Field, Lab, Earth

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The World Food Prize is awarded to those who have made outstanding contributions to food and food security around the world. The brainchild of Nobel Laureate Dr. Norman Borlaug, it was founded in 1986 and is the foremost international award for those in these fields. Dr. Rattan Lal is the 2020 World Food Prize Laureate for his continent-spanning work with climate change and holistic soil health. This episode, we talk with Dr. Lal about his life, career, and the soil health lessons he’s learned along the way. Tune in to learn: The importance of animals like earthworms, termites, and centipedes to soil health How covering soils can increase soil health properties How the health of animals, people, plants, soil, and the environment intertwine What future steps we can take to increase food security and soil health If you would like more information about this topic, the CSA News feature about Dr. Lal is available here: https://doi.org/10.1002/csan.20290 It will be freely available from 16 October to 30 October, 2020. If you would like to find transcripts for this episode or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: http://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/ Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don’t forget to subscribe. If you would like to reach out to Dr. Lal, you can find him here: lal.1@osu.edu Resources CEU Quiz: https://www.certifiedcropadviser.org/education/classroom/classes/882 World Food Prize: https://www.worldfoodprize.org/ World Food Prize feature on Dr. Rattan Lal: https://www.worldfoodprize.org/en/laureates/2020_lal/ Rattan Lal: Translating Science Into Action video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ug07app6FDo&feature=youtu.be Rattan Lal: Soil Is Like a Bank Account video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4zA8F1Q8P4U&feature=youtu.be Rattan Lal: Early Life and Path to The Ohio State University video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C36I4_EK24w&feature=youtu.be CFAES Faculty Profile: Rattan Lal video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wnNXKqgSMMI&feature=youtu.be Rare Earth Alumni Magazine video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=53z-97lKkuI&feature=youtu.be The Ohio State University: https://www.osu.edu/ Soil Science Society of America: www.soils.org American Society of Agronomy: www.agronomy.org Crop Science Society of America: www.crops.org International Union of Soil Sciences: https://www.iuss.org/ United Nations University: https://unu.edu/ USDA ARS: https://www.ars.usda.gov/ USDA NRCS: https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/site/national/home/ “Soil Carbon Sequestration Impacts on Global Climate Change and Food Security” article in Science: https://science.sciencemag.org/content/304/5677/1623 Rattan Lal, PhD Presenting at Nobel Conference 54 video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5mbSzIojsRQ S is for Soil book: https://lsrwa.org/news/s-is-for-soils/ Sponsored by Gasmet Technologies. Gasmet Technologies range of portable analyzers are used for environmental research measuring CO2, CH4, N2O, NH3 & H2O gas fluxes simultaneously at sub-ppm levels. Check out www.gasmet.com for more information and to request a quotation. Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.
Dr. Norman Borlaug was an American agronomist who specialized in wheat breeding. Known as the Father of the Green Revolution, he helped other hunger fighters save hundreds of thousands of lives in Mexico, India, Pakistan, and other countries throughout his long and varied career. He won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1970 and founded the World Food Prize to celebrate other food fighters worldwide. This episode we speak with his granddaughter and colleague Julie Borlaug and fellow colleagues Dr. Ronnie Coffman and Dr. Ed Runge to discuss the “Man who Fed the World.” Listen to learn: What are the three major improvements Dr. Borlaug contributed to wheat breeding What role sports played in Dr. Borlaug’s life What was the Green Revolution What obstacles still remain in the realm of hunger fighting If you would like to find transcripts for this episode or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: http://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/ Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don’t forget to subscribe. If you would like to reach out to Julie, you can find her here: julie@inari.com https://twitter.com/JulieBorlaug https://www.linkedin.com/in/julie-borlaug-3b7b6710/ If you would like to reach out to Ronnie, you can find him here: wrc2@cornell.edu If you would like to reach out to Ed, you can find him here: e-runge@tamu.edu Resources CEU Quiz: https://www.certifiedcropadviser.org/education/classroom/classes/873 Leon Hesser’s book, The Man Who Fed the World: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/man-who-fed-the-world-leon-hesser/1100451132 Roger Thurow’s book, The Last Hunger Season: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-last-hunger-season-roger-thurow/1110792507 Roger Thurow’s book, Enough: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/enough-roger-thurow/1116903601?ean=9781586488185 Noel Veitmeyer’s book, Our Daily Bread: https://www.amazon.com/Daily-Bread-Essential-Norman-Borlaug/dp/0578095556 Charles C. Mann’s book, The Wizard and The Prophet: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-wizard-and-the-prophet-charles-c-mann/1126242716?ean=9780345802842 PBS Special, The Man Who Tried to Feed the World: https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/films/man-who-tried-to-feed-the-world/ Norman Borlaug Heritage Foundation: https://www.normanborlaug.org/ Norman Borlaug Institute for International Agriculture: https://borlaug.tamu.edu/ Borlaug Global Rust Initiative: https://www.globalrust.org/ Borlaug Global Rust Initiative Twitter: @globalrust, https://twitter.com/globalrust Borlaug Global Rust Initiative Facebook: @globalrust: https://www.facebook.com/globalrust World Food Prize: https://www.worldfoodprize.org/ The Rockefeller Foundation: https://www.rockefellerfoundation.org/ University of Minnesota: https://twin-cities.umn.edu/ Texas A&M University: https://www.tamu.edu/ Cornell Global Development Department Twitter: @CornellGlobal, https://twitter.com/CornellGlobal Cornell Global Development Department Facebook: @CornellGlobal, https://www.facebook.com/CornellGlobalDevelopment/ Cornell College of Agriculture and Life Sciences: https://cals.cornell.edu/ Cornell College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Twitter: @CornellCALS, https://twitter.com/CornellCALS Cornell College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Facebook: @CornellCALS, https://www.facebook.com/CornellCALS Cornell University: https://www.cornell.edu/ Cornell University Twitter: @Cornell, https://twitter.com/Cornell Cornell University Facebook: @Cornell, https://www.facebook.com/Cornell Iowa State University: https://www.iastate.edu/ CIMMYT: https://www.cimmyt.org/ USDA: https://www.usda.gov/ Alliance for Science: https://allianceforscience.cornell.edu/ Global Youth Institute: https://www.worldfoodprize.org/en/youth_programs/global_youth_institute/ World Food Program: https://www.wfpusa.org/  World Food Programme: https://www.wfp.org/   Peace Corps: https://www.peacecorps.gov/ Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation: https://www.gatesfoundation.org/ Alliance to End Hunger: https://alliancetoendhunger.org/ Sponsored by Gasmet Technologies. Gasmet Technologies range of portable analyzers are used for environmental research measuring CO2, CH4, N2O, NH3 & H2O gas fluxes simultaneously at sub-ppm levels. Check out www.gasmet.com for more information and to request a quotation. Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.
“Tapping into Wild Carrot Diversity for New Sources of Abiotic Stress Tolerance to Strengthen Carrot Pre-Breeding in Bangladesh and Pakistan” with Dr. Philipp Simon. Carrots are a diverse crop that grows worldwide. Packed with nutrients and flavor, many of its wild relatives also carry important traits such as resistance to abiotic stresses like drought, heat, or salinity. These traits can be crucial as we look at how to feed our growing population; however, without growing these carrot wild relatives under these stressful conditions, it can be difficult to pinpoint which varieties carry which traits. Partnering with scientists in Bangladesh and Pakistan, Dr. Phil Simon and his team are working to identify valuable traits in carrots from all over the world in the hopes of improving future carrot breeding efforts. Tune in to learn: What common roadside plant is actually a wild relative of carrot How the lifecycle of carrots works What it’s like to go on a seed collecting expedition How to grow carrots at home This paper is currently undergoing publication. The show notes will update when the final link is available. If you would like to find transcripts for this episode or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: http://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/ Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don’t forget to subscribe. If you would like to reach out to Phil, you can find him here: Philipp.Simon@usda.gov Resources CEU Quiz: https://www.certifiedcropadviser.org/education/classroom/classes/863 Global Crop Diversity Trust: https://www.croptrust.org/ Crop Wild Relatives Project: www.cwrdiversity.org United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization: http://www.fao.org/home/en/ Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research: https://www.cgiar.org/ Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.
