saas podcasts

A curated episode list by
Creation Date November 21st, 2019
Updated Date Updated May 7th, 2020
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  1. Martin Henk grew up in a small place in Estonia and ultimately became Co-founder and former CPO (Chief Product Officer) of a certain well known rocket-ship known as PipeDrive. He talks about the importance of product validation as early as possible, and about how entrepreneurs and product builder need to stay focused and clear and avoid distractions. In conversation with Stephen Cummins.
  2. Bridget Harris, Co-founder and CEO of YouCanBookMe interviewed by Stephen Cummins. Bridget talks hiring remote first people and when it comes to founders … she says they need to be alive, intentional, patient and prepared to land planes in the dark – over and over again.
  3. CEO & Co-founder of YouCanBook.me Bridget Harris chatting with Stephen Cummins. She chats about her history and colourful CV – from Covent Garden busker to film and television to a very successful career in politics to serial product creator with her husband and co-founder Keith, to bootstrapping YouCanBook.me - appointment scheduling SaaS
  4. Part 2 and concluding episode of Phil Chambers, CEO & Co-founder of employee engagement software leader Peakon chats with Stephen Cummins. We go much deeper into the value that Peakon actually introduces into the world – and how things like contextual learning targets can improve management teams more effectively and how comparatively high Peakon numbers can be used to attract employees to your company
  5. Phil Chambers, CEO & Co-founder of employee engagement software leader Peakon chats with Stephen Cummins. Founded in 2014, it’s raised $68M in investment. Employee numbers have gone from 80 to 230 in 24 months. Phil tells us his story leading up to this startup and how Peakon can detect whether your best staff are thinking of leaving up to 250 days in advance
  6. Harry really underlines the value of finding an amazing co-founder - his talented room-mate in college for 4 years, Tom O'Neil. He started his career in Google in product management and that was a very formative experience for him. Since this interview Harry’s company Periscope was acquired by SiSense and now he’s the General Manager and CMO there.
  7. E68: Mike Molinet, COO and Co-founder of Branch.io Mike is a former volunteer firefighter, a fan of building and failing fast, and now the co-founder of a hyper-growth B2B SaaS scaleup. He tells the story about how deep linking and mobile growth platform Branch evolved from a consumer app.
  8. In the WebSummit in Lisbon we interview, for the 2nd time, Nicolas Dessaigne, CEO & Co-founder of enterprise search platform Algolia. For Nicolas developers are the new heroes and they have a big influence on the buying decision for Algolia. The company is in the news having raised $110M after the interview we did. He was the 2nd person we’d ever interviewed. Check out episode 2 of 14 Minutes of SaaS if you’re interested in company culture.
  9. E63: Peter Reinhardt, CEO and Co-founder of Segment. Since this interview Peter Reinhardt, CEO and Co-founder of Segment, and his team have raised another 175M USD to bring total funding to to $284 million and a valuation of over 1.5B. He validated an idea he was trying to kill by publishing a link to a sign up page on Hacker News – pretending they’d built it. The response was massive and Segment built it’s 1st hugely successful product in just 5 days Peter talks about why building a business where the target customer is developers can to some degree sidestep the question of what company size range you chase after initially. He describes Segment as a customer data infrastructure company – he wants to help customers manage all of their data from different sources. He lets us know whether or not he’s interested in building a marketing automation app on top of that and gives his view on the rise of 100% remote teams. This episode is about how Peter helped lay the foundation for building of a unicorn, by trying to kill the idea before it was brought into existence. If you love classic early validation stories, tune into the next instalment of 14 Minutes of SaaS. He also talks about how selling to developers can bypass the old chestnut of whether you want to go after SMBs or the Enterprise first. TRANSCRIPT Peter Reinhardt The most important thing about a business in the early stages is finding product market fit. After product market fit it becomes go-to-market and distribution, but prior to product market fit nothing else matters. And I think it really requires actually a scepticism. And I think the failure mode for most companies prior to product market fit is that they drink their own kool-ade. They have a vision for the world - of how the world should be. And they build a product to try to make the world like that. But actually the world doesn’t give a shit.