Eric Olander is a journalist, co-founder of the China Africa Project (CAP), and co-host of weekly China in Africa Podcast.
The Chinese definition of journalism is significantly different than that in most of Africa and for much of the rest of the world. Most importantly, the news media in China is tightly controlled by the communist party and, as such, is not afforded the kind of editorial independence that newspapers, radio and other news outlets enjoy in other countries. But beyond the obvious political censorship, the Chinese have a different understanding of journalism’s role in society. Rather than serve in an investigative or adversarial role, the media in China is expected to be solutions oriented in its reporting. The concept, known as “constructive journalism,” is not unique to China as it’s also practiced in some European countries as well but it’s more pervasive there than anywhere else in the world.Professor Zhang Yanqiu, director of the Africa Communication Research Center at the Communication University of China, is one of China’s foremost scholars in “constructive journalism” and joins Eric & Cobus to discuss whether or not she feels the model is applicable in Africa.
Tom Bayes, a researcher at the Konrad-Adenauer Foundation in Berlin joins Eric & Cobus to discuss his new paper that explores the implications for Europe of China's expanding military role in West Africa. SHOW NOTES:The Mercator Institute for China Studies: China’s growing peace and security role in Africa: Views from West Africa, implications for Europe by Tom BayesCCTV6: Trailer for the new documentary "Blue Defensive Line” (蓝线防线) about China's UN peacekeeping operations in South SudanJOIN THE DISCUSSION:Facebook: www.facebook.com/ChinaAfricaProject Twitter: @eolander | @stadenesque SUPPORT THIS PODCAST. BECOME A SUBSCRIBER TO THE CHINA AFRICA PROJECT.Your subscription supports independent journalism. Subscribers get the following:1. A daily email newsletter of the top China-Africa news.2. Access to the China-Africa Experts Network3. Unlimited access to the CAP's exclusive analysis content on chinaafricaproject.comSubscribe today and get two-weeks free: www.chinaafricaproject.com/subscribe  
Last year the Nigerian government announced that it would no longer tolerate rampant illegal mining and would begin enforcement actions to crack down on the practice. To make sure that everyone knew how serious they were, the Federal Government set up special courts just to prosecute illegal mining cases and then the states deployed heavily armed patrols to go into remote areas to apprehend offenders.Dozens of Chinese nationals were arrested in a number of raids this spring, mostly in southwestern Osun state.In addition to curtailing illegal mining activities, the Federal Government is also going after Chinese companies that violate environmental regulations. Authorities took action against the Hongao Mining Company that ran a gold mine near the capital Abuja for polluting the local water table. Officials were tipped off to Hongao's misdeeds from an investigative report produced by Chinedu Asadu, a journalist at the Nigerian online news site The Cable. Chinedu joins Eric & Cobus to discuss the Hongao case and the government's broader efforts to rein in illegal Chinese gold mining.JOIN THE DISCUSSION:Facebook: www.facebook.com/ChinaAfricaProject Twitter: @eolander | @stadenesque | @chinedu_asaduSUPPORT THIS PODCAST. BECOME A SUBSCRIBER TO THE CHINA AFRICA PROJECT.Your subscription supports independent journalism. Subscribers get the following:1. A daily email newsletter of the top China-Africa news.2. Access to the China-Africa Experts Network3. Unlimited access to the CAP's exclusive analysis content on chinaafricaproject.comSubscribe today and get two-weeks free: www.chinaafricaproject.com/subscribe  
Chinese-owned Nigerian tech company OPay started 2020 with $170 million of cash bursting from its pockets but even that much money wasn't enough to save the company from the dramatic economic downturn brought on by the COVID-19 outbreak and new regulations in Lagos that effectively killed its ride-sharing business. Sensing there was no way to quickly revive the OPay's ailing logistics businesses (ride sharing, food delivery, etc...), the company's Beijing-based owner Zhou Yahui restructured the business by shutting down pretty much everything except its still profitable mobile payments unit OPay.Abubakar Idris, a Lagos-based journalist at the Nigerian tech news website TechCabal, has been following the dramatic events at OPay. He joins Eric & Cobus to share the backstory of what happened at one of Africa's once most-promising tech start-ups and also discusses his view on what's next for Huawei in Africa after the company was effectively banned from two of Europe's largest markets due to intense U.S. pressure.JOIN THE DISCUSSION:Facebook: www.facebook.com/ChinaAfricaProject Twitter: @eolander | @stadenesque | @IAtalkspaceSUPPORT THIS PODCAST. BECOME A SUBSCRIBER TO THE CHINA AFRICA PROJECT.Your subscription supports independent journalism. Subscribers get the following:1. A daily email newsletter of the top China-Africa news.2. Access to the China-Africa Experts Network3. Unlimited access to the CAP's exclusive analysis content on chinaafricaproject.comSubscribe today and get two-weeks free: www.chinaafricaproject.com/subscribe  
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Creator Details

Episode Count
488
Podcast Count
1
Total Airtime
1 week, 4 days
PCID
Podchaser Creator ID logo 210374