel Mae Javier Rizzhel Mae Javier - Move(meant) Rizzhel Mae Javier - Unmentionables San Diego Art Institute - Millennial Pink SD Art Prize - 2017 New Contemporaries CM Curatorial Keep the Channel Open - Episode 33: José Olivarez ARID Journal - Strange Vistas: The Work of Walter Cotten Richard Keely Duane Michals Eikoh Hosoe Richard Prince Lab No. 347 - Intro to the Dark Art San Diego
  7. Kevin Miyazaki is an editorial and fine art photographer based in Milwaukee, WI. I've been a fan of Kevin's for some time now, both for his own work as well as his work highlighting and supporting the photographic community. We had a great conversation about his work and process, particularly about his use of image pairings and how effectively his photographs suggest a narrative, but with a sense of mystery as well. We also talked a lot about our common experiences as Japanese-Americans, and how our family histories inform our loves and our work. For the second segment, Kevin chose aging and ageism in creativity as his topic. (Conversation recorded August 3, 2017.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Play | Stitcher | SoundCloud | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Leave a review Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Tumblr Show Notes: Kevin Miyazaki Kevin Miyazaki - Echo Kevin Miyazaki - Sky Above Kevin Miyazaki - Camp Home National Geographic - 14 Photos That Illumine a Dark Chapter of U.S. History Photolucida - 2016 Critical Mass Top 50 Lenscratch Lenscratch - Kevin J. Miyazaki: The States Project: Wisconsin collect.give tinytinygroupshow Emily Shur Wendel A. White Kelli Connell Diane Fox Tule Lake Relocation Center Heart Mountain Relocation Center Yonsei (Japanese diaspora) Gosei (Japanese diaspora) Milwaukee Art Museum - Paul Druecke: A Social Event Archive, 1997-2007 Paul Druecke Donate to these organizations to aid disaster relief in Houston: Galveston County Food Bank Food Bank of Corpus Christi Houston Food Bank Texas Diaper Bank SPCA of Texas Portlight Coalition for the Homeless Southern Baptist Disaster Relief Heart to Heart International  
  8. Celeste Ng is a writer based in Cambridge, MA. Celeste's first novel, 2014's Everything I Never Told You, is, without exaggeration, one of the most important books of my life. When I read it in 2016, it gave me my first real glimpse at what representation in fiction could mean, and it was revelatory. Celeste's newest novel, which was just released this week, is called Little Fires Everywhere, and I was thrilled to get the chance to talk with her about it. In our conversation we talked about both books, about the importance of representation in media and culture, our shared obsession with Hamilton, and about Celeste's fascination with family roles. For the second segment, Celeste talked about how she got over her phobia of octopuses. (Conversation recorded July 27, 2017.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Play | Stitcher | SoundCloud | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Leave a review Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Tumblr Show Notes: Celeste Ng Celeste Ng - Everything I Never Told You Celeste Ng - Little Fires Everywhere Purchase Everything I Never Told You and Little Fires Everywhere Little Fires Everywhere Tour Dates Brandon Taylor - Exegesis Keep the Channel Open - Episode 38: Brandon Taylor Fresh Off the Boat All-American Girl Hamilton George Saunders - Lincoln in the Bardo Sesame Street - Me and My Llama Sesame Street - And Now… The Octopus! [Phobia warning: octopuses] Octopus leaps out of water, grabs crab [Phobia warning: octopuses] Sy Montgomery - The Soul of an Octopus Monterey Bay Aquarium Lindsay Hatton New England Aquarium Peter Watts - Blindsight New Scientist - Mirror test shows magpies aren’t so bird-brained Wendy Cope Wendy Cope - The Orange (read by Emma Watson)