= Stephen Cummins Welcome to 14 minutes of SaaS, the show where you can listen to the stories and opinions of founders of the world's most remarkable SaaS ScaleUps. Since this interview Peter Reinhardt, CEO and Co-founder of Segment, and his team have raised another 175M USD to bring total funding to to $284 million and a valuation of over 1.5B. Peter talks about why building a business where the target customer is developers can to some degree sidestep the question of what company size range you chase after initially. He describes Segment as a customer data infrastructure company – he wants to help customers manage all of their data from different sources. He lets us know whether or not he’s interested in building a marketing automation app on top of that and gives his view on the rise of 100% remote teams. Ok – we’ve got Peter Reinhardt, CEO of Segment here at the WebSummit. Nice to meet you. Peter Reinhardt Thanks for having me. Nice to meet you as well. Stephen Cummins Tell me a little bit about your life up to Segment Peter Reinhardt Sure. I grew up in Seattle and was really into math. Then went to MIT and decided math was a little too abstract. Then studied physics. Decided physics was a little too abstract. Then studied aerospace engineering. I wasn’t going to get my aerospace engineering degree. But anyway I decided aerospace engineering was a little too abstract anyway. And ended up dropping out with my roommates and starting a company. So made the whole transition from math to business. For the last seven eight years have been working on a company that’s now doing reasonably well. Stephen Cummins What made you decide to found Segment? Peter Reinhardt So originally we … myself and my roommates in MIT … we were just interested in starting a company together. So we were roommates and best friends and just really wanted to spend more and more time together working on cool things. So we actually started as a classroom lecture tool. And the idea was to give students this button to push to say ‘I'm confused’ and the...
  10. Adi Azaria, Workiz CEO & Sisense Co-founder; Growth Hacking in Red Oceans. Stephen Cummins met Adi for a second time in the Web Summit and it was all change. He had navigated the difficult path of separation from a business intelligence rocketship SiSense, which he’d co-founded, to falling in love with the startup world again, and finding his latest passion in field service scheduling software Workiz. If you’re interested in hearing more about Adi’s formative years, tune into episode 8 of 14 Minutes of SaaS … although recorded early in the life of the podcast, it is one of the episodes that has had the highest listenership.
  11. This is the first episode of a 3 part series with Polina Montano, Co-founder of Job Today interviewed by Stephen Cummins. Previously interviewed way back in episode 3, this conversation is a deeper and more personal dive into who Polina is, the challenges she faced in Russia, her adventures abroad and ultimately how she became a major tech founder
  12. Episode 2 of 3 in the mini – series (episode 63 of 14 Minutes of SaaS) In Luxembourg by now - A multiple prize winning doyenne of Retail leaves her prized fashion store and works in an all conuming hard core retail position for Shell managing 6 petrol stations with accompanying mini-supermarket stores. Then leaves to do a masters in entrepreneurship and tech - and uses that as a springboard to apply her new knowledge and great idea to make the traditional world of hiring much more immediate, more local and much faster for companies and people looking for service and casual positions. Transcript Polina Montano I won Golden retailer - like being the best in the country twice. And after that I decided … ‘okay, what else I can do?’ So while I was still running my petrol station business, I just said well … let's just go and find something about learning about technology, because I was very much in the traditional sector of operations … of retail .. and going back to university was so good for me. It really like made a difference in making the world of technology accessible and exciting … really like opening my eyes on opportunities, on how much technology actually allows you to do nowadays. And already practically instantly I was excited about the possibility. How we can leverage such beautiful technology and innovation to improve the day to day lives of people and businesses maybe in traditional industries. And then the idea actually came along pretty fast. Stephen Cummins   Welcome to 14 minutes of SaaS, the show where you can listen to the stories and opinions of founders of the world's most remarkable SaaS ScaleUps. In this, the second part of a 3-part mini-series recorded with Polina Montano in the WebSummit in Lisbom, she tells us how she left a very successful career in traditional retail industries to become an almost overnight success in the tech world. The first notable one was V&J or the Stefanel boutique in Luxembourg? 1. What brought you to Luxembourg?  