The British Broadcasting Century with Paul Kerensa

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Our first special stars radio pioneer Captain H.J. Round, in a true piece of history.   We're on a break between seasons, so here's the first of a few specials... about one of the last of a few, a genius cigar-chomping engineer who shaped the modern world.   We've mentioned Captain H.J. Round on season 1 of the podcast, but we've not heard from him till now - in fact few people have ever heard him. This recording, as far as we know, hasn't been publicly released in its entirety before.   Henry Joseph Round worked with Marconi since the turn of the 20th century. His radio direction-finding innovation helped decide the fate of the First World War in The Battle of Jutland, earning him the Military Cross in 1918.   Round co-created broadcasting in 1920, when his test transmissions 'went viral', with amateur radio owners tuning in (oh, he helped invent 'tuning in' too) and listening in.   He designed the first BBC transmitter and early BBC microphones. Away from broadcasting, he developed radar and sonar, and stumbled on electroluminescence 50 years before it was rediscovered in the modern LED.   In this episode, you'll hear his acceptance speech after being awarded the Armstrong Medal by the Radio Club of America on December 12th 1952. Many thanks to Captain Round's grandson David Jervis for sharing this recording with us.   If you understand even most of it, I'll be very impressed! It's technical, and it's thorough. There are tales too of Dame Nellie Melba's famous broadcast, of Marconi, of applying for a job with Edison (but Edison wasn't paying enough), and so much more. My advice: lose yourself in a nostalgic, sometimes unfathomable world of thermionic valves and often incomprehensible jargon. Treat it like a hedge maze: enjoy being lost, knowing someone has carefully built this.   You'll hear: - Harry Hobb’s citation and awarding of the medal - Round on working for Marconi’s in America, inc transmitters in Babylon, NY and Riverhead, NY  - Round in search of food at Cape Race, Newfoundland - Marconi’s in England, inc. the Melba broadcast - The Marconi Company later years - Other places referenced include Glace Bay in Nova Scotia, Clifden in Ireland, and Chelmsford in Essex.   Then you'll hear E Howard Armstrong's tribute. On the night that came first, but for this podcast I've moved it to the end of the podcast. Armstrong covers WWI's Battle of Jutland and Round’s radio direction-finding innovation.   There is plenty more reading matter here: http://www.r-type.org/timeline/time-012.htm http://www.r-type.org/timeline/time-119.htm https://collection.sciencemuseumgroup.org.uk/people/ap30311/round-henry-joseph   We're unaffiliated with the BBC - in fact we're just one person - it's me, Paul, hello.   So to help us spread word of this small project, please do rate/review/rant about it on social media - it's always hugely appreciated and really helps us reach more ears.   If you LOVE the podcast and find some £ in your pocket, paypal.me/paulkerensa helps keep us in books and web-hosting (and the more books we get, the more accurate we'll be!) or patreon.com/paulkerensa also adds extra writing extracts, articles and advance videos from me (not just broadcasting-based, across my other writings too...). Lately that includes a full interview with Diddy David Hamilton - to be included in extracts on season 2 of the podcast.   We're on Twitter and have a new Facebook group as well as our Facebook page.   My mailing list has more on my upcomings, books, TV shows etc.   The recording in this episode has been sent our way by David Jervis - thank you David!   Subscribe where you found this podcast to automatically get the next episode - another special.
