Marginalia

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"Call me Ishmael." Whether you've read it or not, you probably recognize that as the first line of Herman Melville's Moby-Dick. It's also the name of a book project founded by Stephanie Kent & Logan Smalley.
I had a conversation with Oliver Jeffers on Zoom on October 7, because his picture book, What We’ll Build , was released in bookstores the day before. Jeffers has many picture book fans and full disclosure, I am one of them. But I’m also a fan of his fine art. We talked about all of it, including his philosophy on walls, the pandemic, and the other. Here’s our conversation: - What We'll Build by Oliver Jeffers is published by Philomel Books. Marginalia was produced at KMUW Wichita. If you like this podcast, please consider leaving a rating or review on Apple Podcasts . Engineers: Mark Statzer and Torin Andersen Editor: Lu Anne Stephens Producer: Beth Golay Follow Beth Golay on Twitter @BethGolay .
Why did I ask Fredrik Backman how to pronounce Ove? Well, Ove is the title character his bestselling novel, A Man Called Ove .
The Big Door Prize , the new novel by M.O. Walsh, poses this question to its readers: What would you do if you knew your life’s potential? Characters in the small town of Deerfield, Louisiana, are faced with this question when a mysterious machine appears in the local grocery store, reading and analyzing DNA, and inevitably challenging residents to gaze inward, searching for unrealized potential. As as fan of Walsh’s first novel, My Sunshine Away , I was very excited to to visit with M.O. Walsh about this new novel, The Big Door Prize. Here’s our conversation: - The Big Door Prize by M.O. Walsh is published by Dutton. Marginalia was produced at KMUW Wichita. If you like this podcast, please consider leaving a rating or review on Apple Podcasts . Engineers: Mark Statzer and Torin Andersen Editor: Lu Anne Stephens Producer: Beth Golay Follow Beth Golay on Twitter @BethGolay .
Daniel Hornsby novel, Via Negativa , takes readers on a journey across the midwest with Fr. Dan, the narrator of the book. Along the way, Fr. Dan picks up a wounded coyote and tries to nurse it back to health in the back of his Toyota Camry. The premise sounds simple enough, but weaves into the story medieval texts, current scandals, and perhaps most complicated of all, faith. I recently spoke with Hornsby about Via Negativa . Here’s our conversation: - Via Negativa by Daniel Hornsby is published by Knopf. Marginalia was produced at KMUW Wichita. If you like this podcast, please consider leaving a rating or review on Apple Podcasts . Engineers: Mark Statzer and Torin Andersen Editor: Lu Anne Stephens Producer: Beth Golay Follow Beth Golay on Twitter @BethGolay .
My conversation today is with Hank Green. Many fans recognize Hank as one of the Vlogbrothers and the continuing conversation he has with his brother John Green. You might recognize him as the author of An Absolutely Remarkable Thing and former guest right here on Marginalia. Hank recently published a sequel, A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor . We avoid spoilers, so I can tell you it’s a sequel. We actually talk about the book and so much more. Here’s our conversation: Hank and his brother, John, are raising money to dramatically and systematically improve maternal health care in Sierra Leone, where, if trends continue, one in seventeen women will die in childbirth. You can join them at PIH.org/hankandjohn. - A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor: A Novel by Hank Green is published by Dutton. Marginalia was produced at KMUW Wichita. If you like this podcast, please consider leaving a rating or review on Apple Podcasts . Engineers: Mark Statzer and Torin Andersen Editor: Lu Anne Stephens Producer
I begin this episode of Marginalia a bit red in the face. You see, I interviewed Jenny Offill about her novel, Weather , on March 6. It was the last interview I conducted in-studio at the station. The next week we started working from home.
What would a world look like where only two people remain?
I recently had a conversation with Rufi Thorpe about her book, The Knockout Queen . At its most basic level, it’s a book about friendship. But that’s just one of the many themes we could have explored. It's also about sexuality. It’s about fitting in. It’s about how we don’t always do the right thing. And then there’s Thorpe’s writing. Somehow it’s simultaneously accessible and sophisticated. She has a way of respecting people's desires and fragilities as legitimate. There are so many things to unpack here, just as there were when we started our conversation. So I’m going to start as I did that day. Here’s Rufi Thorpe giving me the elevator speech for The Knockout Queen . - The Knockout Queen by Rufi Thorpe is published by Knopf. Marginalia was produced at KMUW Wichita. If you like this podcast, please consider leaving a rating or review on Apple Podcasts . Engineers: Mark Statzer and Torin Andersen Editor: Lu Anne Stephens Producer: Beth Golay Follow Beth Golay on Twitter @BethGolay .
Luke Geddes has written a novel set in Wichita. Since KMUW is based in Wichita, that’s an oddity worth pointing out. The novel, Heart of Junk , is about a group of antique mall booth owners and the world of collectibles—a world Geddes discovered when he spent a couple years in Wichita earning an MFA from Wichita State University. Heart of Junk is filled with humor, sadness, and cynicism. I wondered if Geddes’s time in Wichita was filled with the same. Here’s our conversation. - Heart of Junk by Luke Geddes is published by Simon & Schuster. Marginalia was produced at KMUW Wichita. If you like this podcast, please consider leaving a rating or review on Apple Podcasts . Engineers: Mark Statzer and Torin Andersen Editor: Lu Anne Stephens Producer: Beth Golay Follow Beth Golay on Twitter @BethGolay .