And 2. What was your interest in Luxemburg? Fashion? .. Polina Montano Oh, you make it sound so serious. I mean just for record …  Let's just remember I was like 24. I wasn’t thinking so deeply. I went to Luxembourg for the best reason ever …  I followed my husband who got relocated, for some work .. because he worked in finance .. and I just followed him to the country. I already knew I wanted to do something for myself. Franchising structures seemed like a great compromise  - you can still get the support of existing brands – the brand also gives you like a few procedures - kind of helps you set the business up - in the same time you experience a great degree of freedom in how exactly you run this location - and fashion obviously – young Russian girl 25 years old. I mean a fashion boutique was like a dream coming through … right? Like all of a sudden you have this beautiful shop – beautiful clothes. I mean what more could you possibly want? But guess what… it didn't last too long? Small Talk ends Stephen Cummins Yeah. It lasted less than four years? Polina Montano It lasted about two years - after two years of me running this shop, I got an offer from Shell - you know, the core company for gas stations etc back then - show or revisiting their retail management structures. And they decided to offer franchising as a formula and they decided that it would work very well for the group. And they actually at that moment offered me the opportunity - which once again took me way out of my comfort zone. Like I mentioned me being super happy with my little fashion store - like my little baby. It's like a lifestyle business. Starting all over again. Southern you actually go over the contract or finding a chain of selling points which essentially is much more than just selling gas. It's like having this little 24 hours supermarkets next to it. So it was quite an impressive structure - over more than 50 people staff - six locati...
  13. Polina Montano, Job Today Co-Founder – 3 of 3 – a Tech Star is Born A Tech Star is Born - Polina goes deeper into Job Today and discusses the changes that have occurred in the company and the reason why it can be a motor for economic growth by empowering companies to hire faster and better and to subsequently succeed better - as well as provide better opportunities for candidates. TRANSCRIPT We are the ones that are imposing these limits on ourselves. We have to believe in ourselves a bit more … like … just cut yourself some slack and give yourself some credit and say ‘why not?’ ‘why would I not be able to do that if I really… really want to? If I'm really really motivated. It's our own fears of not being good enough … of not being qualified … of not being able to do that. This is something which prevent us from doing things. Stephen Cummins   Welcome to 14 minutes of SaaS, the show where you can listen to the stories and opinions of founders of the world's most remarkable SaaS ScaleUps. This the final episode of our three part mini-series with Polina Montano - recorded in the Websummit in Lisbon. She goes into more depth on Job Today and the service they provide. She talks about it from the point of view of both the employer and the employee - and she's also touches upon the future of work issues around inclusivity and gender equality. Polina Montano Work is a vital need for most of us. And so, the impact on the economy is tremendous if we make hiring easier – something that might take the hassle out of hiring. We would like the beauty of the platform to be also how it enables new job creation - because as a small business owner if you know, it's going to be very difficult for you to bring someone onboard -  chances are you're just gonna put more pressure on your existing team. And by giving you a solution which is easy and intuitive and fast and inefficient to use … chances are they actually help you maybe hire more people and give opportunities to more candidates out there. Stephen Cummins Okay, now a couple of things I love about the philosophy behind the company is that, it allows for example, graduates, who don't have any references really in the workspace you know, to present themselves in a video format - so the employer gets an immediate impression about the individual. From the employer's point of view if they're not just putting bums on seats .. they actually can see the individual and think that my work actually ,…. that person could work in team … but I love the local! The fact that you focused on the local because that's the great irony .. people are down the road from you… you can't… you can't connect with them. Is there any vision to go a little step further where by you make the connection, you're the employee or the employer and whereby you somehow facilitate even the meeting place … is there any plan to build that out … where everything just gets seamless? Where Job Today even facilitates the meeting and everything. Is that too much? Polina Montano No it's definitely not too much! The whole idea is to make hiring simple. That's the core mission - just take the friction out of hiring. And absolutely - the scheduling of interviews and making sure it is a better fit and the best match between employer and candidate. It's definitely the direction in which I'm working – it makes perfect sense. As you know, the biggest hiring pain in service industry is no shows - we track which people apply for jobs with which vendor. They don't bother come for the interview. So clearly better communication and better processes can improve that. Stephen Cummins And if you were a candidate and you sign up for job today and you do two or three no shows, will that affect your ranking … because I know you're ranking the employers. Are you ranking the job seekers? Polina Montano Yes, absolutely. In the future yes – we are working on our ranking system right now – its all about bringi...
