60-Second Science

A daily Science, Medicine and Technology podcast
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The pumpkin’s ancestor was an incredibly bitter, tennis-ball-sized squash—but it was apparently a common snack for mastodons. Christopher Intagliata reports.
It is like when your cell phone keeps you awake in bed—except mosquitoes do not doom scroll when they stay up, they feast on your blood.
Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series: COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks,  Scientific American ’s senior health editors  Tanya Lewis  and  Josh Fischman  catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between.
It seems like the males will do anything, even fake nearby danger, to get females to stick around to mate.
The rosy-faced lovebirds that live in Phoenix appear to be free riding on our urban climate control.
Today we bring you the fifth episode in our podcast series: COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks,  Scientific American ’s senior health editors  Tanya Lewis  and  Josh Fischman  catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between.
New research shows that members of a bee colony all have the same gut microbiome, which controls their smell—and thus their ability to separate family from foe.
Australia’s critically endangered regent honeyeaters are losing what amounts to their culture—and that could jeopardize their success at landing a mate.
A fast-growing front in the battle against climate change is focused on developing green technologies aimed at reducing humankind’s carbon footprint, but many scientists say simply reducing emissions is no longer enough. We have to find new ways to suck carbon out of the atmosphere. A Maine start-up is looking to raise a sinkable carbon-capturing forest in the open ocean.
Today we bring you the fourth episode in a new podcast series: COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks,  Scientific American ’s senior health editors  Tanya Lewis  and  Josh Fischman  catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between.
Particles called muons are behaving weirdly, and that could mean a huge discovery.
The two cities’ rock doves are genetically distinct, research shows.
We know a lot about how sea turtles are threatened by our trash, but new research has just uncovered an underreported threat hiding inside lakes and rivers.
Today we bring you the third episode in a new podcast series: COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks,  Scientific American ’s senior health editors  Tanya Lewis  and  Josh Fischman  catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between.
By collecting the larvae of the fast flyers, researchers have turned the insects into “biosentinels” that can track mercury pollution across the country. Berly McCoy reports. 
Can you pick a lock with just a smartphone? New research shows that doing so is possible.
New research tries to tease out whether our closest animal relatives can be selfless
This is a podcast about sound. Host Randi Zuckerberg discovers the stories behind the sounds we hear everyday … sounds that inform, entertain, educate, get our attention, influence our behavior, and save our lives. Join host Randi Zuckerberg and her guests as they explore how audio shapes our experience and how pioneers are creating the sound of the future. Powered by Audio is supported by EPOS. For more information about how EPOS is unleashing human potential by perfecting audio experiences, visit  https://eposaudio.com This podcast is brought to you by Scientific American Custom Media.
Today we bring you the second episode in a new podcast series: COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks,  Scientific American ’s senior health editors  Tanya Lewis  and  Josh Fischman  catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between.
Scientists studied three varieties of house mice and found that those who had lived alongside humans the longest were also the craftiest at solving food puzzles. Christopher Intagliata reports.
New research shows that when faced with an impossible task, the marsupials look to humans for help.
Today we begin a new podcast series: COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors  Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman  catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between.
You can call it the “revenge of the computer scientist.” An algorithm that made headlines for mastering the notoriously difficult Atari 2600 game Montezuma’s Revenge can now beat more games, achieving near perfect scores, and help robots explore real-world environments. Pakinam Amer reports.
Decoy sea turtle eggs containing tracking tech are new weapons against beach poachers and traffickers.
Spotted hyena males do not fight for mates, so how are certain males shut out of the mating game?
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Podcast Details

Created by
Scientific American
Podcast Status
Active
Started
Mar 22nd, 2017
Latest Episode
May 11th, 2021
Release Period
Daily
Episodes
728
Avg. Episode Length
3 minutes
Explicit
No
Language
English
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