“Research and Funding in the Time of COVID‐19” with Dr. Gary Pierzynski. The global COVID-19 pandemic has caused disruption worldwide, with research projects, schools, grocery stores, and more all impacted. Dr. Gary Pierzynski, the Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Education in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University, has seen much of this disruption in his day to day work and the research conducted across the college. This episode, we discuss the current and predicted impacts of COVID-19 in agriculture, agricultural research, food supply chains, and more. Listen to learn: What are the four pieces of the food supply chain? What present impacts are we seeing from COVID-19 on agriculture and agricultural research? How will agriculture and agricultural research change moving forward from the pandemic? How can we build resiliency into our food supply chains, agriculture, and research? If you would like more information about this topic, this episode’s paper article is available here: https://doi.org/10.1002/csan.20139 It will be freely available from 4 September to 18 September, 2020. If you would like to find transcripts for this episode or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: http://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/ Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don’t forget to subscribe. If you would like to reach out to Gary, you can find him here: pierzynski.3@osu.edu Resources CEU Quiz: https://www.certifiedcropadviser.org/education/classroom/classes/862 American Society of Agronomy: https://www.agronomy.org/ Crop Science Society of America: https://www.crops.org/ Soil Science Society of America: https://www.soils.org/ Sustainable, Secure Food Blog: https://sustainable-secure-food-blog.com/ Association for Public and Land Grant Universities: https://www.aplu.org/ USDA: https://www.usda.gov/ Farm Service Agency: https://www.fsa.usda.gov/ Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.
“A Review of Turfgrass Sports Field Variability and Its Implications on Athlete-Surface Interactions” with Dr. Chase Straw. Sports scientists study how athletes perform during exercise and how that affects the body. Turfgrass scientists study how to improve and maintain the health of turfgrass. But what happens when you combine the two? Dr. Chase Straw’s review paper decided to find out, searching out research that combines both fields to better understand athlete biomechanics, physiology and perceptions, performance, and injuries. Listen in to find out: How combining player, lab, and field data can increase player performance and safety What impact perceptions can have on how players perform What new technologies are being used to measure things like athlete performance and biomechanics What research gaps still exist when comparing and combining these fields If you would like more information about this topic, this episode’s paper is available here: https://doi.org/10.1002/agj2.20193 It will be freely available from 21 August to 4 September, 2020. If you would like to find transcripts for this episode or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: http://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/ Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don’t forget to subscribe. If you would like to reach out to Chase, you can find him here: Personal Twitter: @StrawTurf cstraw@tamu.edu http://soilcrop.tamu.edu/people/straw-chase/ Resources CEU Quiz: http://www.agronomy.org/education/classroom/classes/859 Texas A&M Aggie Turf Program: https://aggieturf.tamu.edu/ Texas A&M AggieTurf Program Twitter: @AggieTurf Chase’s Google Scholar page: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=aAvX0rUAAAAJ&hl=en&oi=sra Sports Fields: Design, Construction, and Maintenance by James C. Puhalla, Jeffrey V. Krans, and J. Michael Goatley: https://amzn.to/2CYc5DD The Science and Engineering of Sport Surfaces (Routledge Research in Sports Technology and Engineering) by Sharon Dixon, Paul Fleming, Iain James, and Matt Carré: https://amzn.to/2D60JNM Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.
“A preliminary investigation of wild pig (Sus scrofa ) impacts in water quality” with Dr. John Brooks. Wild pigs are an invasive species that impact at least thirty-five states in the United States with a population of approximately six million and growing. With few natural predators and a high reproduction rate, they are a highly mobile species that can contaminate local waters with soil, fecal materials, and even disease. But can they carry antimicrobial resistance as well? Dr. John Brooks and his team worked with other researchers who are modeling pig behaviors and ecology in order to help quantify just how big of an impact these wild pigs might have. Listen in to learn: How researchers go about capturing wild pigs What attributes make wild pigs well suited to rapid movement and growth What kinds of microbes wild pigs may carry What local landowners can do to help combat the spread of wild pigs If you would like more information about this topic, this episode’s paper is available here: https://doi.org/10.1002/jeq2.20036 It will be freely available from 17 July to 31 July, 2020. If you would like to find transcripts for this episode or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: http://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/ Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don’t forget to subscribe. If you would like to reach out to John, you can find him here: john.brooks@usda.gov https://www.ars.usda.gov/people-locations/person/?person-id=40050 Resources CEU Quiz: http://www.agronomy.org/education/classroom/classes/848 Wild Pig Infor site from Mississippi State University: https://www.wildpiginfo.msstate.edu/ CDC site on Antimicrobial Resistance: https://www.cdc.gov/drugresistance/index.html WHO site on Antimicrobial Resistance: https://www.who.int/health-topics/antimicrobial-resistance Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.
It’s our second birthday today, which means we’re releasing a second blooper reel. We are now also offering continuing education unit (CEU) quizzes for all past, full-length episodes. If you are a certified crop advisor or certified professional soil scientist, you can purchase them on an individual basis or as part of your online classroom subscription. For a full list of the available podcast quizzes, please see this page: https://www.certifiedcropadviser.org/education/classroom/classes/by-category#category28 For more information about the online classroom subscription, please go here: https://www.certifiedcropadviser.org/education/classroom/subscribe If you would like to find transcripts for our episodes or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: http://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/ Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don’t forget to subscribe. Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.
“Impacts of Oyster Aquaculture on Subaqueous Soils and Infauna” with Chelsea Duball. Oysters are praised as ecosystem engineers, not only for their filter feeding, which draws particulate matter and nutrients out of the water, but also for their ability to create natural structures in the wild that can protect against storm surges on the coasts. But, as they expel excess nutrients that they don’t use, is there a potential for an environmental tradeoff, either in soil health or on the other creatures that live within these ecosystems? Chelsea Duball and her team studied oysters in Rhode Island lagoons, researching how much feces oysters could produce at various stocking densities, the short term effects of those feces on soil health, and the long term effects those deposits could have on the tiny creatures that live within oyster farm soils. Tune in to learn: How to collect oyster feces underwater What kind of underwater critters oyster farming can attract What ecological benefits oysters can provide How oyster farming can impact soils both in the short and long term If you would like more information about this topic, this episode’s paper is available here: https://doi.org/10.2134/jeq2019.03.0099  It will be freely available from 19 June to 3 July, 2020. If you would like to find transcripts for this episode or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: http://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/ Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don’t forget to subscribe. If you would like to reach out to Chelsea, you can find her here: cduball@uwyo.edu Twitter: @ChelseaDirtball Instagram: @drawn.from.below Resources CEU Quiz: http://www.agronomy.org/education/classroom/classes/810 "Oysters Clear the Waters, but Do They Muddy the Soil?" CSA News article: https://doi.org/10.1002/csan.20167 Billion Oyster Project: https://www.billionoysterproject.org/ Billion Oyster Project Twitter: https://twitter.com/billionoyster The Nature Conservancy Oyster Reef Restoration: https://www.nature.org/en-us/about-us/where-we-work/united-states/oyster-restoration/ 99% Invisible Oyster-Tecture episode: https://99percentinvisible.org/episode/oyster-tecture/ 99% Invisible Twitter: https://twitter.com/99piorg One to Grow On/Sourceress podcast crossover episode: https://www.onetogrowonpod.com/oysters-real-oyster-cult-american-folk-revival-sourceress/ One to Grow On Podcast Twitter: https://twitter.com/onetogrowonpod Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.