Ending season 1, here's episode 21 to tie up some loose ends, correct some clarifications and clarify some corrections from our previous 20 episodes on the prehistory of the BBC, radio and life as we know it. There's also an exclusive wide-ranging interview with TV presenter (Get Fresh, How 2), podcaster (Gareth Jones on Speed) and science enthusiast Gareth Jones, known for a brief spell on children's TV as Gaz Top. Find more on his podcast via his website, or his clips 'n' films on Youtube.  Next episode we'll begin a run of 'specials' before we embark on season 2. But first on this episode: Back on episode 1, we covered the first radio entertainment programme... but we DIDN'T cover the first radio entertainment in Britain. So we'll meet Lieutenant Crauford on the good shop Andromeda, in 1907. Then in 1917, there's Captain and Mrs Donisthorpe cycling to and fro in a field in Worcester, to check if each other heard them transmit. On episode 16, we talked about the first broadcast comedian Helena Millais... but we DIDN'T cover some of the other turns vying for the crown: Will Hay, M'Lita Dolores, Wilfrid Liddiatt, Peggy Rae (mother of Peter Sellers), Charles Cory, William Parkyn, Herbert Dickeson, Ernie Mayne... We delve into Will Hay's 1922 stage revue Listening In - you can see a silent clip of it here. Ernie Mayne's Wireless on the Brain can be heard on Youtube, and you can hear more of Ernie and other music hall performers on Earl Okin's podcast, ep138 or older episodes here. We also zoom in on who the BBC's first four employees actually were - and how it depends how you define 'employees'. (We reckon the first 9ish were Burrows, Lewis, Jefferies, Anderson, Reith, Edgar, Palmer, Shields, Eckersley...)   Your thoughts are welcome on this and everything broadcasting-history-based - email me with anything, including your AMs (recorded Airwave Memories - a minute or so of you speaking into a Voice Memo with your earliest memories of radio/TV) or FMs (written memories of when you saw broadcasting in action).     We also recommend Mark Heywood's Behind the Spine podcast, especially their recent episode with archivists from Paramount and Zoetrope.   And we mention Cecil A Lewis' 1924 book Broadcasting From Within. It's the earliest book on broadcasting - I'm reading it at the moment... and you can too! Thanks to the fab BBCEng website, it's here for all to read.   We're unaffiliated with the BBC - in fact we're just one person - it's me, Paul, hello.   So to help us spread word of this small project, please do rate/review/rant about it on social media - it's always hugely appreciated and really helps us reach more ears.   If you LOVE the podcast and find some £ in your pocket, paypal.me/paulkerensa helps keep us in books and web-hosting (and the more books we get, the more accurate we'll be!) or patreon.com/paulkerensa also adds extra writing extracts, articles and advance videos from me (not just broadcasting-based, across my other writings too...). I thank you!   Find us on Twitter - and especially our new Facebook group, which is a nice community of sharings and findings, as well as our Facebook page, which is more me telling you when the next episode is here. Subscribe of course, and you'll get the next episode automatically. My mailing list has more on my upcomings, books, TV shows etc. Our clips are either public domain or the BBC's, to whom we doff our caps, and thank them... or we've been unable to track down the rights-holders, but the clips are OOOOOLD, so we believe them to be a-ok. If you disagree and own a clip we've got, we'll gladly remove anything. We're just here to tell a good (hi)story: to inform, educate and entertain.
Merry listening! Now, do you hear what I hear? Join our sleigh ride back to Christmas 1922, and delve deep into our pod-sack to discover what the BBC was broadcasting in its first Christmas. Includes: the first religious broadcast from Rev John Mayo, the first play written for radio in The Truth About Father Christmas, the BBC's first celebrity guest, the first radio talk ('Christmas among the Blind'), carols, Peter Pan, comedy from Fred Gibson and Helena Millais... and that's just from the London 2LO station. Birmingham 5IT gives us Dickens, the Birmingham City Police Band and no-shows, so listeners rush to the studio to help out. Manchester 2ZY brings ghost stories and Handel's Messiah. And Newcastle 5NO launches; hear the first station boss on how he funded it from his own pocket. Plus other radio Christmases: Carols from King's, the first royal Christmas broadcast, a Cornish play called Bethlehem, a wax cylinder recording from 1898... Our guest is Xmas Xpert James Cooper from whychristmas.com - head there for all your online Christmas needs. Paul reads from his festive history book Hark! The Biography of Christmas. Signed copies available from Paul; unsigned copies available from your friendly local bookshop. ----- Thanks for supporting the podcast. Your kind donations at ko-fi.com/paulkerensa or patreon.com/paulkerensa have helped fund books, that fuel these episodes, or hosting, that keeps us online. Your ratings/reviewings/sharings are equally welcome. Thanks! Find us on Facebook and Twitter. Paul's mailing list has more on his upcomings, inc. the next series of Not Going Out. Be on the podcast next year: email us a 2min audio clip of an Airwave Memory, recorded as a Voice Memo - your earliest memories of radio or TV. Clips are either public domain or the BBC's, to whom we doff our caps, and thank them. We're unaffiliated with the BBC - we're just here to inform, educate, entertain and wish you a Merry Christmas. www.paulkerensa.com
...and the Midlands, as Birmingham and Manchester join the party. We revisit the second day of the BBC: November 15th 1922. Also, how Manchester launched the first BBC children's programmes, how Birmingham had the BBC's first live music, and how London needed to tweak their microphone. All on election day, so just before the first Election Night Special. You'll also hear of the bizarre Birmingham fog that delayed launch - and bizarrer still, how ANOTHER Birmingham fog delayed The Settlers from reaching a studio, 40 years later. From that band, Cindy Kent is our guest, recalling being at the BBC as the Light Programme became Radio 1 in 1967.  You'll also hear playwright David Edgar reading from the memoirs of his grandfather Percy Edgar, the founding manager of Birmingham 5IT. (For the full reading of that, just wait 3 episodes...) From the archives, we've also got the voices of Richard Wright and Hugh Bell of 2ZY Manchester, both there on that launch day in 1922. Plus Newspaper Detective Andrew Barker returns with what the printed press thought about this two-day-old upstart... broadcasting. ----- Thanks for supporting the podcast. Your kind donations at ko-fi.com/paulkerensa or patreon.com/paulkerensa have helped fund books, that fuel these episodes, or hosting, that keeps us online. Your ratings/reviewings/sharings are equally welcome. Thanks! Find us on Facebook and Twitter. Paul's mailing list has more on his upcomings, inc. the next series of Not Going Out. Paul's festive history book Hark! The Biography of Christmas is in audiobook (Listen free via an Audible free trial here if you've not had one before). If you'd like to order a signed paperback copy, email Paul. You can also use that to send us a 2min audio clip of an Airwave Memory to include on the show. Clips are either public domain or the BBC's, to whom we doff our caps, and thank them. We're unaffiliated with the BBC - we're just here to inform, educate and entertain about its wondrous origins. Happy listening!
