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Forrest Galante, host of “Extinct or Alive” on Animal Planet, explains how to become an adventurer, survive extreme conditions, and find extinct animals. Then, you’ll learn about how “cryptomnesia” can make you plagiarize without realizing it. Please vote for Curiosity Daily in the 2019 Discover Pods Awards! We're a finalist for Best Technology & Science Podcast. Every vote counts! https://awards.discoverpods.com/finalists/ In this podcast, Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer discuss the following story from Curiosity.com about how cryptomnesia can make you plagiarize without realizing it: https://curiosity.im/32Nmsll  More from Extinct or Alive: Extinct or Alive official website — https://www.animalplanet.com/tv-shows/extinct-or-alive/  Animal Planet Go — https://www.animalplanet.com/watch/animal-planet  Forrest Galante official website — https://www.forrestgalante.com/about Follow @animalplanet on Instagram — https://www.instagram.com/animalplanet/ Follow @forrest.galante on Instagram — https://www.instagram.com/forrest.galante/ Follow @AnimalPlanet on Twitter — https://twitter.com/AnimalPlanet Follow @ForrestGalante on Twitter — https://twitter.com/ForrestGalante See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Learn why the phrase “money can’t buy happiness” isn’t always true. Then, learn how different generations write differently online, with some help from internet linguist and author Gretchen McCulloch. Please support this episode’s sponsor! Get your first month of KiwiCo FREE by visiting https://www.kiwico.com/curiosity In this podcast, Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer discuss the following story from Curiosity.com about why the saying “money can’t buy happiness” isn’t always true: https://curiosity.im/2KoFAiP  Additional resources from Gretchen McCullough: “Because Internet: Understanding the New Rules of Language” — https://amzn.to/31vlUiY Follow @GretchenAMcC on Twitter — https://twitter.com/GretchenAMcC Official website — https://gretchenmcculloch.com/ Lingthusiasm, Gretchen’s podcast — https://lingthusiasm.com/ Download the FREE 5-star Curiosity app for Android and iOS at https://curiosity.im/podcast-app. And Amazon smart speaker users: you can listen to our podcast as part of your Amazon Alexa Flash Briefing — just click “enable” here: https://curiosity.im/podcast-flash-briefing. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Learn about what you can do to remember more of your dreams. You’ll also learn about the difference between internet language and regular language, in the first edition of our “Hashtag Tuesdays” mini-series with internet linguist Gretchen McCulloch. In this podcast, Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer discuss the following story from Curiosity.com about how you can remember more of your dreams: https://curiosity.im/31y2Y37  Additional resources from Gretchen McCullough: “Because Internet: Understanding the New Rules of Language” — https://amzn.to/31vlUiY Follow @GretchenAMcC on Twitter — https://twitter.com/GretchenAMcC Official website — https://gretchenmcculloch.com/ Lingthusiasm, Gretchen’s podcast — https://lingthusiasm.com/ Download the FREE 5-star Curiosity app for Android and iOS at https://curiosity.im/podcast-app. And Amazon smart speaker users: you can listen to our podcast as part of your Amazon Alexa Flash Briefing — just click “enable” here: https://curiosity.im/podcast-flash-briefing. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Mind reading tricks can be unnerving, but they don't have to be as scary as some people think they are. Mentalist Jonathan Pritchard explains how he convinces people he can read minds by using the same psychological techniques employed by sales, marketing, and other business leaders. Jonathan has appeared on America's Got Talent, entertained United States troops stationed overseas, and performed on main stages in Las Vegas. He discusses his 25 years of experience as a mentalist, what it's taught him about interacting with other people, and how you too can communicate like a mind reader.  More reading from Curiosity: Cherenkov Radiation Is The Beautiful Blue Result Of Superluminal Speeds The Magician Who Tricked Nazis With Illusions 18 World Languages Have One Remaining Speaker The Two-Card Monte is An Easy Magic Trick For Anyone 3 Astonishing Coin Magic Tricks—And How To Pull Them Off Mentalism and psychology links: Illusion Chasers blog on Scientific American James Randi Educational Foundation James Randi on The One Million Dollar Paranormal Challenge "Sleights of Mind: What the Neuroscience of Magic Reveals about Our Everyday Deceptions" "The War Magician" More from Jonathan Pritchard: "Learn Like A Mind Reader: Strategies for learning anything at the speed of thought" "Perfect Recall: Increase your confidence, learn faster, be more productive, and be memorable" [ ______ ] Like A Mind Reader (Website) Like A Mind Reader on Facebook More books from Jonathan To learn more about this topic and many others check out Curiosity.com, download our 5-star iOS or Android app and join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play Music, and everywhere else podcasts are found so you don't miss an episode! 