“Evaluation of Water Retention Products to Conserve Urban Water Resources in Home Lawns” with Vikram Baliga. Water retention products are designed to help turfgrasses conserve water. But as water conservation becomes an issue of ever greater importance, it is important not only to know which of these products to use, but also how best to use them within larger water conservation initiatives. Enter Vikram Baliga and his team. In the field, they compared four different water retention products to see which performed best under harsh, drought like conditions. In tandem, they also sent out surveys to homeowners, investigating what kinds of messaging and incentives might best influence homeowner behaviors. If you would like more information about this topic, this episode’s paper is available here: https://dx.doi.org/10.2134/cftm2019.07.0051  It will be freely available from 15 May to 31 May, 2020. If you would like to find transcripts for this episode or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: http://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/ Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don’t forget to subscribe. If you would like to reach out to Vikram, you can find him here: vikram.baliga@ttu.edu planthropologypod@gmail.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/vikbradley If you would like more information on Vikram’s Planthropology podcast, you can find it here: Website: https://www.planthropologypod.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Planthropology_ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Planthropology Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/planthropologypod/ Resources CEU Quiz: http://www.agronomy.org/education/classroom/classes/809 Subscribe to Planthropology: https://castbox.fm/channel/id2470983?country=us City of Lubbock Water Department: https://ci.lubbock.tx.us/departments/water-department Texas Tech University Twitter: https://twitter.com/TexasTech Texas Tech University Plant Resource Database: https://www.depts.ttu.edu/plantresources/ Texas Tech University Greenhouse Twitter: https://twitter.com/TTU_Greenhouse Texas Tech University Greenhouse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/texastechgreenhouse/ Texas Tech University Greenhouse Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/texastechgreenhouse/   Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.
“Crop Production on Heavily Disturbed Soils following Crude Oil Remediation” with Dr. Tom DeSutter and Sam Croat. When an oil spill occurs on land, there are myriad ways to approach cleanup, from adding oxidizers or nutrients to speed natural processes, burning off surface oil, replacing contaminated top soil with top soil from other regions, or even just removing the soil to a landfill. When an oil spill in 2013 contaminated Steve and Patty Jensen’s land with ~860,000 gallons of Bakken crude oil, Dr. Tom DeSutter and then student Sam Croat tested soil mixing and thermal desorption methods, working with the oil companies, landowners, and remediation companies to try to see which methods could best return the Jensen’s land to its original, pre-spill state. Listen in to learn: What are different techniques to cleanup an oil spill How thermal desorption works Who to contact in case of an oil spill How mixing soils can give subsoils the jumpstart they need If you would like more information about this topic, this episode’s paper is available here: https://doi.org/10.1002/agj2.20077 It will be freely available from 17 April to 1 May, 2020. If you would like to find transcripts for this episode or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: http://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/ Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don’t forget to subscribe. If you would like to reach out to Tom, you can find him here: thomas.desutter@ndsu.edu If you would like to reach out to Sam, you can find her here: scroat@stealthnd.com https://www.linkedin.com/in/sam-croat-88171810a https://www.linkedin.com/company/stealth-energy-group Twitter: @SamCroatSoils Resources CEU Quiz: http://www.agronomy.org/education/classroom/classes/793 Soil Science Society of America: https://www.soils.org American Society of Mining and Reclamation: https://www.asmr.us/ Powerpoint slides from ASMR 2019 annual meeting: Soil Reclamation after a Bakken Crude Pipeline Release: A Summary of Research Results at https://www.asmr.us/Meetings/Past-Meetings?y=2019#Content Related papers Croat, S.J., T.M. DeSutter*, F.X.M. Casey, and P.L. O’Brien. 2020. Phosphorus sorption and desorption in soils treated by thermal desorption. Water Air Soil Pollut. O’Brien, P.L., T.M. DeSutter, and F.X.M. Casey. 2019. Natural degradation of low-level petroleum hydrocarbon contamination under crop management. J. Soils Sed. 19:1367-1373 O’Brien, P.L., T.M. DeSutter, F.X.M. Casey, A.L.M. Daigh, J.L. Heitman, N.E. Derby, and E. Khan. 2018. Daytime surface energy fluxes over soil material remediated using thermal desorption. Agrosyst. Geosci. Environ. 1:180027. O’Brien, P.L., T.M. DeSutter, F.X.M. Casey, E. Khan, and A.F. Wick. 2018. Thermal remediation alters soil properties: A review. J. Environ. Mngt. 206: 826-835. O’Brien, P.L., T.M. DeSutter, F.X.M. Casey, A.F. Wick, and E. Khan. 2017. Wheat growth in soils treated by ex situ thermal desorption. J. Environ. Qual. doi:10.2134/jeq2017.03.0115 O’Brien, P.L., T.M. DeSutter, F.X.M. Casey, A.F. Wick, and E. Khan. 2017. Evaluation of soil function following remediation of petroleum hydrocarbons: A review of current remediation strategies. Current Poll. Reports doi:10.1007/s40726-017-0063-7 O’Brien, P.L., T.M. DeSutter, S.S. Ritter, F.X.M. Casey, E. Khan, A.F. Wick, and Heather L. Matthees. 2017. A large-scale soil-mixing process for reclamation of heavily disturbed soils. Ecol. Eng. 109: 84-91. Ritter, S., T. DeSutter, P. O’Brien, F. Casey, A. Wick, E. Khan, and K. Horsager. 2017. Binary exchanges of calcium, magnesium, and potassium on thermally desorbed soil. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 10.2136/sssaj2017.01.0028 O’Brien, P.L., T.M. DeSutter, F.X.M. Casey, N.E. Derby, and A.F. Wick. 2016. Implications of using thermal desorption to remediate contaminated agricultural soil: Physical characteristics and hydraulic processes. J. Environ. Qual. 45: 1430-1436. 5000 Candles song dedicated to Bakken Oil Fields: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=glnWbq0584g Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.