"You know, this broadcasting is going to be jolly good fun." ...That adlib ended the very first BBC broadcast, given by Arthur Burrows on November 14th, 1922 - and re-enacted on this special birthday episode.  Yes we've made it! After 17 episodes building up to the big launch, the BBC is on air. This episode lands on the Beeb's 98th birthday - and to celebrate, we've done something that we THINK is a first: a complete reconstruction of the very first BBC broadcast. Well, not a complete reconstruction... because Arthur Burrows read the news bulletin twice, once at a normal speed, and once slow. We've spared you the slow version - because the normal speed was slow enough. Just listen back to it again straight away after, on 0.5x speed setting. We include the precise news items in the right order - weather first, shutdown after 7 minutes - so it's as accurate as can be, thanks to Andrew Barker (who excellently researched and wrote the bulletin), Will Farmer (who gave us the tuning organ and tubular bells, plus the original podcast music) and Tim Wander (who checked for errors and has written many marvellous books about all this). After that re-enactment, we dissect, fill in the gaps, and generally inform, educate and entertain about day 1 of Auntie Beeb. Plus more from the mighty Emperor Rosko. That full 10min re-enactment is also on Youtube here, or an edited, more palatable 2min version is here. Feel free to share, broadcast and do as you wish with them - get the story out there by all means. Speaking of which, Tim Wander's plays, on some earlier parts of broadcasting history, can be watched online here: - The Power Behind the Microphone: A centenary celebration of Dame Nellie Melba's historic broadcast from Chelmsford - Voices over Passchendaele: Peter Eckersley's war years - The Man Behind the Microphone: Peter Eckersley's Writtle/BBC years This podcast continues thanks to your support - it's bought us books that have spawned entire episodes. So thank you if you've visited ko-fi.com/paulkerensa and tipped £3 or more, or patreon.com/paulkerensa and helped us with £5 or more a month (with perks in return). If you've not, you know where they are. We're on Facebook and Twitter with accompanying pics and other details. If you'd rate and review this podcast wherever you found it, that helps others find it too. Thanks! Do subscribe to get future episodes direct to your device. Join Paul's mailing list for more info on his goings-on.  Clips are public domain as far as we know. They're old. We're happy to be corrected on that. We're nothing to do with the BBC - we're just here to talk about their origins and wish them happy birthday. Here's to the next 98!  
