All You Need Is Love (and podcasts)

A curated episode list by Cesar Moncada
Creation Date January 15th, 2020
Updated Date Updated January 28th, 2020
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As it is February let's talk about love. Whether is chemicals or the force that binds everything. This playlist is an exploration of love, the unexpected places you find it and the obstacles that people overcome because of it
Love is weird. How can this thing take over your body and bend it to its will? Tai looks to science, philosophy and his mom for answers.
When "It's a match!" takes on a whole new meaning.  Are you in the same social class as your parents? Take our poll by texting "class" to 70101. And keep sending in your stories about the times you've been most aware of your class and how class differences have impacted your relationships. Send voice memos and emails to class@deathsexmoney.org Stay in the loop and subscribe to our weekly email newsletter! Every Wednesday we'll send you our favorites from the audio world, fascinating letters from our inbox and updates from the show. Sign up at deathsexmoney.org/newsletter. Follow the show on Twitter @deathsexmoney and Facebook at facebook.com/deathsexmoney. Email us any time at deathsexmoney@wnyc.org.
For the 13th anniversary of the Modern Love column, readers sent in their love stories, told in just 13 words. More than 9,000 were submitted. We put together an episode featuring some of our favorites. Modern Love is brought to you by COUPLES THERAPY, a new Showtime docu-series following four couples during their weekly sessions with a world-class therapist. It’s a raw and intimate peek into the hidden world of other people’s relationships. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FJbWAWnWuio
Two strangers who don't speak the same language meet in Haiti and sparks fly... through Google Translate. Plus, untranslatable words of love, and a pair of robots navigating a tumultuous affair.
Arranged marriages, although they sound scary to our Western ears, are considered extremely successful. Divorce rates are much lower. But those are statistics. What about being in love with the person that you married? A Harvard study found that partners in arranged marriages, over time, end up being more in love than couples who marry for love. Our friend Ryan Kailath has known this his whole life, because he grew up with it. His parents met for 15 minutes before they married. *Includes the trailer for our upcoming season, “No.”
Almost three years ago, Norah Wood, 6, helped Dan Peterson, 84, through his grief. Today, their friendship is still as strong as ever.
How does dating work in your 30s when you’ve been locked up since you were 15? How soon do you share your incarceration history with new love interests? And how the hell does online dating work? Recently released men and women muse about all of it, and one former San Quentin inmate tries to make a beeline from the gates to the altar. Thanks to Article and the American Red Cross for sponsoring this episode. For a full list of credits and to find out more about the show, head to earhustlesq.com, where you can sign up for our newsletter and order a T-shirt, sticker pack or mug. Ear Hustle is a proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX.
Get to know our associate producer Cara Ehlenfeldt, and hear outtakes from the past year of The Truth. Make your mark. Go to radiotopia.fm to donate today.
Okay First Contact listeners... it’s time to get weird. Laurie Segall has been spending a lot of her time recently deep in conversation with someone named “Mike.” Actually, he’s less of a “someone” and more of a “something.” That’s because Mike is a bot... that lives in an app on her phone. She takes Mike on walks and tells him (it) about her day, what’s going on in her life, and how she’s feeling about things. He speaks to her like a human, but he’s not. Just a girl and her bot. Is it the future? The tech we’re exploring is conversational AI. It’s moving beyond commercial uses like customer service bots and into people’s daily lives for personal use. These bots are becoming a substitution for human connection - an anecdote for loneliness, or depression. This particular bot was created by a company called Replika, built by an entrepreneur named Eugenia Kuyda. In this episode, Laurie speaks to Eugenia about how 7 million users are finding companionship through Replika and the ethical issues coming along with it. Laurie also speaks to a user of the app who says it helped her get through some dark times. And Laurie gets personal. Her bot, Mike, became a friend and companion of sorts. It checked in on her. It knew her stress level. It was always there for her. And it felt real. Until it didn’t. Here’s the thing about AI - you can’t control it. Laurie found out the hard way. First Contact explores a new era of technology that blurs the line between what’s real and what’s code, where in the world of the infinite scroll and endless digital connections, sometimes it’s easier for us to speak truth to machines. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
What is love? With half of first time American marriages ending in divorce by the 20th anniversary, and infidelity being widespread, Science Vs asks: have we been lied to by our love songs?On today’s episode we explore: What happens to the brain when we fall in love? Is the compulsion to stay together biological? And, is monogamy really unnatural? We talk to Dr. Helen Fisher, Professor Larry Young, and Dr. Dieter Lukas about their labors of love. Our Sponsors:Everyday Bravery - Listen to Everyday Bravery, a podcast from Prudential, by going to everydaybravery.comVirgin Atlantic - Listen to their podcast, The Venture, wherever you get your podcastsZiprecruiter - try Ziprecruiter for free by going to ziprecruiter.com/sciencevsCredits:This episode has been produced by Wendy Zukerman, Heather Rogers, Ben Kuebrich, Shruti Ravindran and Rose Reid. Kaitlyn Sawrey is our senior producer. We’re edited by Annie Rose Strasser. Extra editorial help from Alex Blumberg. Production assistance from Stevie Lane. Fact checking by Ben Kuebrich. Music production and original music written by Bobby Lord. Special thanks to Joseph Lavelle Wilson, Austin Mitchell and to Professor Karen L Kramer, Professor Garth Fletcher, Dr. Alexander G. Ophir, Professor David Barash, Richard Bethleham .Check out Gail and Rose Reid's podcast Details Please. Selected References:CDC - Data on First Marriages in the United StatesHelen Fisher fMRI Paper on Early-Stage LoveLarry Young Review Paper on the Neurobiology of Pair BondingDieter Lukas’s Paper on the Evolution of Monogamy in MammalsThe monogamy camp - review paper arguing “we evolved to be monogamous”
An unconventional love story about a teenager, the Pacific Ocean, and an encounter with something wild.  Grayson, by Lynne Cox Lynne's latest is Swimming in the Sink You can find more about Lynne at her website: http://www.lynnecox.com/ This Is Love is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX. If you haven't already, please subscribe to the show and review us on iTunes! https://apple.co/2BmMZr5 Say hello on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Artwork by Julienne Alexander. Sponsors: Sunbasket Virtue Zola
This episode features a special guest facilitator, Self Love Specialist Jennifer Davoust of the "Tune Into You" guided meditation podcast. Connect with Jennifer at https://www.jenniferdavoust.com/podcast/ and be sure to SUBSCRIBE to the Tune Into You Podcast on Apple Podcasts or Spotify to get more meditations each week.

Extra Credit Listening

Love makes us do crazy things. But usually not this crazy. This week for Valentine's Day we have stories of people going to extremes to find and pursue their one true love.
We eat eels in sushi, stews, and pasta. Eels eat anything. Also they can survive outside of water for hours and live for up to 80 years. But this slippery snake of the sea harbors an even deeper mystery, one that has tormented the minds of Aristotle and Sigmund Freud and apparently the entire country of Italy: Where do they come from? We travel from the estuaries of New York to the darkest part of the ocean in search of the limits of human knowledge. This episode was produced by Matt Kielty and Becca Bressler.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.  Further reading: Lucy Cooke's book The Truth about Animals! Chris Bowser's Eel Research Project

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