  9. Alexander Chee is the author of two novels, Edinburgh and The Queen of the Night. I read the latter of the two last year and it was one of my favorite books of the year. I was pleased to get a chance to talk with Alexander about that book, as well as his essay "How to Write an Autobiographical Novel," which will be included in his forthcoming collection of the same name. In our wide-ranging conversation we also talked about the work of Joan Didion, as well as a surprising influence on the structure of The Queen of the Night. For the second segment, Alexander chose our current political moment as his topic, as well as Ta-Nehisi Coates' recent essay "The First White President." (Conversation recorded September 9, 2017.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Play | Stitcher | SoundCloud | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Leave a review Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Tumblr Show Notes: Alexander Chee Alexander Chee - Edinburgh Alexander Chee - The Queen of the Night NYT - Kazuo Ishiguro Is Awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature Kenny Coble on Kazuo Ishiguro Alexander Chee - How to Write an Autobiographical Novel Caitlin Flanagan - The Autumn of Joan Didion Janet Malcolm - Two Lives: Gertrude and Alice I-Novel Lone Wolf and Cub Path of the Assassin Battle Angel Alita Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me! Ta-Nehisi Coates - The First White President Denis Johnson - Seek: Reports from the Edges of America and Beyond
  10. Min Jin Lee is a writer based in New York. Earlier this year I read Min's latest novel, Pachinko, and it just blew me away. In our conversation, we talked about the book and it's journey to publication, and the importance of making art out of what's true. Then for the second segment we talked about persistence as a writer, dealing with rejection, and learning to be OK with looking foolish in the beginning. (Conversation recorded May 22, 2018.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Play | Stitcher | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Leave a review Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Tumblr Show Notes: Min Jin Lee Min Jin Lee - Pachinko 442nd Infantry Regiment Tom Wolfe - "Stalking the Billion-Footed Beast" John Steinbeck - East of Eden Richard Brautigan John Steinbeck - The Grapes of Wrath Min Jin Lee - Free Food for Millionaires John Dos Passos Ira Glass on Storytelling Han King - Human Acts
  11. R. O. Kwon's debut novel, The Incendiaries, was just released last week, and it's one of the best books I've read this year. In our conversation, we talked about her new book, who the first readers she has in mind are, the inherent unreliability of narrators, and how the characters invent themselves for each other. Then in the second segment, R. O. talked about her other passion: rock climbing. (Conversation recorded July 10, 2018.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Play | Stitcher | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Leave a review Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Tumblr Show Notes: R. O. Kwon #ChannelOpenFiction R. O. Kwon - The Incendiaries: IndieBound | B&N | Goodreads R. O. Kwon - "I’m Korean American, And I Can’t Watch The Pyeonchang Olympics" R. O. Kwon - "Why I Don’t Leave the House Without Putting on Black Eye Shadow" R. O. Kwon - Events Christine No - "A Façade of a Woman: R. O. Kwon’s The Incendiaries" Clarice Lispector T. S. Eliot - "Ash Wednesday" Leonard Cohen - "Hallelujah" Umberto Eco - The Name of the Rose Colin Winnette Ancco - Bad Friends
  12. Franny Choi’s chapbook Death By Sex Machine uses the framing of artificial intelligence to look at things like voicelessness, dehumanization, Asian fetishism, and more. In our conversation, Franny and I talked about her book, about the ethics of making art that uses other people’s voices, about writing lines that surprise yourself, and about Asian American solidarity. Then in the second segment, Franny talked about a recent trip she took to Korea. (Conversation recorded July 24, 2018.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Play | Stitcher | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Leave a review Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Tumblr Show Notes: Franny Choi Franny Choi - Death by Sex Machine: Sibling Rivalry Press | IndieBound | B&N | Goodreads Franny Choi - Floating, Brilliant, Gone: Write Bloody Publishing | IndieBound | B&N | Goodreads Franny Choi - Soft Science: Alice James Books | IndieBound | B&N | Goodreads VS Podcast Franny Choi - “For Peter Liang” Ex Machina Chobits Airea D. Matthews Oh Jung-hee - River of Fire and Other Stories Han Kang - The Vegetarian