  14. Patrick Campbell, SaaS pricing guru and CEO & Founder of Profitwell talks – in conversation with Stephen Cummins for 14 Minutes of SaaS. Patrick opens up a lot about his own strengths and weaknesses as a founder CEO, but he puts his mitts up to the world too - saying that most big companies in the business analytics world paint pretty pictures with data, but have failed to evolve into companies that pro-actively surface solutions for customers.
  15. Episode 3 of a 3 part interview with Patrick Campbell, SaaS pricing guru and CEO & Founder of Profitwell, chatting with Stephen Cummins. reveals his ambition in 2 ways. Firstly he opines that the sort of work-life balance delivered to employees by the Basecamp guys is really tough if you want to build a very large company. Secondly he sees VC funding as a tool that he’ll use at some point in the future. #14MoS
  16. Canadian Mark Organ, founder of Influitive and Eloqua in conversation with Stephen Cummins for 14 Minutes of SaaS. Influitive helps companies strategically mobilise advocates within their community. The company has raised $60M USD in its 9 year existence. Before that he  was the founding CEO of Eloqua which was subsequently sold for $870M USD to Oracle. Part 1 of 3
  17. Influitive and Eloqua founder Mark Organ confesses to Stephen Cummins that he has an obsession with cashflow in the early stages of his startups – and explains why this obsession led to the founding of Influitive. We’ll also find out how many months it took him to learn to speak and understand Mandarin. And what app he used to help make that happen.
  18. Final episode of this 3 part mini-series with Mark Organ, Exec Chairman & Founder of Influitive (and original founder and former CEO of Eloqua). He tells Stephen Cummins that 'Best Place to Work' awards are a sham. He talks about Marshall McLuhan’s famous quote ‘The medium is the message.’ Today he feels the messenger is the message. Mark reflects on how Lego is the King of advocate marketing and is a prime example of how B2C is always years ahead of B2B
  19. Patrick Campbell, SaaS pricing guru and CEO & Founder of Profitwell, in conversation with Stephen Cummins for 14 Minutes of SaaS. When he got tired of working for the intelligence services in the US and learning stuff about the world he’d maybe rather not have found out – he left and eventually set up Profitwell - a SaaS business for other SaaS businesses who value understanding how to improve the financial metrics underpinning their subscription business. #14MoS
  20. Part 1 of 2. CEO & Founder Dr. David Darmanin chats to Stephen Cummins about his startup awakening at 4 o clock in the morning in Malta that led to the founding of Hotjar – software used by marketers, product managers and UX designers that helps you rapidly understand your customers
  21. Concluding half of a 2 part series. Hotjar CEO David Darmanin tells Stephen Cummins about his passion for building 100% distributed companies, the importance he places on self awareness and building on one’s strengths, and he mentions books that he mandates all new employees to read
  22. Cameron Adams, Co-founder & CPO of Canva, talks about his personal history and his decision to become a co-founder of this current rocket ship. Canva is a graphic design platform that has raised $157M dollars on a $2.5B valuation, but he says they're only 1% done!
  23. Cameron Adams – Co-founder & CPO of Canva, talks about product innovation and building teams that feel safe enough to express their creativity and take risks. He explains why it's almost impossible to AB test your way to a unicorn.
  24. Vaughan Fergusson, Founder and ex CEO of Vend, describes a no-frills upbringing, how he got into software, and gives a great example of the importance of timing in startups.
  25. Vaughan Fergusson, Founder and ex CEO of Vend, talks about people who influenced him and 10 years of amazing personal challenges which he initially used as therapy for his obsessive compulsive tendencies with in business
  26. Vaughan Fergusson, Founder and ex CEO of Vend, describes journey with the startup he founded - the first holistic cloud based retail platform. He feels the online experience will never kill bricks and mortar retail.
  27. Episode 4 of a 7 part series with Vaughan Fergusson. Episode 46 of 14 Minutes of SaaS. If Pam Fergusson had not borrowed money to buy her children a computer, would Vend and OMG tech exist today? Vaughan doesn't think so.