“Crude Oil Effects on Redox Status of Salt Marsh Soil in Louisiana” with Dr. John White. Also featuring Dr. John Pardue. Ten years ago, on April 20th, the Deepwater Horizon oil platform exploded, killing eleven crewmen and releasing about five million barrels of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico and surrounding environment over the next 87 days. Drs. John White and John Pardue have spent much of their careers focusing on the effects of oil on the environment and ways to speed recovery efforts after spills. Join us as we discuss their papers on the relationships between oil, plant health, and microbes, as well as where we are on the road to recovery today. Listen in to learn: The difference between fresh and weathered oil How buried and surface level oil can affect the health of plants The importance of oxygen for microbial breakdown of crude oil Where we are today in the recovery process after Deepwater Horizon If you would like more information about this topic, this episode’s paper is available here: https://dx.doi.org/10.2136/sssaj2016.12.0398  It will be freely available from 3 April to 17 April, 2020. If you would like to find transcripts for this episode or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: http://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/ Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don’t forget to subscribe. If you would like to reach out to John White, you can find him here: jrwhite@lsu.edu If you would like to reach out to John Pardue, you can find him here: jpardue@lsu.edu Resources CEU Quiz: http://www.soils.org/education/classroom/classes/792 “Ten Years after Deepwater Horizon: OilSpill's Impact on Louisiana's Salt Marshes” CSA News Article: https://acsess.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/csan.20104 “Salt Marsh Sediment Biogeochemical Response to the BP Deepwater Horizon Blowout” CSA News Article: https://doi.org/10.2134/csa2014-59-10-5 “Lasting Oil Spill Impacts in Coastal Wetland” CSA News Article: https://doi.org/10.2134/csa2017.62.0810   “How Did Deepwater Horizon’s Spill Affect the Coastal Soils and Wetlands in the Gulf of Mexico?” Soils Matter blog: https://soilsmatter.wordpress.com/2020/04/01/how-did-deepwater-horizons-spill-affect-the-coastal-soils-and-wetlands-in-the-gulf-of-mexico/ “Determining the Impact of Deepwater Horizon’s Spill on Soil” Soils Matter blog: https://soilsmatter.wordpress.com/2020/04/01/determining-the-impact-of-deepwater-horizons-spill-on-soil/ “Deepwater Horizon: What Will the Future Bring?” Soils Matter blog: https://soilsmatter.wordpress.com/2020/04/01/deepwater-horizon-what-will-the-future-bring/ John P.’s article “Biogeochemical controls on biodegradation of buried oil along a coastal headland beach” (free to download until May 9, 2020): https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1alkk,ashxlM1 LSU College of the Coast & Environment Twitter: @LSU_CCE LSU College of Engineering Twitter: @LSUEngineering LSU Civil & Environmental Engineering: @LSU_CEE LSU College of the Coast & Environment Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/LSU-School-of-the-Coast-Environment/432504395174 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) website: https://www.noaa.gov/ Louisiana Oil Spill Coordinator’s Office (LOSCO): http://www.losco.state.la.us/ Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.
“Top 10 Plants: Increasing Awareness of Plants” with Dr. Mary Hockenberry Meyer and Dr. Natalie Bumgarner. Plant blindness is the inability to “see” the plants around us, that is, to recognize them as separate and important pieces of our surroundings beyond their roles as general background or landscape. But for those who do “see” plants and their varied species, how can they communicate that information and passion to those around them? One potential answer? Lists. Drs. Mary Meyer and Natalie Bumgarner are pioneers in this technique, both coordinating with local partners, experts, media, and the public to spearhead Top Ten Plant programs in their states. Listen in to learn: How extension initiatives can bridge gaps between experts and the general public Top tips for spearheading programs in your state or region What kinds of partnerships and resources can develop from these initiatives What plants made the list both in Minnesota and Tennessee If you would like more information about this topic, this episode’s paper is available here: https://doi.org/10.2135/cropsci2019.05.0341  This paper is always freely available. If you would like to find transcripts for this episode or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: http://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/ Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don’t forget to subscribe. If you would like to reach out to Mary, you can find her here: meyer023@umn.edu Twitter: @marygrasses If you would like to reach out to Natalie, you can find her here: nbumgarn@utk.edu Resources CEU Quiz: http://www.agronomy.org/education/classroom/classes/786 Top Ten Plants Minnesota website: http://top10plantsmn.org/ Ten Plants that Changed Minnesota Book: https://www.mnhs.org/mnhspress/books/ten-plants-changed-minnesota Slide Set for Master Gardeners:  http://top10plantsmn.org/resources/ Games from MN program: http://top10plantsmn.org/for-youth/ Teaching Aids/Activities: http://top10plantsmn.org/for-educators/ Top Ten Plants Tennessee website: https://ag.tennessee.edu/plantsciences/Pages/Ten-Plants-That-Shaped-Tennessee.aspx University of Tennessee Plant Sciences YouTube Ten Plants That Shaped Tennessee playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iuDyZ1bJBnM&list=PLd18DtsUS10JMB9fuWb544-bLmT9-MSOK Mary’s Grasstalk Blog: https://grasstalk.wordpress.com University of Minnesota Extension Yard and Garden News: https://blog-yard-garden-news.extension.umn.edu University of Tennessee Horticultural Information: https://www.uthort.com/ University of Tennessee Master Gardeners Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ut_mastergardeners/ University of Minnesota Twitter: @UMNews University of Minnesota Yard & Garden Twitter: @UMNyardgarden University of Minnesota Extension: @UMNExt University of Tennessee Twitter: @UTKnoxville Bill Laws’ book, Fifty Plants that Changed the Course of History: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/fifty-plants-that-changed-the-course-of-history-bill-laws/1102003417#/ Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.
“Analysis of Children's Drawings to Gain Insight into Plant Blindness” with Dr. Christina Hargiss and Dr. Paula Comeau Plant blindness is a phenomenon that, despite its name, has nothing to do with whether or not plants can see. It is actually defined as our inability to see or value the plants around us. Interdisciplinary researchers Drs. Christina Hargiss and Paula Comeau have spent a lot of time digging down to the “roots” of this problem, with research touching anything from psychology to history, cryptography, literature, art and more. This episode, we discuss their work studying plant blindness and mental models in children’s art. Listen to this two part episode to learn more about: What plant blindness is How child psychology and plant blindness research overlap What hurdles researchers face when working with younger study groups How you can fight plant blindness using your grocery store What witch trials, Harry Potter, confederate armies, and cryptography have to do with plant blindness What the next steps are in plant blindness research If you would like more information about this topic, this episode’s paper is available here: https://doi.org/10.4195/nse2019.05.0009  It will be freely available from 4 March to 18 March, 2020. If you would like to find transcripts for this episode or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: http://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/ Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don’t forget to subscribe. If you would like to reach out to Christina, you can find her here: christina.hargiss@ndsu.edu If you would like to reach out to Paula, you can find her here: paula.comeau@ndsu.edu Resources CEU Quiz Part 1: http://www.agronomy.org/education/classroom/classes/784 CEU Quiz Part 2: http://www.agronomy.org/education/classroom/classes/785 CSA News article, “Plant Blindness: How Seeing Green Creates Cultural Disengagement with Agriculture": https://doi.org/10.1002/csan.20056 “Challenges Conducting Research with Adolescents in Public Schools” by Kory Bonnell: dx.doi.org/10.4195/nse2018.01.0002 NDSU Twitter: @NDSU NDSU Natural Resources Management Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ndsu.nrm/ NDSU School of Natural Resource Sciences Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SNRSatNDSU/ Minnesota Scientific and Natural Areas Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MinnesotaSNAs Minnesota Scientific and Natural Areas website: https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/snas/index.html Carnegie Museum of Natural History article by Patrick McShea: https://carnegiemnh.org/plant-blindness/ BBC Article by Christine Ro: https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20190425-plant-blindness-what-we-lose-with-nature-deficit-disorder Plant Science Bulletin: https://www.botany.org/bsa/psb/2001/psb47-1.pdf “Botany and environmental education in elementary school in Brazil: Articulating knowledge, values, and procedures” by Loureiro and Dal-Farra. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2017.1343280 Project Learning Tree: https://www.plt.org/                                                                                                 Project Food, Land, and People: http://www.ncagr.gov/SWC/educational/FLP.html “Preventing Plant Blindness” paper about the poster by Schussler and Wandersee: https://abt.ucpress.edu/content/61/2/82 Native Ways of Knowing:  http://www.ankn.uaf.edu/curriculum/articles/barnhardtkawagley/indigenous_knowledge.html Project Wet: https://www.projectwet.org/ Paperback book Lost Plant! by Elisabeth Schussler and Jim Wandersee: https://www.trafford.com/Bookstore/BookDetail.aspx?BookId=SKU-000199640 Prairie Preschool: https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/state_parks/event.html?id=60556 Growing Together Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GrowingTogetherND/ Growing Together article: https://www.inforum.com/lifestyle/home-and-garden/986012-Growing-Together-Fargos-successful-community-garden-uses-unique-growing-methods-%E2%80%94-and-we-can-all-join, Growing Together, US initiative: https://ruralimmigration.net/project/growing-together/ Free Forest School: https://www.freeforestschool.org/ iNaturalist: https://www.inaturalist.org/ Grocery Store Mythbusters: https://msumspring2017generalbotany.wordpress.com/about/ Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.