We're nearly there! Episode 17 zooms in on the pre-BBC fortnight. You'd have thought everything's in place by now, right? Not quite - just the tiny non-controversial matters of the licence fee and allegations of bias to deal with first. Good job they're all sorted now... We've got archive reminiscences from pioneer Peter Eckersley and the return of Newspaper Detective Andrew Barker, who also gives us an Airwave Memory (email a clip of yours for next season: paul@paulkerensa.com) We mention CenturiesofSound.com - try their 1922 mix for starters. We also mention Tim Wander's search for Melba's voice - read the Times article here. We're on Facebook and Twitter, with lots more supporting pics and links there. Support the show at patreon.com/paulkerensa has regular perks, advance things - not all to do with the podcast, but some. There's also advance writing and videos from Paul. ...or support the show by sharing/rating/reviewing the show. Thanks! Join Paul's mailing list for updates on his writing, gigs, podcasts, videos etc. Paul's festive history book Hark! The Biography of Christmas is now in audiobook form. Get it for free via an Audible free trial here if you've not had one before. Thanks to Will Farmer for composing the original music. Archive clips are either public domain or private domain from long enough ago... but if you own a clip, say and we'll remove it. We're just here to inform, educate and entertain. This podcast is in no way affiliated with the BBC. You knew that. We say it every time. Next time, the launch of the BBC! Including a re-enactment of the very first broadcast. It'll land on November 14th, the 98th anniversary of the BBC, so listen on the day of release. The day of the podcast's release, that is, not the day of your release. Although this episode's recorded during a lockdown, so... anyway, happy listening. www.paulkerensa.com
The first drama, the first comedian... Journey with us to October 1922 for the rarely told tale radio's first play (Cyrano de Bergerac, courtesy of Peter Eckersley) and British broadcasting's first comedian. Helena Millais played Cockney character Our Lizzie - and you'll even hear a bit of her act. We'll look at the few before her too - entertainers and storytellers - and those who came after. Cultural historian and comedy writer Alan Stafford is your guide, and his fab books It's Friday, It's Crackerjack and Wilson, Keppel and Betty: Too Naked for the Nazis are available now. Also available is Lorne Clark's book Shareholders of the British Broadcasting Company, plus explore his amazing Early Wireless museum - and he's sent us a marvellous clip of his wax cylinder: recorded in 1890, trumpeter Martin Lanfried plays the bugle he sounded at The Charge of the Light Brigade in 1854. Wow. That makes the 1920s sound modern. You'll also hear our regular broadcasting historian Tim Wander, and his fab books include the brilliant From Marconi to Melba. Find us on Facebook and Twitter, and please support the show if you can via ko-fi.com/paulkerensa for one-off £, or patreon.com/paulkerensa for regular perks - including advance writing and things from Paul. Your host Paul Kerensa's mailing list has monthly updates of his writing, gigs, podcasts, etc. Sign up! Paul's festive history book Hark! The Biography of Christmas is now in audiobook form. There's an Audible free trial here if you've not had one before - so you can get Hark! for free, then cancel, and pay nowt. Paul's Facebook Live show is at PK's Uplift Live, every Tuesday from 8pm.  Thanks to Will Farmer for composing the original music. Archive clips are either public domain or we don't know whose domain. If you think a clip is yours, apologies/thanks - everything's takedownable. We're unaffiliated with the BBC... ...but Paul is writing a TV drama script (and novel) based on all this, so if you're a drama producer or commissioner... Well don't you look lovely today? Email me. Let's make the BBC history. So to speak.
For ep 15, our story of broadcasting reaches one John Reith, who spots a job advertisement in the Morning Post. He's never heard of broadcasting. But what led him to that point? Revisiting landmark moments of our story so far, we'll trace Reith's unusual, unorthodox, unexpected life. From son of the manse to voice of the nation, via love, friendship, war... and all three of those are somehow mixed up together in Reith's beloved: Charlie. It's quite a story, and we're indebted to Ian McIntyre's The Expense of Glory, Garry Allighan's Sir John Reith, Marista Leishman's My Father: Reith of the BBC and Charles Stuart's edited The Reith Diaries. Most quotations are from the latter. I recommend all four books for a deep-dive into this. Plus an Airwave Memory from Cole Moreton, whose marvellous book is The Light Keeper - also recommended. For pictures, discussion and other bits and pieces, join us on Facebook and Twitter and 'like' or 'follow' or whatever they call it now there. You can support the show via ko-fi.com/paulkerensa for one-off £, or patreon.com/paulkerensa for regular perks - including advance writing and things from Paul. Paul's mailing list is very much joinable, for a monthly update of this, that and the other (writing, gigs, podcasts, etc). As mentioned on the podcast, Paul's festive history book Hark! The Biography of Christmas is now in audiobook form. There's an Audible free trial here if you've not had one before - so you can get Hark! for free, then cancel, and pay nowt. (Full disclosure - I get a couple of quids if you click and activate that, even if you only ever do the free trial.) (Oh and another full disclosure - I'm happy to take a few quid from Amazon, but I'd rather not line Jeff Bezos' pockets much further, so if you're going to buy Hark! The Biography of Christmas, this link takes you to Hive, which supports local independent bookshops - or just ask yours direct. I'm sure they'd love to hear from you.) Paul's Facebook Live show is PK's Uplift Live, every Tuesday from 8pm. Do join. Occasionally he talks about broadcasting history there too. There's also a quiz, some comedy, and an attempt at normality. Thanks to Will Farmer for composing the original music. Archive clips are either public domain or private domain from so long ago, it's nigh-on-impossible to trace... but if you own a clip and want it removed, we'd be happy to oblige. We're just here to inform, educate and entertain - thanks for helping us do so. (This podcast is not affiliated with the BBC. Unless they'd like it to be. But as it stands, this entire operation is just one bloke shouting into his wardrobe. Thanks for listening. Otherwise it's just the shirts.)