  13. Nicole Chung is a writer and editor. Nicole’s debut memoir All You Can Ever Know was released this month. In it, she tells the story of her life growing up as a transracial adoptee, of eventually finding and connecting with her birth family, and of becoming a parent, herself. In our conversation, Nicole and I talked about her wonderful book, our common experiences as Asian Americans, and about how to write a story that is still ongoing. Then in the second segment, Nicole and I talked about how we discuss race and identity with our kids. (Conversation recorded September 6, 2018.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Play | Stitcher | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Leave a review Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Newsletter | Email | Facebook | Twitter | Tumblr Show Notes: Nicole Chung Nicole Chung - All You Can Ever Know: Catapult | IndieBound | B&N Nicole Chung - Events #ChannelOpenPod Nicole Chung - “Magic Can Be Normal” Nicole Chung - “What I Learned From Kristi Yamaguchi” Catapult The Toast Hyphen Celeste Ng - Little Fires Everywhere All You Can Ever Know Giveaway
  14. Jerry Takigawa is a photographer, designer, and writer based in Carmel Valley, CA. In his photo series Balancing Cultures, Jerry explores his family’s history during the Japanese American Internment, creating striking and beautiful compositions that tell the story of a dark chapter in our nation’s past. In our conversation, I talked with Jerry about this body of work, about our shared identity as Japanese Americans, and about how he developed a visual vocabulary that has evolved throughout his artistic career. Subscribe: iTunes | Google Play | Stitcher | SoundCloud | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Leave a review Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Jerry Takigawa Jerry Takigawa - Balancing Cultures Jerry Takigawa - False Food Jerry Takigawa - Kimono Series Alvarado Gallery Turchin Center for the Visual Arts - “Full Circle: 2018 CENTER Award Winners” Atlanta Photography Group #ChannelOpenPhoto Poston War Relocation Center 442nd Regimental Combat Team Center for Photographic Art - Jerry Takigawa interview People’s Park Robin DiAngelo - White Fragility Works & Conversations - Jerry Takigawa Interview: Grace In Uncertainty Center for Photographic Art - PIE Labs Brené Brown - Dare to Lead
  15. Chaya Bhuvaneswar is a physician and writer. I read Chaya’s short story collection White Dancing Elephants this spring and really enjoyed it, both because of the way it centered South Asian and women’s stories, and for the complex, complicated relationships at the heart of each story. In our conversation, Chaya and I talked about White Dancing Elephants; about Seamus Heaney, punishment, and complicity; and about whose stories get called “dark.” Then for the second segment, we talked about some of Chaya’s favorite poets, and why poetry is important to her. (Conversation recorded May 25, 2019.) Subscribe: iTunes | Google Play | Spotify | Stitcher | YouTube | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Leave a review Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Chaya Bhuvaneswar Chaya Bhuvaneswar - White Dancing Elephants: Dzanc Books | IndieBound ALA Annual Conference & Exhibition - Meet the Authors: Chaya Bhuvaneswar Seamus Heaney - “Punishment” Bog body Keep the Channel Open - Episode 87: David Bowles Gloria Anzaldúa A. K. Ramanujan Cherrie Moraga & Gloria Anzaldúa - This Bridge Called My Back Danez Smith Kahlil Gibran - “On Children” Between the Covers - Chaya Bhuvaneswar: White Dancing Elephants Ashis Nandy - The Intimate Enemy Jallianwala Bagh massacre Diana Abu-Jaber Jhumpa Lahiri Angie Thomas Naben Ruthnum - Curry: Eating, Reading, and Race Gina Apostol Kiese Laymon Seamus Heaney - North Derek Walcott Marianne Moore Native American History and Culture: Boarding Schools Chaya Bhuvaneswar - “On Eliot” Eavan Boland Rabindranath Tagore Octavio Paz Rainer Maria Rilke Kaveh Akbar Fatimah Asghar Adrienne Rich Rupi Kaur Maggie Smith Chelsea Dingman Patricia Spears Jones Danez Smith - “summer, somewhere” Nicole Sealey Tiana Clark Terrance Hayes Terrance Hayes - American Sonnets for My Past and Future Assassin Melissa Febos Melissa Febos - “Thesmophoria” Transcript