“Analysis of Children's Drawings to Gain Insight into Plant Blindness” with Dr. Christina Hargiss and Dr. Paula Comeau Plant blindness is a phenomenon that, despite its name, has nothing to do with whether or not plants can see. It is actually defined as our inability to see or value the plants around us. Interdisciplinary researchers Drs. Christina Hargiss and Paula Comeau have spent a lot of time digging down to the “roots” of this problem, with research touching anything from psychology to history, cryptography, literature, art and more. This episode, we discuss their work studying plant blindness and mental models in children’s art. Listen to this two part episode to learn more about: What plant blindness is How child psychology and plant blindness research overlap What hurdles researchers face when working with younger study groups How you can fight plant blindness using your grocery store What witch trials, Harry Potter, confederate armies, and cryptography have to do with plant blindness What the next steps are in plant blindness research If you would like more information about this topic, this episode’s paper is available here: https://doi.org/10.4195/nse2019.05.0009  It will be freely available from 4 March to 18 March, 2020. If you would like to find transcripts for this episode or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: http://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/ Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don’t forget to subscribe. If you would like to reach out to Christina, you can find her here: christina.hargiss@ndsu.edu If you would like to reach out to Paula, you can find her here: paula.comeau@ndsu.edu Resources CEU Quiz Part 1: http://www.agronomy.org/education/classroom/classes/784 CEU Quiz Part 2: http://www.agronomy.org/education/classroom/classes/785 CSA News article, “Plant Blindness: How Seeing Green Creates Cultural Disengagement with Agriculture": https://doi.org/10.1002/csan.20056 “Challenges Conducting Research with Adolescents in Public Schools” by Kory Bonnell: dx.doi.org/10.4195/nse2018.01.0002 NDSU Twitter: @NDSU NDSU Natural Resources Management Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ndsu.nrm/ NDSU School of Natural Resource Sciences Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SNRSatNDSU/ Minnesota Scientific and Natural Areas Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MinnesotaSNAs Minnesota Scientific and Natural Areas website: https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/snas/index.html Carnegie Museum of Natural History article by Patrick McShea: https://carnegiemnh.org/plant-blindness/ BBC Article by Christine Ro: https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20190425-plant-blindness-what-we-lose-with-nature-deficit-disorder Plant Science Bulletin: https://www.botany.org/bsa/psb/2001/psb47-1.pdf “Botany and environmental education in elementary school in Brazil: Articulating knowledge, values, and procedures” by Loureiro and Dal-Farra. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13504622.2017.1343280   Project Learning Tree: https://www.plt.org/                                                                                                    Project Food, Land, and People: http://www.ncagr.gov/SWC/educational/FLP.html “Preventing Plant Blindness” paper about the poster by Schussler and Wandersee: https://abt.ucpress.edu/content/61/2/82 Native Ways of Knowing:  http://www.ankn.uaf.edu/curriculum/articles/barnhardtkawagley/indigenous_knowledge.html Project Wet: https://www.projectwet.org/ Paperback book Lost Plant! by Elisabeth Schussler and Jim Wandersee: https://www.trafford.com/Bookstore/BookDetail.aspx?BookId=SKU-000199640 Prairie Preschool: https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/state_parks/event.html?id=60556 Growing Together Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GrowingTogetherND/ Growing Together article: https://www.inforum.com/lifestyle/home-and-garden/986012-Growing-Together-Fargos-successful-community-garden-uses-unique-growing-methods-%E2%80%94-and-we-can-all-join, Growing Together, US initiative: https://ruralimmigration.net/project/growing-together/ Free Forest School: https://www.freeforestschool.org/ iNaturalist: https://www.inaturalist.org/ Grocery Store Mythbusters: https://msumspring2017generalbotany.wordpress.com/about/ Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.
The organic industry generates 50 billion dollar a year. But if you’re looking at transitioning into organic farming, where do you begin? Anders Gurda and Paul Dietmann work with organic farmers every day. Join us with host Dr. Erin Silva for part two of our four part series on transitioning to organic farming, where we discuss how to improve your organic business, how to navigate the financials of switching, and where to find the best buyers for your grains. Listen in to learn: How teaming up with your fellow organic farmers can improve your business What barriers (perceived or real) can keep farmers from transitioning to organic What benefits crop consultants and agronomists can offer to growers looking to transition How to navigate the financials of a wise transition, including cash flow, capital purchases, and timelines If you would like to find transcripts for this episode or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: http://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/ Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don’t forget to subscribe. If you would like to reach out to Anders, you can find him here: https://www.pipelinefoods.com/minneapolis-team#anders-gurda https://twitter.com/AndersGurda https://twitter.com/PipelineFoods Email: agurda@pipelinefoods.com If you would like to reach out to Paul, you can find him here: Email: Paul.Dietmann@compeer.com If you would like to reach out to Erin, you can find her here: Twitter: @Emsilva624 emsilva@wisc.edu Resources CEU Quiz: http://www.agronomy.org/education/classroom/classes/777 Managing through the Organic Transition in Grain Crop Production Webinar Series: https://www.agronomy.org/education/classroom/classes/658 Turning Grain into Dough: https://www.cias.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/graintodoughfinal071119web.pdf Pipeline Foods: https://www.pipelinefoods.com/pipeline-team Pipeline Foods Farm Profit Program: https://www.pipelinefoods.com/about-the-fpp Compeer Financial: https://www.compeer.com/ OGRAIN Compass: https://ograin.cals.wisc.edu/resources/ograin-compass/ OGRAIN Conference: https://ograin.cals.wisc.edu/events/ OGRAIN Resources: https://ograin.cals.wisc.edu/resources/organic-grain-resource-list/ OGRAIN Field Days: https://ograin.cals.wisc.edu/events/prior-ograin-events/ Moses Organic Farming Conference: https://mosesorganic.org/conference/ Moses Organic Field Days: https://mosesorganic.org/events/organic-field-days/ Moses Farmer-to-Farmer Mentoring Program: https://mosesorganic.org/projects/mentor-program/ Farm Profit Program Into the Weeds podcast: https://www.pipelinefoods.com/into-the-weeds-podcast Land Connection Field Days: https://thelandconnection.org/workshops-2/ Practical Farmers of Iowa Field Days: https://practicalfarmers.org/events/field-days/ NCR SARE: https://www.northcentralsare.org/ This material is based upon work that is supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture, under award number 2018-38640-28416 through the North Central Region SARE program under project number ENC18-166. USDA is an equal opportunity employer and service provider. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.