We're back, and we're a little muffled. (I'll be hitting my microphone with hammers, promise.) As I struggle with 2020 tech, the Great British public were struggling with theirs, getting to know their first radio sets in Sept/Oct 1922, at the First All-British Wireless Exhibition and Convention (FABWEAC, for short). So this time, hear the sights, smell the sounds and meet the artistes, such as singer and future radio boss Rex Faithful, first pianist of the BBC Maurice Cole and first broadcast royal, the Prince of Wales (before he regenerated into Edward VIII). Oh and the BBC is formed. No biggie. But did you know that Hotpoint and Siemens had their bosses on the first board of BBC directors? No, me neither. Radio's just another household appliance to some people... but come on, how many podcasts devoted to dishwashers? [checks] Wow, loads. Plus an Airwave Memory from Philip Rowe of the History of European Theatre Podcast - give 'em a listen! There are pics to go with this episode on our Facebook and Twitter pages, including a fuller line-up of FABWEAC's artistes. There's also a nice silent video of 1922's King's Cup Air Race, that we mention in this episode, here. Support the show at ko-fi.com/paulkerensa or patreon.com/paulkerensa for perks and things - thanks! More details on Paul's next Writing Course here or on Paul's mailing list. Paul's Tuesday evening Facebook Live show is called PK's Uplift Live. Do join. Occasionally he talks about broadcasting history there too. Thanks to Will Farmer for the original music. Older music is either public domain or private domain but we're not sure whose. If you have any copyright issues with the attached audio, do let us know and we'll remove if you'd rather. We're just here to inform, educate and entertain - thanks for helping us do so. (Oh and we're nothing to do with the BBC. Never heard of them.)
In episode 13, we're in August/Sept 1922, which means: - Manchester's first broadcast concert - The pre-BBC battles the printed press. Has the BBC got news for us? Erm... Not yet, and not easily. - The Reithian values arrive - 'to inform, educate & entertain' - except somehow they're knocking about before John Reith's even heard of broadcasting. Our guest is Andrew Barker, a former BBC producer and radio history enthusiast, who's been delving into the newspaper archives to bring us fascinating clippings from 1922. Hear how the Manchester Guardian told its readers what a radio tuner was... how Caruso, Gilbert & Sullivan and a racist song all came to the wireless that summer... and how impatient the listeners were getting for the Postmaster General to pull his finger out and press 'go' on the BBC. Plus an excerpt from a 1937 Radio Pictorial magazine courtesy of Stewart Henderson. See many such excerpts in photo form, shared to our @bbcentury pages on Facebook and Twitter. Support the show at patreon.com/paulkerensa and get advance bits of Paul's writing - thanks! Paul's running a Writing Course (on Zoom) this Sept-Nov. Do join, if you want to write anything and want to include things like 'a story' or 'character'. More details here. Hear Paul on BBC Radios Sussex & Surrey here, and on BBC Radio 2's Pause For Thought here (find his face, like Guess Who). Hurrah for Will Farmer's original music. Buy Paul's Books; join his Mailing list. This podcast is unaffiliated to the BBC. We're talking about them, not with them. 