Your sense of smell is like a superpower. Dr. Alan Hirsch of the Smell and Taste Treatment and Research Foundation explains how you can make the most of it. Your nose is always working, even when you're asleep. It can affect your mood, your ability to concentrate, and even your sense of time and space. The kicker? A lot of the time, you may not even know you're being affected! To learn more about smell, we sat down with Dr. Alan Hirsch, a neurologist and psychiatrist who specializes in the treatment of smell and taste loss. Dr. Hirsch is Neurological Director of the Smell & Taste Treatment and Research Foundation in Chicago, where he conducts in-depth studies of the chemosensory system and its impact on virtually all aspects of life: behavior, emotions, mood and human interaction, and even learning speed. He has also written numerous books including "Scentsational Weight Loss", "Scentsational Sex", and "What Flavor Is Your Personality?" More reading from Curiosity: The Barnum Effect Is Why This Article Knows Exactly What Kind Of Person You Are Roses Smell Different In Space—And You Can Smell Like Them Too "Solar Paint" Can Change Your Home Into A Clean Energy Source Your Nose Can Hijack Your Brain Why Do We Eat What We Eat? Studies discussed: Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI) Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) Further materials from Dr. Hirsch: Smell & Taste Treatment And Research Foundation, Ltd. Dr. Hirsch's Amazon Author Page "What Flavor is Your Personality? Discover Who You Are by Looking at What You Eat" "Scentsational Weight Loss: At Last a New Easy Natural Way To Control Your Appetite" "Scentsational Sex: The Secret to Using Aroma for Arousal" To learn more about this topic and many others check out Curiosity.com, download our 5-star iOS or Android app and join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play Music, and everywhere else podcasts are found so you don't miss an episode! 
Explorers Justin Fornal and Emiliano Ruprah from the Science Channel’s “Unexplained and Unexplored” discuss the surprising roles that maps have played throughout history. You’ll also learn about why people fidget. We're nominated for an award! Please vote for Curiosity Daily for Best Technology & Science Podcast in the 2019 Discover Pods Awards: https://awards.discoverpods.com/finalists/  Learn more about Unexplained and Unexplored: UNEXPLAINED AND UNEXPLORED First Look | Discovery — https://www.discovery.com/exploration/unexplained-and-unexplored-first-look-pictures UNEXPLAINED AND UNEXPLORED: Investigating the Legend of California's Gold Laden Ghost Ship | Discovery — https://www.discovery.com/exploration/investigating-the-legend-of-california-s-gold-laden-ghost-ship Like Science Channel on Facebook — https://www.facebook.com/ScienceChannel/ Follow @ScienceChannel on Instagram — https://www.instagram.com/sciencechannel/ Follow @ScienceChannel on Facebook — https://twitter.com/ScienceChannel Follow @Justin_Fornal on Twitter — https://twitter.com/Justin_Fornal Follow @EmilianoRuprah on Twitter — https://twitter.com/EmilianoRuprah Additional sources: The surprising science of fidgeting | The Conversation — https://theconversation.com/the-surprising-science-of-fidgeting-7752 Single-trial neural dynamics are dominated by richly varied movements | Nature Neuroscience — https://www.nature.com/articles/s41593-019-0502-4 Nonexercise muscle tension and behavioral fidgeting are positively correlated with food availability/palatability and body weight in rats | Physiology & Behavior Volume 79, Issue 2, July 2003 — https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031938403000866 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Learn about why you might feel stronger after just one workout; why the Earth’s core doesn’t melt, even though it’s so hot; and prosopagnosia, the surprising neurological condition of face blindness. Feeling stronger after one workout? It's not your muscles, it's your nervous system by Grant Currin Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning. (2016). United Kingdom: Human Kinetics. https://www.google.com/books/edition/Essentials_of_Strength_Training_and_Cond/bfuXCgAAQBAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&bsq=%3E16%20workouts  ‌How We Get Stronger. (2020, July 1). The New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/01/well/move/how-we-get-stronger.html  Glover, I. S., & Baker, S. N. (2020). Cortical, corticospinal and reticulospinal contributions to strength training. The Journal of Neuroscience, JN-RM-1923-19. https://doi.org/10.1523/jneurosci.1923-19.2020  Why strength depends on more than muscle: Neural adaptations could account for differing strength gains despite similar muscle mass. (2017). ScienceDaily. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/07/170710091652.htm  Jenkins, N. D. M., Miramonti, A. A., Hill, E. C., Smith, C. M., Cochrane-Snyman, K. C., Housh, T. J., & Cramer, J. T. (2017). Greater Neural Adaptations following High- vs. Low-Load Resistance Training. Frontiers in Physiology, 8. https://doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2017.00331  If The Earth's Core Is So Hot, Why Doesn't It Melt? by Ashley Hamer New theory explains how Earth’s inner core remains solid despite extreme heat |  KTH. (2017). KTH. https://www.kth.se/en/aktuellt/nyheter/new-theory-explains-how-earth-s-inner-core-remains-solid-despite-extreme-heat-1.705398  Hexagonal Close Packing. (2020). Wolfram.com; Wolfram Research, Inc. https://mathworld.wolfram.com/HexagonalClosePacking.html  ‌Belonoshko, A. B., Lukinov, T., Fu, J., Zhao, J., Davis, S., & Simak, S. I. (2017). Stabilization of body-centred cubic iron under inner-core conditions. Nature Geoscience, 10(4), 312–316. https://doi.org/10.1038/ngeo2892  What do you do when you can’t recognize faces? by Cameron Duke Bate, S. (2019, December 26). New Promise for Those Who Suffer from Face Blindness. Scientific American. https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/new-promise-for-those-who-suffer-from-face-blindness/  Damasio, A. R., Damasio, H., & Van Hoesen, G. W. (1982). Prosopagnosia: Anatomic basis and behavioral mechanisms. Neurology, 32(4), 331–331. https://doi.org/10.1212/wnl.32.4.331  Dingfelder, S. (2019, August 21). My life with face blindness: I spent decades unable to recognize people. Then I learned why. The Washington Post. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/magazine/wp/2019/08/21/feature/my-life-with-face-blindness/  Kennerknecht, I., Grueter, T., Welling, B., Wentzek, S., Horst, J., Edwards, S., & Grueter, M. (2006). First report of prevalence of non-syndromic hereditary prosopagnosia (HPA). American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A, 140A(15), 1617–1622. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.31343  Psychology Experiments: Cambridge Face Memory Test. (2020). BBK.ac.uk. http://www.bbk.ac.uk/psychology/psychologyexperiments/experiments/facememorytest/startup.php?r=8&p=0&d=1&dn=0&g=0&m=68f7d848edeaebd6cc29371b806b3017  Sacks, O. (2010, August 23). Face-Blind. The New Yorker; The New Yorker. https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2010/08/30/face-blind  Samuelson, K. (2017, July 14). Why You Can’t Recognize Other People’s Faces. Time. https://time.com/4838661/prosopagnosia-face-blindness/  Understanding Prosopagnosia - Faceblind. (2015). Faceblind.org. https://www.faceblind.org/research/  Subscribe to Curiosity Daily to learn something new every day with Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer. You can also listen to our podcast as part of your Alexa Flash Briefing; Amazon smart speakers users, click/tap “enable” here: https://www.amazon.com/Curiosity-com-Curiosity-Daily-from/dp/B07CP17DJY See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Captains Keith Colburn and Sig Hansen from the award-winning documentary series “Deadliest Catch” share some surprising science lessons from the fishing world. Plus: learn about the psychology behind “sour grapes.” When people can't get something they want, they decide it's not worthy of desire by Kelsey Donk Sjåstad, H., Baumeister, R. F., & Ent, M. (2020). Greener grass or sour grapes? How people value future goals after initial failure. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 88, 103965. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2020.103965 Learn more about Deadliest Catch, Tuesdays at 8 PM ET/PT on Discovery Official website https://www.discovery.com/shows/deadliest-catch Watch Deadliest Catch https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch Follow @DeadliestCatch on Twitter https://twitter.com/DeadliestCatch Follow Keith Colburn on Twitter https://twitter.com/crabwizard Subscribe to Curiosity Daily to learn something new every day with Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer. You can also listen to our podcast as part of your Alexa Flash Briefing; Amazon smart speakers users, click/tap “enable” here: https://www.amazon.com/Curiosity-com-Curiosity-Daily-from/dp/B07CP17DJY See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Learn about why things taste bad after you brush your teeth; a new discovery about how fast the Earth formed that may mean good things about life in the universe; and why women may experience more pain than men.  Why does toothpaste make food taste bad? by Andrea Michelson Schultz, C. (2014, October 13). The Science of Why Toothpaste Makes Food Taste Funny. Smithsonian Magazine. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/science-why-toothpaste-makes-food-taste-funny-180953001/  Carter, C. (2019). Why does toothpaste make everything taste horrible? BBC Science Focus Magazine. https://www.sciencefocus.com/the-human-body/why-does-toothpaste-make-everything-taste-horrible/   Berthold, Emma. (2018, July 31). How do our tastebuds work? Australian Academy of Science. https://www.science.org.au/curious/people-medicine/how-do-our-tastebuds-work   Munger, S. D. (2015, July 7). That neat and tidy map of tastes on the tongue you learned in school is all wrong. The Conversation. https://theconversation.com/that-neat-and-tidy-map-of-tastes-on-the-tongue-you-learned-in-school-is-all-wrong-44217   Biggart, A. (2019, March 30). The 3 Best SLS-Free Toothpastes. Bustle. https://www.bustle.com/p/the-3-best-sls-free-toothpastes-16977453  The Earth formed much faster than previously thought by Kelsey Donk The Earth formed much faster than previously thought. (2020). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-02/uoct-tef022020.php  Schiller, M., Bizzarro, M., & Siebert, J. (2020). Iron isotope evidence for very rapid accretion and differentiation of the proto-Earth. Science Advances, 6(7), eaay7604. https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.aay7604  Scientists have identified a hormone that makes women experience more pain than men by Andrea Michelson UArizona study identifies hormone that causes women to experience more pain than men. (2020). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-03/uoah-usi030420.php   ‌Chen, Y., Moutal, A., Navratilova, E., Kopruszinski, C., Yue, X., Ikegami, M., Chow, M., Kanazawa, I., Bellampalli, S. S., Xie, J., Patwardhan, A., Rice, K., Fields, H., Akopian, A., Neugebauer, V., Dodick, D., Khanna, R., & Porreca, F. (2020). The prolactin receptor long isoform regulates nociceptor sensitization and opioid-induced hyperalgesia selectively in females. Science Translational Medicine, 12(529), eaay7550. https://doi.org/10.1126/scitranslmed.aay7550   Subscribe to Curiosity Daily to learn something new every day with Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer. You can also listen to our podcast as part of your Alexa Flash Briefing; Amazon smart speakers users, click/tap “enable” here: https://curiosity.im/podcast-flash-briefingSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Learn about why opposites don’t really attract; the “propinquity effect” and how physical distance affects the way we feel about other people; and the history of when and why we started using last names.  Opposites Don’t Attract by Kelsey Donk Johnson, M. D. (2018, February 12). No, opposites do not attract. The Conversation. https://theconversation.com/no-opposites-do-not-attract-88839  Montoya, R. M., & Horton, R. S. (2012). A meta-analytic investigation of the processes underlying the similarity-attraction effect. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 30(1), 64–94. https://doi.org/10.1177/0265407512452989  We Like What’s Physically Close to Us by Mae Rice New evidence for the “propinquity effect” – mere physical closeness increases our liking of desirable people and things. (2018, August). Research Digest; Research Digest. https://digest.bps.org.uk/2018/08/01/new-evidence-for-the-propinquity-effect-mere-physical-closeness-increases-our-liking-of-desirable-people-and-things/  Shin, J., Suh, E. M., Li, N. P., Eo, K., Chong, S. C., & Tsai, M.-H. (2018). Darling, Get Closer to Me: Spatial Proximity Amplifies Interpersonal Liking. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 45(2), 300–309. https://doi.org/10.1177/0146167218784903  The History of Last Names by Ashley Hamer (Listener question from Gregory) Surnames Meanings, Origins & Distribution Maps. (2012). Forebears.Io. https://forebears.io/surnames  Surnames & The Norman Conquest | Heritage Family History. (2016, September 3). Heritagefamilyhistory.co.uk. https://www.heritagefamilyhistory.co.uk/blog/2016/09/surnames-the-norman-conquest/  SCMP. (2016, November 17). South China Morning Post. https://www.scmp.com/magazines/post-magazine/long-reads/article/2046955/complex-origins-chinese-names-demystified  The Memi De-Shalit Database of Jewish Family Names at Beit Hatfutsot. (2020). Beit Hatfutsot. https://www.bh.org.il/databases/family-names/jewish-family-names-introduction/  Muraskin, B. (2014, January 8). Jewish Surnames Explained. Slate Magazine; Slate. https://slate.com/human-interest/2014/01/ashkenazi-names-the-etymology-of-the-most-common-jewish-surnames.html  Subscribe to Curiosity Daily to learn something new every day with Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer. You can also listen to our podcast as part of your Alexa Flash Briefing; Amazon smart speakers users, click/tap “enable” here: https://www.amazon.com/Curiosity-com-Curiosity-Daily-from/dp/B07CP17DJYSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Learn about what would happen if you sneezed with your eyes open; why bird poop is two different colors; and, the right and wrong way to think about wealth. In this podcast, Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer discuss the following story from Curiosity.com about what would happen if you sneezed with your eyes open: https://curiosity.im/34KjE9a Additional sources: Bird droppings defy expectations | EurekaAlert! — https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-09/uota-bdd092419.php  A re-evaluation of the chemical composition of avian urinary excreta | Journal of Ornithology — https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10336-019-01692-5  The real reason why bird droppings damage your car | The Telegraph — https://www.telegraph.co.uk/motoring/news/8495819/The-real-reason-why-bird-droppings-damage-your-car.html Why Is Bird Poop White? | Mental Floss — http://mentalfloss.com/article/31262/why-bird-poop-white  Wealth can lead to more satisfying life if viewed as a sign of success vs. happiness | EurekaAlert! — https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-09/bu-wcl090319.php  The Dual Model of Materialism: Success Versus Happiness Materialism on Present and Future Life Satisfaction | Applied Research in Quality of Life — https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11482-019-09763-8  Download the FREE 5-star Curiosity app for Android and iOS at https://curiosity.im/podcast-app. And Amazon smart speaker users: you can listen to our podcast as part of your Amazon Alexa Flash Briefing — just click “enable” here: https://curiosity.im/podcast-flash-briefing. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Learn about why if you complain about “kids these days,” your memory may be to blame; whether a full moon really leads to strange behavior; and whether calculus can help us solve the mysteries of quantum mechanics, with special guest Steven Strogatz. Today is the LAST DAY to help us win! Please vote for Curiosity Daily for Best Technology & Science Podcast in the 2019 Discover Pods Awards: https://awards.discoverpods.com/finalists/ In this podcast, Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer discuss the following story from Curiosity.com about complaining about “kids these days” might be because of your memory: https://curiosity.im/2NWKbcf Additional resources from Steven Strogatz: “Infinite Powers: How Calculus Reveals the Secrets of the Universe” on Amazon — https://amzn.to/36bLz3d Additional publications — https://amzn.to/2MT4d8j  Steven Strogatz official website — http://www.stevenstrogatz.com/ Cornell University profile — https://math.cornell.edu/steven-strogatz Google Scholar profile — https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=FxyRWlcAAAAJ Follow @stevenstrogatz on Twitter — https://twitter.com/stevenstrogatz Other sources discussed: Lunacy and the Full Moon | Scientific American — https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/lunacy-and-the-full-moon/  It's Just a Phase: The Supermoon Won't Drive You Mad | Live Science — https://www.livescience.com/7899-moon-myths-truth-lunar-effects.html Does crime increase when the moon is full? | EurekaAlert! — https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-10/nyu-dci102919.php Download the FREE 5-star Curiosity app for Android and iOS at https://curiosity.im/podcast-app. And Amazon smart speaker users: you can listen to our podcast as part of your Amazon Alexa Flash Briefing — just click “enable” here: https://curiosity.im/podcast-flash-briefing. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Learn about the scientific reasons why people either love or hate horror movies; the surprising way life expectancy affects population growth; and, where you can catch the Orionids meteor shower this weekend. In this podcast, Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer discuss the following stories from Curiosity.com to help you get smarter and learn something new in just a few minutes: Here's the Scientific Reason Why Some People Love Horror Movies (and Others Hate Them) — https://curiosity.im/31WAznN  Improving World Health Will Reduce Overpopulation, Not Make It Worse — https://curiosity.im/2ppd8VC  How to Watch the Orionids Meteor Shower in 2019 — https://curiosity.im/2lvZ7nx  Please nominate Curiosity Daily for Best Technology & Science Podcast in the 2019 Discover Pods Awards! It's free and only takes a minute. Thanks so much! https://awards.discoverpods.com/nominations/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Learn how friction causes static electricity. Then, learn from renowned theoretical physicist Sean Carroll why understanding the Many Worlds Theory could be the best way for us to understand the universe. In this podcast, Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer discuss the following story from Curiosity.com about how friction causes static electricity: https://curiosity.im/32T2CEy   Publications and more from Sean Carroll: “Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime” on Amazon — https://amzn.to/2Ohl9qp  “The Big Picture: On the Origins of Life, Meaning, and the Universe Itself” on Amazon — https://amzn.to/2LGOTv8 “From Eternity to Here: The Quest for the Ultimate Theory of Time” on Amazon — https://amzn.to/2ObFkWH  Follow @seanmcarroll on Twitter — https://twitter.com/seanmcarroll Sean Carroll’s website — https://www.preposterousuniverse.com/ Sean Carroll’s Mindscape Podcast — https://www.preposterousuniverse.com/podcast/ Download the FREE 5-star Curiosity app for Android and iOS at https://curiosity.im/podcast-app. And Amazon smart speaker users: you can listen to our podcast as part of your Amazon Alexa Flash Briefing — just click “enable” here: https://curiosity.im/podcast-flash-briefing. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Learn about how some plants may have a sense of sight. Then, learn about how emoji reflect cultural differences around the world, in the final edition of our “Hashtag Tuesdays” mini-series with internet linguist Gretchen McCulloch. In this podcast, Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer discuss the following story from Curiosity.com about how some plants may have a sense of sight: https://curiosity.im/2KMMgHw  Additional resources from Gretchen McCullough: “Because Internet: Understanding the New Rules of Language” — https://amzn.to/31vlUiY Follow @GretchenAMcC on Twitter — https://twitter.com/GretchenAMcC Official website — https://gretchenmcculloch.com/ Lingthusiasm, Gretchen’s podcast — https://lingthusiasm.com/ Download the FREE 5-star Curiosity app for Android and iOS at https://curiosity.im/podcast-app. And Amazon smart speaker users: you can listen to our podcast as part of your Amazon Alexa Flash Briefing — just click “enable” here: https://curiosity.im/podcast-flash-briefing. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Learn about how you can go on a simulated mission to Mars (in Spain); and, what the weather forecast really means when it says there’s a chance of rain. You’ll also learn about how people around the world talk differently online, with internet linguist Gretchen McCulloch. In this podcast, Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer discuss the following stories from Curiosity.com to help you get smarter and learn something new in just a few minutes: You Can Go on a Simulated Mission to Mars in Spain — https://curiosity.im/323VOnb  Here's What a Chance of Rain Really Means — https://curiosity.im/2KLZMuS  Additional resources from Gretchen McCullough: “Because Internet: Understanding the New Rules of Language” — https://amzn.to/31vlUiY Follow @GretchenAMcC on Twitter — https://twitter.com/GretchenAMcC Official website — https://gretchenmcculloch.com/ Lingthusiasm, Gretchen’s podcast — https://lingthusiasm.com/ Download the FREE 5-star Curiosity app for Android and iOS at https://curiosity.im/podcast-app. And Amazon smart speaker users: you can listen to our podcast as part of your Amazon Alexa Flash Briefing — just click “enable” here: https://curiosity.im/podcast-flash-briefing. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Learn about the energy limit of the human body; how they make meat-like burgers from plants; and the surprisingly advanced technology behind your favorite fireworks shows. In this podcast, Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer discuss the following stories from Curiosity.com to help you get smarter and learn something new in just a few minutes: Scientists Have Pinpointed the Energy Limit of the Human Body — https://curiosity.im/2Xq9Hh1  How Do They Make Meat-Like Burgers From Plants? — https://curiosity.im/2MJJN3J  There's Surprisingly Advanced Technology Behind Your Favorite Fireworks Shows — https://curiosity.im/2MLboSb  Want to support our show? Register for the 2019 Podcast Awards and nominate Curiosity Daily to win for People’s Choice, Education, and Science & Medicine. After you register, simply select Curiosity Daily from the drop-down menus (no need to pick nominees in every category): https://curiosity.im/podcast-awards-2019  Download the FREE 5-star Curiosity app for Android and iOS at https://curiosity.im/podcast-app. And Amazon smart speaker users: you can listen to our podcast as part of your Amazon Alexa Flash Briefing — just click “enable” here: https://curiosity.im/podcast-flash-briefing. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Learn about the weird reason why revolving doors were invented; why people who can admit what they don’t know tend to know more; and why a thought experiment called the trolley problem may be more relevant than ever. Please support our sponsors! Get your first month of KiwiCo FREE by visiting https://www.kiwico.com/curiosity. In this podcast, Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer discuss the following stories from Curiosity.com to help you get smarter and learn something new in just a few minutes: This Is the Weird Reason Revolving Doors Were Invented — https://curiosity.im/2XoJAHg  People Who Can Admit What They Don't Know Tend to Know More — https://curiosity.im/2XsreFh  The Trolley Problem Is a 50-Year-Old Moral Dilemma — https://curiosity.im/2MJUDH2  Download the FREE 5-star Curiosity app for Android and iOS at https://curiosity.im/podcast-app. And Amazon smart speaker users: you can listen to our podcast as part of your Amazon Alexa Flash Briefing — just click “enable” here: https://curiosity.im/podcast-flash-briefing. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Learn why talking to yourself in the third person can help you keep your emotions in check. Then, learn about “superbugs” (and why we need to stop them) with Dr. Matt McCarthy, author of the new book “Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic.” In this podcast, Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer discuss the following story from Curiosity.com about research that suggests talking to yourself in the third person can benefit your mental health: https://curiosity.im/2I2Raxy Additional resources from Dr. Matt McCarthy: Pick up “Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic” on Amazon — https://amzn.to/2ENNpuW Official website — http://www.drmattmccarthy.com/ Follow @DrMattMcCarthy on Twitter — https://twitter.com/drmattmccarthy What Superbug Hunters Know That We Don’t | The New York Times — https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/20/opinion/hospitals-antibiotic-resistant-bacteria-superbugs.html If you love our show and you're interested in hearing full-length interviews, then please consider supporting us on Patreon. You'll get exclusive episodes and access to our archives as soon as you become a Patron! https://www.patreon.com/curiositydotcom Download the FREE 5-star Curiosity app for Android and iOS at https://curiosity.im/podcast-app. And Amazon smart speaker users: you can listen to our podcast as part of your Amazon Alexa Flash Briefing — just click “enable” here: https://curiosity.im/podcast-flash-briefing. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Learn about how scientists developed a self-repairing battery. Plus: science communicator Trace Dominguez answers a listener question about the difference between 4G and 5G networks. In this podcast, Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer discuss the following story from Curiosity.com about how scientists have developed a self-repairing battery: https://curiosity.im/2JZD57m Additional resources from Trace Dominguez: How We Got to 5G, Explained — https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1mtzyeKUPY Subscribe to Uno Dos of Trace on YouTube — https://www.youtube.com/user/TravellinTrace Follow @tracedominguez on Twitter — https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Trace Dominguez on Facebook — https://www.facebook.com/official.tracedominguez If you love our show and you're interested in hearing full-length interviews, then please consider supporting us on Patreon. You'll get exclusive episodes and access to our archives as soon as you become a Patron! https://www.patreon.com/curiositydotcom Download the FREE 5-star Curiosity app for Android and iOS at https://curiosity.im/podcast-app. And Amazon smart speaker users: you can listen to our podcast as part of your Amazon Alexa Flash Briefing — just click “enable” here: https://curiosity.im/podcast-flash-briefing. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Learn about the strangely-named hairy ball theorem that explains why there’s always a storm brewing somewhere; new research into how you can practice more effectively; and why there are safer ways to be eco-friendly than by reusing your disposable water bottle. In this podcast, Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer discuss the following stories from Curiosity.com to help you get smarter and learn something new in just a few minutes: The Hairy Ball Theorem Says There's Always a Storm Brewing Somewhere — https://curiosity.im/2I4UtnN The Secret to Effective Practice? Taking Breaks — Even Short Ones — https://curiosity.im/2K4Rwr4 Don't Reuse That Disposable Water Bottle — There Are Safer Ways to Be Eco-Friendly — https://curiosity.im/2IapFlC If you love our show and you're interested in hearing full-length interviews, then please consider supporting us on Patreon. You'll get exclusive episodes and access to our archives as soon as you become a Patron! https://www.patreon.com/curiositydotcom Download the FREE 5-star Curiosity app for Android and iOS at https://curiosity.im/podcast-app. And Amazon smart speaker users: you can listen to our podcast as part of your Amazon Alexa Flash Briefing — just click “enable” here: https://curiosity.im/podcast-flash-briefing. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Learn about why there’s no patent for the polio vaccine; a hypothesis that says a black hole would incinerate you; and what causes “Alexander’s band,” the dark strip of sky inside a double rainbow. Please support our sponsors! Get two months of unlimited access to over 25,000 classes on Skillshare — for free. To sign up, go to skillshare.com/curiosity. In this podcast, Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer discuss the following stories from Curiosity.com to help you get smarter and learn something new in just a few minutes: Jonas Salk Didn't Patent His Polio Vaccine — https://curiosity.im/2HWBfm1 The Black Hole Firewall Hypothesis Says a Black Hole Would Incinerate You on the Spot — https://curiosity.im/2HZG65J Alexander's Band Is the Dark Strip of Sky Inside a Double Rainbow — https://curiosity.im/2HWALMM If you love our show and you're interested in hearing full-length interviews, then please consider supporting us on Patreon. You'll get exclusive episodes and access to our archives as soon as you become a Patron! https://www.patreon.com/curiositydotcom Download the FREE 5-star Curiosity app for Android and iOS at https://curiosity.im/podcast-app. And Amazon smart speaker users: you can listen to our podcast as part of your Amazon Alexa Flash Briefing — just click “enable” here: https://curiosity.im/podcast-flash-briefing. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Astronomy isn't just about looking up at the sky. The Adler Planetarium's Michelle Nichols delves deep into the lessons that astronomy can teach us about our own world and gives an update on when (and why) we're hoping to finish the "race to Mars." Plus: the surprising relationship many scientists have with religion. As Director of Public Observing, Michelle leads the Adler Planetarium's various telescope and sky observing efforts, including the 'Scopes in the City telescope outreach program, free nighttime observing in the Doane Observatory via Doane at Dusk, Adler's telescope volunteer program, and much more.  More reading from Curiosity: What It Takes To Be An Astronaut The Overview Effect Describes How Leaving Earth Changes Your Perspective The 100 Year Starship's Effort To Make Interstellar Travel Possible Chaco Canyon: Views That Have Dazzled For Centuries Your Secret Weapon To Chill Beer Quickly Additional resources discussed: The Adler Planetarium website So you want to be an astronaut? Here's what it takes (USA Today) Eggplant (Solanum melongena) Domestication History and Genealogy Origins of the Potato Astronomy Lab for Kids: 52 Family-Friendly Activities (Lab Series) To learn more about this topic and many others check out Curiosity.com, download our 5-star iOS or Android app and join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play Music, and everywhere else podcasts are found so you don't miss an episode!
Have you ever wanted to discover a long-lost magic spell or incantation? Well now is your chance! Experts from the Newberry Library in Chicago discuss how you can read and even help decipher unique medieval manuscripts from the comfort of your own home. They also take a closer look at how understanding magic in the Middle Ages can help us understand our world better. This week's guests include: Jill Gage, Custodian of the John M. Wing Foundation on the History of Printing and Bibliographer for British Literature and History; Christopher Fletcher, Program Assistant in the Renaissance Center; and Matthew Clarke, Digital Initiatives and Metadata Assistant. Further reading from Curiosity: An Introduction to the Middle Ages This Library Straddles Two Countries You Can Visit The World's Oldest Library What Makes A Good Computer Password? (Probably Not What You've Been Told) Magic Was Medicine To Many Medieval Minds Resources from the Newberry Library: Religious Change and Print 1450-1700 project site The Transcribing Faith resource Blog post covering the technical details of the project The Civil War in Letters, a past transcription project Newberry resources for classrooms Genealogy at the Newberry Library Digital exhibitions and research collections on Internet Archive and CARLI To learn more about this topic and many others check out Curiosity.com, download our 5-star iOS or Android app and join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play Music, and everywhere else podcasts are found so you don't miss an episode!
Why is the solar eclipse on August 21, 2017, going to be such a huge deal? Michelle Nichols, educator and astronomer at the Adler Planetarium in Chicago, joins us on a special episode of the Curiosity Podcast to explain everything from the science to the community surrounding this astronomical event. As Director of Public Observing, Michelle leads the Adler Planetarium’s various telescope and sky observing efforts, including the ‘Scopes in the City telescope outreach program, free nighttime observing in the Doane Observatory via Doane at Dusk, Adler’s telescope volunteer program, and much more. More reading from Curiosity: The Overview Effect Describes How Leaving Earth Changes Your Perspective Many Of History's Greatest Minds Always Made Time For... Curiosity's Special 2017 Eclipse Hub More eclipse resources: Your Total Solar Eclipse Instruction Manual The 2017 Eclipse at the Adler Planetarium Safe Solar Viewing Guidelines Main NASA Site For This Eclipse To learn more about this topic and many others check out Curiosity.com, download our 5-star iOS or Android app and join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play Music, and everywhere else podcasts are found so you don't miss an episode!
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Podcast Details

Created by
Cody Gough
Podcast Status
Active
Started
Nov 23rd, 2020
Latest Episode
Nov 23rd, 2020
Release Period
Daily
Episodes
798
Avg. Episode Length
12 minutes
Explicit
No
Order
Episodic
Language
English
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