In North America, standards for soil health and fertility in organic systems are regulated at the federal level. But for those transitioning to organic farming, it can be difficult to know how to meet those standards without access to the same toolkit they used while practicing conventional farming. Join us and moderator Chris Boomsma in this last installment of our four part series on transitioning to organic farming, where we discuss tips and trends to organically manage soil health, fertility, and biology, as well as some closing thoughts from series moderator Dr. Erin Silva. Tune in to learn more about: What are the current regional and national trends in organic farming How manure and cover crops can be used in nutrient cycling in organic systems What the current literature has to say about organic management of key nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus Why soil biology and soil health is crucial to organic systems If you would like to find transcripts for this episode or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: http://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/ Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don’t forget to subscribe. If you would like to reach out to Erin, you can find her here: Twitter: @Emsilva624 emsilva@wisc.edu If you would like to reach out to Chris, you can find him here: cboomsma@sciencesocieties.org Resources CEU Quiz: http://www.agronomy.org/education/classroom/classes/779 Managing through the Organic Transition in Grain Crop Production Webinar Series: https://www.agronomy.org/education/classroom/classes/658 Agronomy Journal review paper: dx.doi.org/10.2134/agronj2019.04.0275 OGRAIN: https://ograin.cals.wisc.edu/ NCR SARE: https://www.northcentralsare.org/ This material is based upon work that is supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture, under award number 2018-38640-28416 through the North Central Region SARE program under project number ENC18-166. USDA is an equal opportunity employer and service provider. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.
Tom Frantzen has been in organic agriculture for thirty years with his wife Irene in Iowa. Join us and host Dr. Erin Silva for part three of our four part series on transitioning to organic farming, where we’ll discuss his introduction and transition to organic farming, lessons he’s learned, the values and disciplines he treasures, and the changes he’s seen in organic farming over the decades. Tune in to learn more about: The benefits of holistic management Why it’s important to match what you value and what you do How owning and caring for livestock can help your crop rotations Why discipline and long-term thinking is crucial in organic farming How plant breeding is advancing organic farming If you would like to find transcripts for this episode or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: http://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/ Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don’t forget to subscribe. If you would like to reach out to Erin, you can find her here: Twitter: @Emsilva624 emsilva@wisc.edu Resources CEU Quiz Link: http://www.agronomy.org/education/classroom/classes/778 Managing through the Organic Transition in Grain Crop Production Webinar Series: https://www.agronomy.org/education/classroom/classes/658 Land Stewardship Project: https://landstewardshipproject.org/ Practical Farmers of Iowa: https://practicalfarmers.org/ Allan Savory’s book, Holistic Management: A Commonsense Revolution to Restore Our Environment: https://savory-institute.myshopify.com/collections/holistic-management-books OGRAIN Conference: https://ograin.cals.wisc.edu/events/ NCR SARE: https://www.northcentralsare.org/ This material is based upon work that is supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture, under award number 2018-38640-28416 through the North Central Region SARE program under project number ENC18-166. USDA is an equal opportunity employer and service provider. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.
Episode Title: Organic Certifications with Harriet Behar Show notes: Getting organically certified is one of the first and most important steps to transitioning to organic farming, but how does one actually go about it? Harriet Behar has worked in organic systems for over thirty years and is an expert on the regulations, processes, and requirements for getting organically certified. Join us and host Dr. Erin Silva as we discuss this crucial process in part one of our four part series on transitioning to organic farming. Tune in to learn more about: What goes into creating an Organic System Plan How knowing the requirements ahead of time can save time when transitioning to organic farming How to avoid comingling of organic and non-organic crops and seeds in parallel organic and conventional operations What happens during an organic inspection How crop rotations differ in conventional and organic systems If you would like to find transcripts for this episode or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: http://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/ Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don’t forget to subscribe. If you would like to reach out to Harriet, you can find her here: harriet.organic@gmail.com If you would like to reach out to Erin, you can find her here: Twitter: @Emsilva624 emsilva@wisc.edu Resources CEU Quiz: https://www.agronomy.org/education/classroom/classes/776 Managing through the Organic Transition in Grain Crop Production Webinar Series: https://www.agronomy.org/education/classroom/classes/658 OGRAIN: https://ograin.cals.wisc.edu/ OGRAIN Resources: https://ograin.cals.wisc.edu/resources/ OGRAIN Winter Conference: https://ograin.cals.wisc.edu/events/ OGRAIN YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbIqPECXj3WfeUEjYGAgdYg OGRAIN Field Days: https://ograin.cals.wisc.edu/events/prior-ograin-events/ Moses Organic Certifier list: https://mosesorganic.org/organic-certification/ Moses Fact Sheets: https://mosesorganic.org/publications/organic-fact-sheets/ Moses Farmer-to-Farmer Mentoring Program: https://mosesorganic.org/projects/mentor-program/ Moses Organic Field Days: https://mosesorganic.org/events/organic-field-days/ Practical Farmers of Iowa: https://practicalfarmers.org/ Practical Farmers of Iowa Field Days: https://practicalfarmers.org/events/field-days/ Land Stewardship Project: https://landstewardshipproject.org/ Land Connection: https://thelandconnection.org/ Land Connection Field Days: https://thelandconnection.org/workshops-2/ Michael Fields Agricultural Institute: https://michaelfields.org/ National Organic Program website: https://www.ams.usda.gov/about-ams/programs-offices/national-organic-program NCR SARE: https://www.northcentralsare.org/ This material is based upon work that is supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture, under award number 2018-38640-28416 through the North Central Region SARE program under project number ENC18-166. USDA is an equal opportunity employer and service provider. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.
“Genome-Wide Association Studies in Apple Reveal Loci for Aroma Volatiles, Sugar Composition, and Harvest Date” with Dr. Zoë Migicovsky, Dr. Carsten Pedersen Apple breeding can take a long time. Because each seed is the progeny of two different trees and each tree takes five to six years to produce its first fruits, breeders can be waiting years, if not decades, to see the results of their hard work. Drs. Zoë Migicovsky and Carsten Pedersen are working to change that. By comparing the genomes of varying apple cultivars and their phenotypic data (traits you can discern via the five senses), Zoë and Carsten aim to pinpoint which genes are responsible for which traits. With that information, simple DNA testing may be able to shave years off of each round of breeding, helping breeders create better apples for your shelves in far less time. Listen in to learn: What is a genome wide association study? What is the Pometum? Why is it important to pair both genomic and phenotypic data? How can knowing differing sugar ratios improve apple products, such as ciders or wines? If you would like more information about this topic, this episode’s paper is available here: https://doi.org/10.3835/plantgenome2018.12.0104  This paper is always freely available. If you would like to find transcripts for this episode or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: http://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/ Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don’t forget to subscribe. If you would like to reach out to Zoë, you can find her here: Zoe.Migicovsky@Dal.Ca Twitter: @Zoemig Her lab Twitter: @foodimprover http://www.zoemigicovsky.com/ If you would like to reach out to Carsten, you can find him here: cpr@plen.ku.dk Resources CEU Quiz: http://www.agronomy.org/education/classroom/classes/818  Dalhousie University site: http://www.cultivatingdiversity.org/ Zoe’s personal site: http://www.zoemigicovsky.com/ The Pometum: https://plen.ku.dk/english/about/pfv/the-pometum/ The apple key: https://www.nordgen.org/nak/?chglang=ENG Crowd breeding program (in Danish): https://pometet.dk/projekter/aebleoasen/ Related Papers: “Genome to Phenome Mapping in Apple Using Historical Data”: dx.doi.org/10.3835/plantgenome2015.11.0113 “Using Living Germplasm Collections to Characterize, Improve, and Conserve Woody Perennials”: dx.doi.org/10.2135/cropsci2019.05.0353 “Genome-wide association studies in apple reveal loci of large effect controlling apple polyphenols”: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41438-019-0190-y “Population structure, relatedness and ploidy levels in an apple gene bank revealed through genotyping-by-sequencing”: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0201889 Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.