Part 2 of the pre-BBC's summer of music covers June and July 1922. As The Spice Girls once nearly sang, tonight (this episode) is the night (the episode) when 2 (BBCs) become 1 (BBC). Hear the voices of those who weren't just there - they were pushing the buttons. This episode includes: - How we got the licence fee! - Garden party demonstrations - Elstree - the arrival of Cecil Lewis Plus an Airwave Memory from Pete Hawkins (twitter.com/fictoids1) and Firsthand Memories from covering I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue and the World Service. ====== This podcast is unaffiliated to the mighty BBC. We just like talking about them. Support the show at patreon.com/paulkerensa or ko-fi.com/paulkerensa - thanks! Thanks Will Farmer for the original music. We're on Facebook and Twitter - do join us there. Paul on BBC Radios Sussex & Surrey can be heard here. Paul's appearances on BBC Radio 2's Pause For Thought can be heard here (with others). Paul's Mailing list Paul's Books  Closedown (Please stand for the National Anthem)
Two British Broadcasting Companies! That's the result of the negotiations of summer 1922. Part one of this two-parter brings us two parallel storylines: boardroom debates (a la The Apprentice) and studio sing-songs (a la Top of the Pops). In this exciting episode, hear the voices and reminiscences of John Reith, Peter Eckersley, Arthur Burrows, Lord Gainford - those who were there as the BBC finally got its name. ====== This podcast is unaffiliated to the mighty BBC. We just like talking about them, and how they came into being. ...So your licence fee is not supporting this project! If you'd like to help keep us on air: ko-fi.com/paulkerensa chips in £3 or patreon.com/paulkerensa at £5+/mth gets you exclusive benefits and things. Thanks those who've joined! Thanks Will Farmer for the original music. Thanks for sharing us and liking us on Facebook and Twitter, and for rating & reviewing us. It's been all 5 stars so far and we love you for it - it helps get more ears on the podcast. Get your voice on the podcast by emailing a clip of your AM - Airwave Memories - 1-2min of you telling us your favourite early broadcasting memories. Or email us some words some FM - First-hand Memories - of times you saw radio or TV in action. What surprised you about it? Do tell. On this ep we mentioned Eddie Bohan's book: 'Rebel Radio: Ireland's First International Radio Station 1916'. More info on the book here. Your host Paul is on Facebook Live every Tuesday 8pm for PK's Uplift Live: a show of fun and games, unrelated to this podcast, but often with a broadcast history reading, because he can't resist. Paul on BBC Radios Sussex & Surrey can be heard here. Paul's appearances on BBC Radio 2's Pause For Thought can be heard here (find Paul's face. He has glasses. It's a bit like playing Guess Who...) Paul's Mailing list Paul's Books  Pip pip
In episode 10, we journey through the round window... 2ZY Manchester arrives in mid-May 1922, then children's broadcasting in mid-November: Kiddies Corner, as part of a night of General Election results. Weird.   Hear the voices that started children's broadcasting: Richard Wright (aka Uncle Humpty Dumpty) and Reginald Jordan (a 10-year-old radio announcer).    Back in the present day, CHRIS JARVIS (CBeebies, CBBC, Children's BBC, 'The Anorak', Show Me Show Me, Stargazing... etc etc etc) joins us for an exclusive chat about the role of children's TV and radio, right up to his brand new project, Magic Den for CBeebies Radio.   Expect a short break before ep11 (it's summer hols), as we stampede towards the birth of the Beeb in a few episodes' time.   We aren't affiliated to said Beeb in any way at all. We just like talking about them, and where they've come from, and maybe where they're going.   ...So your licence fee is not supporting this project! If you'd like to help keep us on air: ko-fi.com/paulkerensa chips in £3 or patreon.com/paulkerensa at £5+/mth gets you exclusive benefits and things. Thanks those who've joined!   Thanks Will Farmer for the original music.   Thanks for sharing us and liking us on Facebook and Twitter, and for rating & reviewing us. It's been all 5 stars so far and we love you for it - it helps get more ears on the podcast.   Get your voice on the podcast by emailing a clip of your AM - Airwave Memories - 1-2min of you telling us your favourite early broadcasting memories. Or email us some words some FM - First-hand Memories - of times you saw radio or TV in action. What surprised you about it? Do tell.   Your host Paul is on Facebook Live every Tuesday 8pm for PK's Uplift Live: a show of fun and games, unrelated to this podcast, but often with a broadcast history reading, because he can't resist.   Paul's Mailing list   Paul's Books    Paul's Goodbye: Goodbye.
