Cobus van Staden is a co-host of China in Africa Podcast, and senior China-Africa researcher at the South African Institute of International Affairs.
Just by looking at social media and news coverage in countries like Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa, it would be safe to assume that China-Africa ties are in serious trouble. The prevailing narrative in many countries is one where Africa is increasingly victimized by China through debt, labor abuse and outright discrimination among other problems.But that's only part of the story. A different narrative showcases how China's political ties with African governments have never been stronger. The Chinese are providing desperately needed relief to struggling African states through debt relief, COVID-19 supplies and the promise of being among the first to access a C19 vaccine when it's available.The fact is that significant portions of both these are true, making it very difficult to understand the current state of China-Africa relations.Hangwei Li, an award-winning journalist and PhD candidate at the University of London, and Johannesburg-based attorney and China-Africa analyst Jacqueline Muna Musiitwa tackled this challenge in a new article published by the Royal United Services Institute for Defence and Security Studies. Hangwei an Jacqueline join Eric and Cobus to discuss the competing agendas that complicate public perceptions of the Chinese in Africa.JOIN THE DISCUSSION:Facebook: www.facebook.com/ChinaAfricaProject Twitter: @eolander | @stadenesque | @hangwei_li | @nubiancounselSUBSCRIBE TO THE CAP'S DAILY EMAIL NEWSLETTER FOR JUST $3 FOR 3 MONTHS.Your subscription supports independent journalism. Subscribers get the following:1. A daily email newsletter of the top China-Africa news.2. Access to the China-Africa Experts Network3. Unlimited access to the CAP's exclusive analysis content on chinaafricaproject.comTry it out for just $3 for 3 months: www.chinaafricaproject.com/subscribe  
It's been almost five months since a spate of anti-African discrimination erupted in Guangzhou, home to the largest overseas African population in Asia. Back in April, amid mounting fears of a COVID-19 outbreak in the southern Chinese, dozens, possibly hundreds of African residents were evicted from their homes and hotels and forced onto the streets with nowhere to go.Videos, photos and other accounts of the events filled social media feeds in Africa and sparked widespread outrage that still lingers today.In July, a group of five Chinese high school students, most from the eastern city of Suzhou near Shanghai, traveled to Guangzhou to find out what, if anything, has changed since April in terms of relations between African residents and the local population. They recorded their experience for a short-form documentary "Africans in Guangzhou: Misunderstanding, Discrimination and Communication" that they published in August on YouTube and the Chinese video sharing platform Bilibili. Two of the film's producers, Chen Xingbei and Xiao Kaiyuan who are both rising seniors at the The Overseas Chinese Academy of Chiway Suzhou, join Eric & Cobus to discuss their new film and to share their impressions of the current state of Chinese-African community relations in Guangzhou.JOIN THE DISCUSSION:Facebook: www.facebook.com/ChinaAfricaProject Twitter: @eolander | @stadenesque SUBSCRIBE TO THE CAP'S DAILY EMAIL NEWSLETTER FOR JUST $3 FOR 3 MONTHS.Your subscription supports independent journalism. Subscribers get the following:1. A daily email newsletter of the top China-Africa news.2. Access to the China-Africa Experts Network3. Unlimited access to the CAP's exclusive analysis content on chinaafricaproject.comTry it out for just $3 for 3 months: www.chinaafricaproject.com/subscribe  
Today, China is the world's largest official creditor, more twice as large as the World and the International Monetary Fund combined. Nowhere is this more evident than in Africa where Beijing has lent an estimated $143 billion between 2000-2017.But how China lends money is still poorly understood. Many observers often oversimplify the issue by characterizing it as "Chinese loans" or "Chinese finance." The reality is that the Chinese development finance model is extremely complicated and includes a lot of competing actors who each pursue their own agendas.Kanyi Lui is a Beijing-based project finance lawyer who's spent almost two decades working in the overseas Chinese development finance sector. He's worked closely with China's powerful policy banks, commercial creditors and in the private capital market as well. Kanyi joins Eric & Cobus to provide some badly-needed background as to who are the key players in this space and how they operate.SHOW NOTES:Chinese financing: how will China restructure zero-interest loans by Kanyi Lui.Chinese finance: banking with Chinese lenders by Kanyi LuiJOIN THE DISCUSSION:Facebook: www.facebook.com/ChinaAfricaProject Twitter: @eolander | @stadenesqueSUBSCRIBE TO THE CAP'S DAILY EMAIL NEWSLETTER FOR JUST $3 FOR 3 MONTHS.Your subscription supports independent journalism. Subscribers get the following:1. A daily email newsletter of the top China-Africa news.2. Access to the China-Africa Experts Network3. Unlimited access to the CAP's exclusive analysis content on chinaafricaproject.comTry it out for just $3 for 3 months: www.chinaafricaproject.com/subscribe  
2020 has been a tough year for China's soft power engagement in Africa. A furious backlash to anti-African discrimination in Guangzhou in April, growing public hostility to Chinese debt and, of course, questions about Chinese accountability for the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic have all presented formidable challenges to Beijing's reputation management on the continent.While, there's no doubt that China's popularity has taken a hit among large swathes of African civil society, that is not the case among the continent's governing elites where state-to-state remain as strong and stable as ever.Paul Nantulya, a research associate at the Africa Strategic Studies Center in Washington, D.C., closely follows Chinese soft power trends in Africa. Paul joins Eric & Cobus to discuss the Chinese soft power strategy in Africa and how, in many ways, it's fundamentally different than those of U.S. and European governments.JOIN THE DISCUSSION:Facebook: www.facebook.com/ChinaAfricaProject Twitter: @eolander | @stadenesque | @pnantulyaSUBSCRIBE TO THE CAP'S DAILY EMAIL NEWSLETTER FOR JUST $3 FOR 3 MONTHS.Your subscription supports independent journalism. Subscribers get the following:1. A daily email newsletter of the top China-Africa news.2. Access to the China-Africa Experts Network3. Unlimited access to the CAP's exclusive analysis content on chinaafricaproject.comTry it out for just $3 for 3 months: www.chinaafricaproject.com/subscribe  
View 491 more appearances
Share Profile
Are you Cobus? Verify and edit this page to your liking.

Share This Creator

Recommendation sent

Join Podchaser to...

  • Rate podcasts and episodes
  • Follow podcasts and creators
  • Create podcast and episode lists
  • & much more

Creator Details

Location
Johannesburg, Gauteng, South Africa
Episode Count
495
Podcast Count
1
Total Airtime
1 week, 4 days
PCID
Podchaser Creator ID logo 453118