  28. Vaughan Fergusson, Founder and ex CEO of Vend, explains how a post Xero New Zealand is evolving away from tall poppy syndrome into a growing sense of confidence and a stronger personality in the world. He discusses the challenges of governments being slow to innovate.
  29. Vaughan Fergusson, Founder and ex CEO of Vend, talks about mentorship and why team and timing are more important than ideas. Also the power of diversity when it comes to hiring effectively and also regarding the creation of effective innovative ideas.
  30. Vaughan Fergusson, Founder and ex CEO of Vend, reveals whether he has lost the fear as an entrepreneur. He advises entrepreneurs to look after their health and take their time – overnight successes are uncommon in the startup world. It normally takes 10 years to build something really valuable.
  31. Episode 80 of 14 Minutes is the final one of a 5-part mini-series. Stephen Cummins chats with Sean Percival, CMO at Whereby, formerly of 500 Startups and Myspace. "I talked a little bit about why Myspace lost. We were not narrow. We were in every vertical you ever could be in. So, in the early stage, you have to be ruthless about doing one thing great and not many things kind of okay ... I think this is where a lot of founders struggle, because they're smart people … they have so many ideas"
  32. Episode 79 of 14 Minutes of SaaS is the fourth instalment of a 5-part mini-series. Stephen Cummins chats with Sean Percival, CMO at Whereby, formerly of 500 Startups and Myspace. "We're trying not to allow [Whereby] to become a large feature, bloated product, which is what happened to Skype, what happened to WebEx, and happening to so many these products. Zoom feels get might be going down that path .. I'm going to be a thorn in their side. And if they're not thinking about us, they will be soon"
  33. Episode 78 of 14 Minutes of SaaS is the third part of a 5-episode mini-series. Stephen Cummins chats with Sean Percival, CMO at Whereby, formerly of 500 Startups and Myspace. "Dave McClure is slight controversial in some cases, but still a really good guy. Dave invested in Wittlebee ... And he said to me ‘I'm going to invest 50K dollars ... I don't think this is gonna work out though. And if it doesn't work out and you need a job, I want you to contact me first, that's all I ask.’"
  34. Episode 77 of 14 Minutes of SaaS is the second instalment of a 5-part mini-series. Stephen Cummins chats with Sean Percival, CMO at Whereby, formerly of 500 Startups and Myspace. "That Wittlebee was a great business ... a year into it, we were making almost 3M dollars in annual revenue. Recurring revenue. And so it was going good, but the VCs were just like ‘Go! Go! Go!’ And I'm like, ‘Wait a minute. My inventory is breaking. My supply chain is not like ironed out. Like we're growing too fast.’ And they're like ‘Perfect. Keep doing that! And here's a little bit more money!’"
  35. Episode 76 of 14 Minutes is the first of a 5-part mini-series. Stephen Cummins chats with Sean Percival, CMO at Whereby, formerly of 500 Startups and Myspace. "Myspace was a cultural phenomenon. It was on the news every night. It was everyone's top. We were the first to kind of build the social graph - which everything is built on now. You know, Facebook, Linked, everything has a social graph. And we really started around that too. So, I mean it was everywhere. It was unavoidable .. Facebook were big data smart. And we were data dumb. We just didn't know really what was going on there. This is a big reason that Facebook won"
  36. Episode 72 – Part 1 of a 4-part mini-series with Jonathan Anguelov, co-founder and COO of Aircall in conversation with Stephen Cummins. Founded in Paris in 2014, it’s the only cloud phone system that has built integrations into 100 different SaaS applications in 2019. Its mission is to unlock the power of voice, specifically the power of telephone calls through integration the Intercoms, Salesforces, Zendesks, gong.io’s and freshdesks of today. It's valuation is already north of 250M USD
  37. E75 - Part 4 and concluding episode of a mini-series with Jonathan Anguelov, co-founder and COO of Aircall. In this final episode we find out about Jonathan’s beliefs regarding a lot of faster developing tech areas – and, more importantly, why they should be adopted and introduced into the business with caution. And - he has some amazing advice for anyone seeking to start a business.