“Winter Phosphorus Release from Cover Crops and Linkages with Runoff Chemistry” with Dr. Merrin Macrae Cover crops can offer a variety of ecosystem services, including reducing soil erosion. However, in colder climates, where cover crops can freeze and die over the winter, there is the possibility that the Phosphorus within cover crops can then leach into surface runoff. Dr. Merrin Macrae and her team decided to dive deep and discover whether or not this trade-off exists and, if so, to what extent. Listen to learn: What do Nalgene bottles and ping pong balls have to do with research? What is it like to do field research in the winter? How can Twitter lead to working research relationships with farmers? Which factors contribute most to surface P runoff? If you would like more information about this topic, this episode’s paper is available here: https://doi.org/10.2134/jeq2018.08.0307  This paper is always freely available. If you would like to find transcripts for this episode or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: http://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/ Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don’t forget to subscribe. If you would like to reach out to Merrin, you can find her here: mmacrae@uwaterloo.ca Twitter: @merrinm Resources CEU Quiz: http://www.agronomy.org/education/classroom/classes/817  Intro to the Special Section from the Journal of Environmental Quality: Agricultural Water Quality in Cold Environments, “Agricultural Water Quality in Cold Climates: Processes, Drivers, Management Options, and Research Needs”: dx.doi.org/10.2134/jeq2019.05.0220 “Agricultural Water Quality in Cold Climates: Processes, Drivers, Management Options, and Research Needs”: dx.doi.org/10.2134/jeq2019.05.0220 Papers from Merrin’s Masters students James Cober and Tatianna Lozier: “Nutrient Release from Living and Terminated Cover Crops Under Variable Freeze–Thaw Cycles”: dx.doi.org/10.2134/agronj2017.08.0449  “Release of phosphorus from crop residue and cover crops over the non-growing season in a cool temperate region”: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0378377417301579 “Potential phosphorus mobilization from above-soil winter vegetation assessed from laboratory water extractions following freeze–thaw cycles”: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07011784.2017.1331140 Other papers from this team: Agricultural Water Futures Project: https://uwaterloo.ca/agricultural-water-futures/ “Impacts of Cover Crops and Crop Residues on Phosphorus Losses in Cold Climates: A Review” review article from Jian Liu: dx.doi.org/10.2134/jeq2019.03.0119 Papers from Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Environment Canada: “Evaluating the potential contribution of vegetation as a nutrient source in snowmelt runoff”: https://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/full/10.4141/cjss2012-050#.Xd2KSehKhhF “Critical Factors Affecting Field-Scale Losses of Nitrogen and Phosphorus in Spring Snowmelt Runoff in the Canadian Prairies”: dx.doi.org/10.2134/jeq2012.0385 European and Nordic Papers: “Freezing–thawing effects on phosphorus leaching from catch crops”: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10705-014-9615-z “Freeze–Thaw Effects on Phosphorus Loss in Runoff from Manured and Catch-Cropped Soils”: dx.doi.org/10.2134/jeq2004.0415 Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.
“Plant Species and Hydrology as Controls on Constructed Wetland Methane Fluxes” with Karla Jarecke and Dr. Terry Loecke Wetlands are important ecosystems that provide many important services, such as assisting in water quality, flood control, erosion protection, carbon removal and storage, and biodiversity. Hydrology is the study of water, specifically in how it moves throughout the landscape. Combine them with the conundrum of methane production in wetland plant species, and you’ve got the makings of a fascinating research project. Specifically, Karla Jarecke and Terry Loecke’s project. By testing methane production in two common wetland species under both lab and field conditions, they worked to answer important questions about not only how methane production, hydrology, and wetland species work together, but also how we can better plan for the creation and care of constructed wetlands. Listen in to learn about: The lifecycle of methane within wetlands The different kinds of flora and fauna that live in them How a parks program turned a would-be landfill into a new wetland How field and lab conditions can differ, both in logistics and results If you would like more information about this topic, this episode’s paper is available here: https://doi.org/10.2136/sssaj2018.11.0421  It will be freely available from 15 Nov. to 29 Nov., 2019. If you would like to find transcripts for this episode or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: https://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/ Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don’t forget to subscribe. If you would like to reach out to Karla, you can find her here: karla.jarecke@oregonstate.edu @KarlaJarecke If you would like to reach out to Terry, you can find him here: Loecke.terry@ku.edu @Loecke1 Resources: CEU Quiz: http://www.agronomy.org/education/classroom/classes/816  EPA: https://www.epa.gov/ Society of Wetland Scientists: https://www.sws.org Five Rivers MetroParks Twitter: @MetroParksTweet For Landowners: USDA: https://www.usda.gov/ Wetland Mitigation and Conservation Compliance: https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/national/programs/farmbill/?cid=nrcseprd362686 For Individuals: eBird: https://ebird.org/home National Audobon Society: https://www.audubon.org/ Ducks Unlimited: https://www.ducks.org/ The Nature Conservancy: https://www.nature.org/en-us/ Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.
“What We Talk about When We Talk about Soil Health” with Dr. Ryan Stewart. Soil health is an important topic for today’s scientists, but how do we quantify it, and when we talk about “healthy soils,” what do we even mean? Dr. Ryan Stewart and his team set out to answer just that. Doing a meta-analysis on dozens of studies listed in The Soil Health Institute’s Research Landscape Tool, Ryan and his team compared different soil health indicators to determine what scientists are measuring, how they’re measuring it, and which are the most valuable in actual determining soil health. Join us to learn: How measuring soil health is similar to measuring health in humans What kinds of soil health indicators scientists measure How these indicators can be grouped and compared across multiple studies Which indicators are the most helpful in measuring soil health If you would like more information about this topic, this episode’s paper is available here: https://doi.org/10.2134/ael2018.06.0033  This paper is always freely available. If you would like to find transcripts for this episode or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: https://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/ Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don’t forget to subscribe. If you would like to reach out to Ryan, you can find him here: ryan.stewart@vt.edu @CriticalZoneLab Resources CEU Quiz: http://www.agronomy.org/education/classroom/classes/815  Agricultural & Environmental Letters Journal Soil Health Calculator: https://soilhealth.spes.vt.edu/CoverCropCalculator.html Virginia Tech Soil Health Website: https://soilhealth.spes.vt.edu/ NRCS fact sheets: https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/soils/health/ Soil Health Institute: https://soilhealthinstitute.org/ Soil Health Institute Research Landscape Tool: http://www.soilhealthinstituteresearch.org/Home/Search Soil Health Institute Conferences and Meetings: https://soilhealthinstitute.org/events/ Soil Health Institute Soil Health Indicators: https://soilhealthinstitute.org/north-american-project-to-evaluate-soil-health-measurements/ SARE: https://www.sare.org/ SARE Cover Crops Economic Bulletin: https://www.sare.org/Learning-Center/Bulletins/Cover-Crop-Economics USDA Soil Health Indicators: https://directives.sc.egov.usda.gov/OpenNonWebContent.aspx?content=43754.wba Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.