  16. Michelle Brittan Rosado is a poet based in Long Beach, CA. In her book Why Can’t It Be Tenderness, Michelle writes about California, Malaysia, and the space between, about divorce, and life transition, and new love. In our conversation we talked about her book, about her creative process and how she thinks about poetic form, and about mixed-race identity. Then in the second section we talked about the history of the pantoum, and our experiences with English-language versions of Asian poetic forms. (Conversation recorded May 30, 2019.) Subscribe: iTunes | Google Play | Spotify | Stitcher | YouTube | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Leave a review Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Michelle Brittan Rosado Michelle Brittan Rosado - Why Can’t It Be Tenderness: University of Wisconsin Press | IndieBound Michelle Brittan Rosado - “Poem to My Unborn Son the Morning after the Election” The Southeast Review - “In Search of Evanescence: A Conversation with Michelle Brittan Rosado” Susan Rothenberg - “Double Masked Heads” Pantoum Natasha Trethewey - “Incident” Natasha Trethewey - Native Guard Pantun Shirley Geok-lin Lim Shirley Geok-lin Lim - “Pantoun for Chinese Women” Natalie Diaz - “My Brother At 3 AM” Nicole Homer - “The Dead Line” Gary Soto - The Elements of San Joaquin Arthur Sze - Sight Lines Transcript
  17. Yanyi is a writer and critic. Yanyi’s debut book The Year of Blue Water is part poetry, part essay, part journal, and entirely itself, a document of self-discovery and human connection. In our conversation, we talked about his book, about its form and his process in creating it, and about creating community. Then in the second segment, we discussed Hannah Arendt’s seminal book The Origins of Totalitarianism. (Conversation recorded July 11, 2019.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Play | Stitcher | SoundCloud | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Leave a review Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Yanyi Yanyi - The Year of Blue Water: Yale University Press | IndieBound Yanyi - Events Maggie Nelson - Bluets Maggie Nelson - The Argonauts Hannah Arendt - The Origins of Totalitarianism Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen Are You the One? Transcript
  18.   Binh Danh is a photographer based in San Jose, CA. Using both historical photographic processes and his unique chlorophyll prints—using photosynthesis to embed images into leaves—Binh makes haunting and resonant images about war, aftermath, landscape, and memory. In our conversation, Binh and I talked about his creative process, his interest in history, and the deep connections between all things. Then in the second segment we took a moment to acknowledge the recent passing of legendary photographer Robert Frank, then talked about the aesthetics of smoke. (Conversation recorded September 12, 2019.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RadioPublic | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Leave a review Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Binh Danh Haines Gallery - Binh Danh: After the Gold Rush Daguerrotype Binh Danh - The Crosses Robert Frank Robert Frank - The Americans New Topographics Mrs. Doubtfire William Eggleston - At Zenith Delaney Allen’s Instagram GLOW Transcript
  19. Rakesh Satyal is a writer and editor. Rakesh’s novel No One Can Pronounce My Name was an utterly delightful read, subverting the stereotypical tropes of the immigrant story with humor and empathy to create something wonderfully unexpected. In our conversation, Rakesh and I talked about expanding the notion of what kinds of immigrant stories can be told, using humor to create connection, and writing toward what you want to know. Then in the second segment we talked about ASMR. (Conversation recorded November 15, 2019.) Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | RadioPublic | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn | RSS Support: Support our Patreon | Donate via PayPal Share: Tweet this episode | Share to Facebook Connect: Email | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Show Notes: Rakesh Satyal Rakesh Satyal - No One Can Pronounce My Name Rakesh Satyal - Blue Boy NPR - Code Switch Code Switch - “Hold Up! Time For An Explanatory Comma” A Novel Idea (Bend, OR) A Novel Idea 2018 - Rakesh Satyal Presentation The Brain-Tingling Sounds of ASMR The Joy of Painting Janet Jackson - Rhythm Nation 1814 The Great British Bake Off Commonplace - Episode 67: John Biewen FKA twigs - MAGDALENE Transcript

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