Episode 9 brings us to the famous '2LO': London is calling the world, on our journey towards the BBC's birth. Hear the voices that launched broadcasting in the UK, plus rivalry and pranks, including Arthur Burrows and Peter Eckersley recreating a 1922 moment via clips from 1938 and 1960. (It looks weird written down, but trust me.) This episode's 'AM' (Airwave Memories) comes from radio producer Chris Byland. Send yours by recording a 1-2min audio clip of you reminiscing about your earliest memories of radio/TV. Your 'FM' (First-hand Memories) are welcome too - a new feature of emailed-in observations of when YOU saw radio in action. Email me here. A reminder: we're unaffiliated with the BBC. We're just fascinated by how they got under way - and maybe it'll tell us more about today's world of broadcaster v government v press... - We air a few seconds of rare audio of radio pioneer Captain HJ Round... Hear the full 15mins here on Youtube.  Support the podcast! I've got books and gramophone records in my sights that'll improve the podcast no end. Help us afford them?...  - ko-fi.com/paulkerensa chips in £3 - patreon.com/paulkerensa starts at £5/mth and you get benefits - 5 of you have joined us in the last fortnight. THANK YOU! Please do share, rate, review, the podcast. It helps a heap. We're on Facebook and Twitter with relevant pics & chat.  Original music is by Will Farmer. Hire him now! Your host Paul also presents PK's Uplift Live: a Facebook Live each Tue 8pm, of fun and games. ...and he's available for socially-distanced outdoor stand-up gigs. Very bookable. Paul's Mailing list | Books | Facebook | Twitter | Youtube | Website 
Feb 14th, 1922: Britain finally gets a regular broadcast service. Only it's a little dry. Till Peter Eckersley gives his engineers gin and tonics (also dry), runs to the mic, and brings entertainment radio to the masses with jokes, songs, impressions and severe over-running. Hear all about it - including archive clips aplenty - including more from broadcasting historian Tim Wander (buy his books here). Plus an early broadcasting memory - now called 'AM' (Airwave Memories) from Jamie Dyer of the Watching the Wireless podcast. We're nowt to do with the BBC - we just like to talk about them. (Though if you work for the BBC and can commission us to make this entire series again for you, get in touch... and can we have access to your archive please?) - This podcast needs you!...  - ko-fi.com/paulkerensa chips in £3 - patreon.com/paulkerensa starts at £5/mth and you get benefits - join our merry small band who help keep us on air. And/or just share, rate, review, tweet + talk about this podcast. It really helps. We're also on Facebook and Twitter - 'like' us there.  Original music is by Will Farmer. Clarinet is by Adam Smith. Join your host Paul every Tuesday 8pm for PK's Uplift Live: a Facebook Live of fun and games, mostly unrelated to this podcast, but normally with a broadcast history reading most weeks. Paul's Mailing list | Books | Facebook | Twitter | Youtube | Website 
Thank Eckersley for the BBC! It's almost entirely down to him. Never heard of him? Then listen on, to the original PPE... We chat to broadcasting historian Tim Wander (who knows more about Eckersley than anyone on the planet). Plus hear clips from Captain Eckersley himself, both in wild action on air, and looking back over his amazing career as first BBC Chief Engineer, first regular voice on British radio, and pioneer of air traffic control. Oh yes, he also built an airport. And he was a spy in WW2. What a tale! It's all here on this unaffiliated-to-the-BBC-we-have-to-make-that-clear podcast. Support the podcast:  - ko-fi.com/paulkerensa buys me a coffee - patreon.com/paulkerensa has tiers and benefits - thanks to Mel, Chris and Andrew who've joined up this month! - and thank you for sharing, rating, reviewing, tweeting + talking about this podcast. It really helps. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for extra bits and pieces.  Original music is by Will Farmer - wrangler of notes. Your host Paul's Mailing list | Books | Facebook | Twitter | Youtube | Website 
A minisode that somehow ends up longer than a normal episode... Instead of telling you all about 1922's pioneer extraordinaire P.P. Eckersley, we're putting him back a week. Well, the radio hams of the day had to wait 18 months - you can wait 7 days. Before him, we bring a tale of William Le Queux, amateur broadcaster of 1921 - oh and he was a writer from Guildford. Like your host... Plus a tale of hospital radio, and a TV memory from illustrator Rachel Berman. Support the podcast:  - ko-fi.com/paulkerensa buys me a coffee - patreon.com/paulkerensa has tiers and benefits - and your sharing, rating, reviewing and talking about this podcast is hugely appreciated. Follow our Facebook page and Twitter handle for pictures and things to go with this podcast.  Original music is by Will Farmer - if you need music, visit his page. Paul's Mailing list | Books | Facebook | Twitter | Youtube | Website 
Meet the guv'nor: BBC's first newsreader, children's presenter, actor, Head of Programmes... but before all that Arthur Burrows was one of broadcasting's lone prophets, convincing journalists, ministers and future listeners-in that mass entertainment from a small box was A Good Thing. Plus we exclusively hear from a pirate radio legend. Emperor Rosko tells us his journey from naval ship DJ to Radio Caroline, Radio Luxembourg and the first line-up of BBC Radio 1. This podcast has nothing by the way to do with the BBC. We're talking about them, not with them... It's just a one-man band here. If you'd like to support that one-man band:  - ko-fi.com/paulkerensa buys me a coffee - patreon.com/paulkerensa has tiers and benefits - and your sharing, rating, reviewing and talking about this podcast is hugely appreciated. Follow our Facebook page and Twitter handle for pictures and things to go with this podcast.  Original music is by Will Farmer - if you need music, visit his page. Paul's Mailing list | Books | Facebook | Twitter | Youtube | Website 
Hip hip hurrah! Our centenary special, landing on the 100th birthday of professional public broadcast radio in Britain. Hear the best/only (possibly) re-enactment of the Melba Concert, sent from Chelmsford to the world on June 15th 1920 - exactly a century before this episode lands. Relive the songs, the fire, a genuine joke, the panic when it goes off-air... and discover how an attempt at Daily Mail Radio sparked British broadcasting into being. This podcast is here to inform, educate + entertain on the origins of the BBC, radio and life as we know it - but has no affiliation with either the British Broadcasting Corporation or the British Broadcasting Company (which, in fairness, ceased trading in 1926, so that was always unlikely). Pleas rate and review wherever you got this podcast - it really helps spread word. It's a one-man operation! Join Paul TONIGHT on Facebook Live, with a live talk/Q&A on The History of the BBC (basically this entire podcast series condensed into an hour). £Pay What You Want, details here or on our Facebook page. Your questions/comments (written) or early broadcasting memories (recorded) are welcome via email.  This episode's guest was Lorna Farrell, and her Facebook page of prayers and poems is here. Support the show at Patreon / Ko-fi ...Please? Then we can pay people, like composer of our original music, Will Farmer   Visit BBCentury on Facebook / Twitter Paul's Mailing list | Books | Facebook | Twitter | Youtube | Website  HAPPY BIRTHDAY, BROADCASTING! Here's to the next 100...