  38. E74 - Part 3 of a 4-part mini-series with Jonathan Anguelov, co-founder and COO of Aircall. Jonathan doesn’t see VC rounds as reasons to celebrate, but he does see VC as a no-brainer if the ambition is both huge and urgent – and his vision is to build the future of telephony in less than 10 years. He reveals a love for open office working - and explains why he believes in ever-increasing employee specialisation and Sales Fordism as they take on the challenge of onboarding 10 new employees a week.
  39. E73 - Part 2 of a 4-part mini-series with Jonathan Anguelov, co-founder and COO of Aircall. In this episode Jonathan talks about growing up in Paris with an inspiring Mum who immigrated from Bulgaria and became a business person, giving Jonathan a front row seat into the ups and downs of being an entrepreneur. It didn’t put him off because he started his career as an entrepreneur while still in university, aged 20.
  40. Chris Wysopal, Co-founder & CTO of Veracode, talks about how startups take time and how some founders may look like an overnight success, but usually they've been at it for years. And how to be a successful founder, you need to love what you do.
  41. Chris Wysopal is Co-founder & CTO of Veracode, a data security SaaS company which sold for $950 million USD. He talks about his hacker mindset and the push Symantec gave him to leave and cofound his company
  42. Whurley discusses his night-time routine and advises founders not to control their teams and to respond rather than react to important events. In essence he advises founders that the need to control oneself is should be much more pressing than any misplaced desire to control one's team
  43. "For me the talent I work on the most is objectivity .. Data, not Drama .. which is my philosophy for how you should run a startup and run your life. So in my startups anyone can challenge any decision I’ve made, they can challenge anything, and they can challenge any authority – they only have to have data they’ve collected that they can show is objective that backs up why they think something is the wrong route for the company, why they think this is the wrong direction. And I think that would help people in their normal life too." Transcript (under construction) Whurley: Data, not Drama .. which is my philosophy for how you should run a startup and run your life. So in my startups anyone can challenge any decision I’ve made, they can challenge anything, and they can challenge any authority – they only have to have data they’ve collected that they can show is objective that backs up why they think something is the wrong route for the company, why they think this is the wrong direction. And I think that would help people in their normal life too." Stephen Cummins Welcome to 14 minutes of SaaS, the show where you can listen to the stories and opinions of founders of the world's most remarkable SaaS ScaleUps. In this episode - episode 7 of 8, Whurley describes 2 qualities that have underscored his success so far.  One of them is an uncanny knack for timing... the other is an ability to see the positive and the creative in those around him. He seeks to influence not control what they do. Whurley Now when i go to Japan, professor Mori who kinda invented annealing is there. It'll be harder to get the meetings but more relevant to what I'm doing. .... I'm enjoying the journey immensely. Under construction ... Timing is part luck, part opportunity. But if I had something I aspired to ... it would be a Carl Sagan, Neil deGrasse Tyson etc ... Did you bring your copy of Quantum Computing for babies with you? ... The talent is timeing and ...  
  44. Inc. Magazine is a Romance Novel for Business Nerds. “Romancing entrepreneurship is like romanticising people who fly 150,000 miles a year. When you’re successful, it’s all worth it. And when you’re in the middle and fighting those battles and you have those small wins, it’s super exhilarating. But it’s a form of gambling and you’re gambling with your career, and you’re gambling with your family, and you’re gambling with your life. And I don’t know that gambling should be romanticised ... I’ve never done a Series A. I’ve done 2 seed rounds. That’s the most funding I’ve done in my entire career. ….I“It becomes too much about raising money is seen as successful because with the money comes the power – I can hire people, I can acquire, I can do stuff. But the money is a poison because the money can also bring complacency." Transcript: WHURLEY Romancing entrepreneurship is like romanticising people who fly 150,000 miles a year. When you’re successful, it’s all worth it. And when you’re in the middle and fighting those battles and you have those small wins, it’s super exhilarating. But it’s a form of gambling and you’re gambling with your career, and you’re gambling with your family, and you’re gambling with your life. And I don’t know that gambling should be romanticised Stephen In episode six have a Whurley describes,how risky the life of an entrepreneur is - although he embraces risk, he believes we should go in with our eyes open. He makes the case for Austin as the greatest city in the world to start a business and talks about the advantages to being an Eisenhower fellow as he travels around Germany and Japan. WHURLEY You know, I was just that at this event, right before TOA… these guys like, you know, saying 'I raised 200,000,000 dollars in  blah blah blah blah'.  I asked what happened to the company? Oh, you know, eventually it folded this and that… to me that's even more horrible. I mean, I would never want to say ... I mean I've only raised for one company raised 3,000,000 dollars for Honest Dollar and that obviously worked out great. I've now raised 4,000,000 in a seed for Strangeworks. To be determined. But, you know, you raise the 3,000,000 for Honest Dollar. And I was the whole time ... was like ... we 3,000,000 dollars in debt. But if we do a series A ...  I've never done a series A. I don't want to go into debt ....  I've only raised 2 seed wounds - that's the most funding in my entire career. I believe, you know the  entrepreneurs credo ... to use it up, wear it out, make do, or do without. That should be, you know, the… the… the Bible, I think for entrepreneurs. Because it becomes too much about raising money and can create complacency in the company. I know how long 4,000,000 dollars will last - to the day ... and I will remind everybody in the company how many days we have left until we run out of this oxygen. That is this money in the startup. I want them to be painfully aware of that. ...... Inc magazine's a romance novel for business nerds ...  