“Celebrating the 350th Anniversary of Phosphorus Discovery: A Conundrum of Deficiency and Excess” with Drs. Andrew Sharpley, Helen Jarvie, Don Flaten, and Peter Kleinman. 350 years ago, German alchemist Hennig Brandt accidentally discovered phosphorus during his quest to find the philosopher’s stone. As it turns out, phosphorus can’t turn base metals into gold, but it is one of the most important elements for sustaining life on earth. Join us for this episode as we discuss the discovery of phosphorus, its uses, how we harvest it, and interesting facts about its storied past. Listen to find answers to questions such as: How was phosphorus originally discovered? Why was it called the “Devil’s Element”? What do urine, guano, and human bones have to do with mining phosphorus methods? How can we efficiently and wisely manage phosphorus today? If you would like more information about this topic, this episode’s paper is freely available here: https://doi.org/10.2134/jeq2018.05.0170  This article is always freely available. If you would like to find transcripts for this episode or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: https://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/ Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don’t forget to subscribe. If you would like to reach out to Andrew, you can find him here: Sharpley@uark.edu https://experts.uark.edu/experts/2114/andrew-sharpley If you would like to reach out to Don, you can find him here: Don.Flaten@umanitoba.ca Twitter: @donflaten1 If you would like to reach out to Helen, you can find her here: hpj@ceh.ac.uk https://www.ceh.ac.uk/staff/helen-jarvie If you would like to reach out to Peter, you can find him here: peter.kleinman@ars.usda.gov Resources CEU Quiz: http://www.agronomy.org/education/classroom/classes/819  JEQ Special Section: https://acsess.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/15372537/2019/48/5#heading-level-1-1 Phosphorus Week Blogs “The Discovery and General Uses of Phosphorus” by Andrew Sharpley: https://soilsmatter.wordpress.com/2019/09/15/the-discovery-and-general-uses-of-phosphorus “Why is Phosphorus Needed on Farms?” by Peter Kleinman: https://soilsmatter.wordpress.com/2019/09/15/why-is-phosphorus-needed-on-farms “What are the Sources of Phosphorus for Crops?” by Don Flaten: https://soilsmatter.wordpress.com/2019/09/15/what-are-sources-of-phosphorus-for-crops “What are the Challenges Regarding Phosphorus Use?” by Helen Jarvie: https://soilsmatter.wordpress.com/2019/09/15/what-are-the-challenges-regarding-phosphorus-use “Ten Things We All Can Do to Manage Phosphorus Better” by Don Flaten: https://soilsmatter.wordpress.com/2019/09/15/ten-things-we-can-do-to-manage-phosphorus-better 4R Nutrient Stewardship from The Fertilizer Institute: https://www.nutrientstewardship.com/4rs/ SERA-17: https://sera17.org/ 4R Plus: https://www.4rplus.org/ Discovery farms: https://aaes.uark.edu/centers-and-programs/discovery-farm-program/ Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.
“Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Saturated Riparian Buffers: Are We Trading a Water Quality Problem for an Air Quality Problem?” with Dr. Morgan Davis and Dr. Tyler Groh. Riparian buffers are areas of perennial vegetation planted around stream banks and other riparian zones to protect against soil erosion and nutrient leaching. However, tile drainage systems—piping laid under fields to keep them from becoming too saturated—are designed to bypass riparian buffers, leading to potentially harmful levels of nutrient leaching. Saturated Riparian Buffers are a relatively new conservation technique that aims to reduce those water quality issues by redirecting excess water back into the soil. However, their installation could potentially lead to increased levels of incomplete denitrification, resulting in excess nitrous oxide, a potent greenhouse gas, being released into the atmosphere. Drs. Morgan Davis and Tyler Groh work together to examine saturated buffer design and these potential environmental tradeoffs. This episode, listen in to find answers to the following questions: What is tile drainage, and how is it installed? How does denitrification work, and why is it a necessary process? In what ways can we attempt to improve saturated riparian buffer design? Is there really a tradeoff in air and water quality when installing saturated riparian buffers? If you would like more information about this topic, this episode’s paper is available here: https://doi.org/10.2134/jeq2018.03.0127  It will be freely available from 16 August to 30 August, 2019. If you would like to find transcripts for this episode or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: https://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/ Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don’t forget to subscribe. If you would like to reach out to Morgan, you can find him here: morgand@iastate.edu Twitter: @morgandpdavisbgc If you would like to reach out to Tyler, you can find him here: tgroh@iastate.edu Twitter: @TylerAGroh Resources CEU Quiz: http://www.agronomy.org/education/classroom/classes/834  In Situ Denitrification in Saturated Riparian Buffers article by Tyler A. Groh, Morgan P. Davis, et. al.: http://dx.doi.org/10.2134/jeq2018.03.0125 NRCS Conservation Practice Standard for Saturated Buffers: https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/PA_NRCSConsumption/download?cid=nrcseprd1051806&ext=pdf Transforming Drainage Website: https://transformingdrainage.org/ The Soil and Water Conservation Society website on saturated riparian buffers: https://www.swcs.org/resources/conservation-media-library/saturated-buffer-facts Environmental Protection Agency’s website on greenhouse gas emissions: https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/sources-greenhouse-gas-emissions Managing Denitrification in Agronomic Systems Community: https://www.agronomy.org/membership/communities/managing-denitrification-in-agronomic-systems 2019 Annual ACS Meeting in San Antonio, Texas: https://www.acsmeetings.org/ 2019 Annual Meeting Oral Session for Managing Denitrification in Agronomic Systems: https://scisoc.confex.com/scisoc/2019am/meetingapp.cgi/Session/19300 Intergovernmental panel on climate change: https://www.ipcc.ch/ Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.
“Effects of Biomass Removal Levels on Soil Carbon and Nutrient Reserves in Conifer-Dominated, Coarse-Textured Sites in Northern Ontario: 20-Year Results” with Dr. Dave Morris Forest harvesting varies greatly from annual harvests of agricultural crops, with extended times between harvests, the amount of harvested material removed, and the degree of site disturbance. Trees can grow to impressive sizes, but can take up to 60 years or more to reach a merchantable size. Because of these factors, the potential impact of these forest harvest operations on the environmental conditions needed for successful tree regeneration and growth can be substantial. Dr. Dave Morris, in collaboration with colleagues from the Canadian Forest Service, have been examining the potential impacts of forest biomass removal on the sustainability of these harvesting practices. With his team from the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry in Canada and sites from across the North American Long-term Soil Productivity Network, he’s spent 25-years looking at how forest soils and the regenerating forest recover after different intensities of forest biomass removal.  Tune in to learn more about: How does the removal of forest biomass affect the health of soil and the regenerating forest? How does the forest “recover” after stand-replacing disturbances? How do foresters try to minimize environmental impact? How does one coordinate a 25-year research project? If you would like more information about this topic, this episode’s paper is available here: https://doi.org/10.2136/sssaj2018.08.0306  It will be freely available from 19 July to 2 August, 2019. If you would like to find transcripts for this episode or sign up for our newsletter, please visit our website: https://fieldlabearth.libsyn.com/ Contact us at podcast@sciencesocieties.org or on Twitter @FieldLabEarth if you have comments, questions, or suggestions for show topics, and if you want more content like this don’t forget to subscribe. If you would like to reach out to Dave, you can find him here: dave.m.morris@ontario.ca Listener Survey As a reminder, we are running a listener survey until July 27. Listeners who complete the survey and join our newsletter will get a free, exclusive loyal listener sticker. You can complete the survey here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/N8V2YSL Resources CEU Quiz: http://www.soils.org/education/classroom/classes/813  Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry: https://www.ontario.ca/page/ministry-natural-resources-and-forestry Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ONresources/posts/2121303117916894 Dead wood facebook post: https://www.facebook.com/ONresources/photos/a.735069293206957/1796941180353091/?type=3 #MNRFScience on social media Local Citizens Committees: https://www.ontario.ca/page/forest-management-planning Field, Lab, Earth is copyrighted to the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.
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Podcast Details

Created by
ASA, CSSA, SSSA
Podcast Status
Active
Started
Jun 13th, 2018
Latest Episode
Oct 16th, 2020
Release Period
Monthly
Episodes
44
Avg. Episode Length
38 minutes
Explicit
No
Order
Episodic

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