The 1st woman on British radio! Radio's 1st professional artiste! The 1st listings! The 1st programme with a title! Journey back to early 1920 for episode 3 of the story of pre-BBC broadcasting, and meet W.T. Ditcham, Captain H.J. Round and Winifred Sayer - the girl from the ball-bearings factory who brought song to our radio sets.  Monday 15th June 2020 (soon! In fact, probably in the past...) Paul's doing a Facebook Live talk on The History of the BBC (basically this entire podcast series condensed into an hour), with Q&A. It's £Pay What You Want, details here or on our Facebook page. We're here to inform, educate + entertain on the origins of the BBC, radio and life as we know it. I say 'we'. It's just me.  Oh, and original music by Will Farmer   Oh, and our guest is Emily Jeffery, who presents the fab Edge of England podcast. (To be our guest, email an audio clip of your early broadcasting memories.) Support the show at Patreon / Ko-fi Visit BBCentury on Facebook / Twitter Please Share/Rate/Review wherever you got this podcast. It really helps. Paul's Mailing list | Books | Facebook | Twitter | Youtube | Website  BTW, we have no affiliation to the BBC, or to the BTW, whatever that is.
Episode 2 of our journey towards British broadcasting's birth: Dr Crippen, Titanic, war, a ghost + 2 brilliant engineers.  Be informed, educated + entertained on the origins of the BBC, radio and life as we know it. (We've no affiliation with the BBC, to be clear.) Original music by Will Farmer   - Email an audio clip of your early broadcasting memories, or send your questions/comments Support the show at Patreon / Ko-fi  Visit BBCentury on Facebook / Twitter Please Share/Rate/Review wherever you got this podcast. It really helps. Paul's Mailing list | Books | Facebook | Twitter | Youtube | Website  Pip pip!  
Episode 1: Morse, Marconi + Reg Fessenden's first entertainment show.  This episode covers 1830-1906, yes, we're not even in the last 100 years yet... but first we have to invent wireless telephony. Be informed, educated + entertained on the origins of the BBC, radio and life as we know it. (We've no affiliation with the BBC, to be clear.) - Email an audio clip of your early broadcasting memories, or your questions/comments  Visit BBCentury on Facebook / Twitter Support the show at Patreon / Ko-fi  Guest Philip Simon's Youtube  Original music by Will Farmer   Paul's Mailing list | Books | Facebook | Twitter | Youtube | Website  Closing down now...
Happy 100th Birthday Radio! Welcome to the podcast that informs, educates + entertains on the origins of the BBC, radio and life as we know it.  (Oh, we've no affiliation with the BBC, to be clear.)  Original music by Will Farmer. All other clips are public domain, by our understanding, due to their vast age. If we're wrong and you own a clip, get in touch.  Be on the podcast: Email an audio clip of your early broadcasting memories, or send your questions/comments  Support the show at Patreon / Ko-fi  Visit BBCentury on Facebook / Twitter  Please Share/Rate/Review wherever you got this podcast. It really helps. Paul's Mailing list | Books | Facebook | Twitter | Youtube | Website  Pip pip!
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Podcast Details

Created by
Paul Kerensa
Podcast Status
Active
Started
Jun 2nd, 2020
Latest Episode
Feb 17th, 2021
Release Period
Weekly
Episodes
22
Avg. Episode Length
27 minutes
Explicit
No
Order
Serial
Language
English

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