  45. Expensive meme. will Quantum kill the Blockchain star? Killer blindspot. Do the best companies canabalise their own markets? Big VC: "Wanna buy a bottle of fear, uncertainty & doubt?" Little startup: "Yes please". Innovation exits stage early
  46. Whurley talks about the great challenge to finding one's purpose being almost infinite choice. Finding this is key to getting up in the morning filled with joy about the day ahead, charged with energy & desire to make whatever it is happen
  47. Our protagonist acquires wisdom & sheds his super-hero costume – he’ll create an interface between a swelling crowd of dev talent and tech that’ll utterly transform our future – in incomprehensible ways. A vision of an AWS for Quantum
  48. A whirlwind career as a serial-entrepreneur takes off as whurley loses the fear, gains financial independence, then goes through a psychological slump before re-emerging to invent retirement as a service.
  49. A car crash inspires the first step along a serpentine path to becoming an arch inventor, technologist & market strategist. Whurley accelerates the evolution of quantum computing with Strangeworks. He followed no rules in school. His pied piper is an imagination roaming far beyond the box.
  50. Mike Reiner talks about democratising AI, how he expanded City.ai from Berlin and Amsterdam into to dozens of cities globally, and how he assesses whether he wants to invest in a founding team
  51. Mike Reiner talks about democratising AI, how he expanded City.ai from Berlin and Amsterdam into to dozens of cities globally, and how he assesses whether he wants to invest in a founding team
  52. Final part of a 3-part mini-series with Ysiad Ferreiras, ex-COO of Hustle. Maslow's hierarchy of needs as framework for understanding others, profitable diversity, differentiating oneself
  53. Part 2 of a 3-part mini-series with Ysiad Ferreiras, ex-COO of Hustle. Deep dive into Hustle’s value prop, the magic of sales engineering, and why he’s wired to be a successful COO
  54. Part 1 of a 3-part mini-series with Ysiad Ferreiras, ex-COO of Hustle. He discusses his evolution from gang member to hedge fund trader to getting depressed in India to Silicon Valley exec
  55. Garry Tan, co-founder & managing partner of Initialized. Discovering what needs to be fixed in the world, why there's never too much capital, the power of great engineers as well as investments Patreon, Coinbase & Plate IQ. 2 of 2
  56. Garry Tan, who is co-founder and managing partner of Initialized. The Palantir blues, Big company blindness, there's never too much capital, the power of a great engineer as well as Algolia, EasyPost and Rainforest QA, 1 of 2
  57. Andrew Mullaney, ex Co-founder Newswhip - knowing what makes your co-founders & investors tick, navigating a sea of distractions, why a life bereft of holidays creates a soulless vacuum that sucks in bad decisions. Part 3 of 3
  58. Why does Andrew Mullaney, ex Co-founder Newswhip, describes himself as a virus? Why recessions are better than booms in a way, the one question Andrew will ask if he interviews you, and starting up in Dublin. Part 2 of 3