Diana Arterian is the Spring 2020 Visiting Emerging Poet at Wichita State University. Her book, Playing Monster :: Seiche, is a book-length poem, a blending of two collections, tackling abuse by her father and anxiety about her mother's stalker.
In her debut novel, Kiley Reid tackles the subjects of race, social media, #BlackLivesMatter, misconception, misunderstanding… all without casting judgement.
Since his novel, The Eyre Affair , was released in 2002, Jasper Fforde has been entertaining fans with novels that he describes as incorporating a narrative dare. Jasper Fforde’s novel Early Riser will be released in paperback in the coming weeks and he explained to me that Early Riser ’s narrative dare is that it’s set in a world where humans have always hibernated. Fforde and I spoke about Early Riser and so much more. Here's our conversation: - Early Riser by Jasper Fforde is published by Penguin. Marginalia was produced at KMUW Wichita. If you like this podcast, please consider leaving a rating or review on Apple Podcasts . Engineers: Mark Statzer and Torin Andersen Editor: Lu Anne Stephens Producer: Beth Golay Follow Beth Golay on Twitter @BethGolay .
It's often said that fact is stranger than fiction. Dexter Palmer took fact and created fiction in Mary Toft; or, The Rabbit Queen, a fictional story based on a factual Mary Toft who, in 1726, convinced the medical community that she was giving birth to rabbits.
Today is the final day of 2019, and I imagine you’re growing tired of “best of” lists. Best of the year. Best of the decade. But aren’t these lists important? I mean, how can one be expected to grow without reflection and resolution? When I look back at my 2019 reading life, I see that I read 62 books, probably abandoned even more, listened to 13 audio books, analyzed more poetry than I’ve ever read before in my life, and interviewed 35 authors for Marginalia . I recently sat down with Suzanne Tobias, opinion writer at The Wichita Eagle and our book reviewer here at KMUW. We were each armed with a list of our top 10 reads for the year. Not published in 2019, but read in 2019. My list surprised even me. Only four were books of my choosing, by authors interviewed for the Marginalia podcast. Four favorites were forced upon me as texts for my English Lit classes. And two stemmed from a reading challenge. That was also new for me: reading challenges. As in plural. I’ve been participating in
Author Ruta Sepetys is often referred to as the seeker of lost stories. She has written four works of historical fiction published in over sixty countries and forty languages. Her latest, The Fountains of Silence , is set in 1957 Madrid and explores Spain living under the dictatorship of General Francisco Franco. Sepetys is considered a “crossover” novelist because her books are read by both students and adults worldwide. I caught up with her recently to visit about the book and about writing for young adults.
Even if you’ve been reading books for young readers in the United States for a number of years, chances are you still are not aware of Andy Griffiths. But he is considered by many the most popular and one of the best-selling author for young readers in Australia.
Randall Munroe is the creator of the website xkcd.com and the author of the books What If? , Thing Explainer , and his latest, How To: Absurd Scientific Advice for Common Real-World Problems .
When most readers hear the name Tracy Chevalier, they correctly remember her as the author of Girl with a Pearl Earring , which was her second of eleven published novels. Her latest is titled A Single Thread, which explores a group of women who, after World War I, were charged with embroidering cushions and kneelers for Winchester Cathedral.
Short story collections can be difficult to discuss in one sitting, but that doesn’t stop me from trying. Luckily, with his new collection, author Ben Nickol linked together some of the stories through characters and circumstances. Ben stopped by the KMUW studios recently to visit with me about the collection, Sun River .
If you've been listening to Marginalia for a while, you've probably heard my next guest before.
Kate Williams is a self-described '90s kid. If you don’t believe her, a look at the pop culture references sprinkled throughout her new YA book, The Babysitters Coven , might convince you.
Throughout her three collections of poetry and one work of fiction, author Jeanine Hathaway often weaves themes of faith into her writing. Her new collection of poems, Long After Lauds , is no exception.
My guest this episode is a voice you've probably heard before, especially if you've been listening to Marginalia for a while. Brock Clarke just released his 8th work of fiction, Who Are You, Calvin Bledsoe?, and he visited with me about it the day before publication.
Author Renee Rosen has penned 5 works of historical fiction. Her latest, Park Avenue Summer , focuses on two women: one fictional and one not. The setting is 1965, New York City. And the historical character that readers might recognize is Helen Gurley Brown. Through this novel, Rosen explores a four-month stretch soon after Brown was named editor-in-chief of a failing Cosmopolitan magazine.
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Podcast Details

Created by
KMUW
Podcast Status
Active
Started
Nov 24th, 2020
Latest Episode
Nov 24th, 2020
Release Period
2 per month
Episodes
121
Avg. Episode Length
20 minutes
Explicit
No
Language
English

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