Foucault

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Creation Date December 9th, 2020
Updated Date Updated February 3rd, 2021
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Any podcasts or episodes unpacking the work of Foucault
  1. Michel Foucault was a French intellectual who rose to prominence in the heyday of democratic socialism in the 1970s. In this episode, I explore Foucault's endorsement of the Iranian Revolution among other things. I conclude by looking at what other writers have to say about Foucault's apparent endorsement of neoliberalism late in his life and how we can understand this endorsement. Running through this episode is the idea that a philosopher's thought is shaped but also distorted by the era in which they come to be. The final episode of a three part series.
  2. Michel Foucault was a French intellectual who rose to prominence in the heyday of democratic socialism in the 1970s. In this episode, I look at his unique definitions of power and knowledge and examine his use of those concepts to analyze and critique existing political structures. This analysis defines his singular contribution to philosophy and intellectual thought but also pushes his politics unintentionally rightward. Frankly, he gives fuel to those who would criticize the welfare state. This is episode 2 of a 3 part series on Foucault.
  3. Michel Foucault was a French intellectual who rose to prominence in the heyday of democratic socialism in the 1970s. Though he seemed to have leftist tendencies, he was also committed to being an iconoclastic thinker. This commitment to iconoclasm may have undermined the very politics that he seemed to support. Running through this episode is the idea that a philosopher's thought is shaped but also distorted by the era in which they come to be. Episode 1 of a 3 part series.
  4. Today we talk about the work of Michel Foucault.  Support the show on Patreon! www.philosophizethis.org for additional content. Thank you for wanting to know more today than you did yesterday. :)
  5. In this episode, I present Michel Foucault's theory of the Panopticon. Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/theoryandphilosophy paypal.me/theoryphilosophy IG: @theory_and_philosophy
  6. In this episode we are joined by Richard Pringle, Professor of Sport, Health and Physical Education at Monash University. Richard reflects on the challenge of transitioning from reading kinesiology to reading Michel Foucault, discusses how Foucault provided him with a lens to understand pain and gender on the rugby pitch, and offers advice on the […]
  7. How did Foucault become a public, political intellectual? In Foucault: The Birth of Power (Polity Press, 2017), Stuart Elden, Professor of Political Theory and Geography at the University of Warwick, follows up his book on Foucault’s …
  8. How did Foucault become a public, political intellectual? In Foucault: The Birth of Power (Polity Press, 2017), Stuart Elden, Professor of Political Theory and Geography at the University of Warwick, follows up his book on Foucault’s Last Decade with research on Foucault’s work from the late 1960s to the middle 1970s. As with Foucault’s work at the time, the book is focused on the emergence of a new understanding of power, alongside detailed engagements with archival materials and the recently published College De France lecture series. The book offers an alternative reading to traditional periodisations of Foucault’s work, suggesting engagements with ancient Greece, ‘repressive’ theories of power, and his public political work, can be rethought to add nuance and depth to current understandings of Foucault’s theories of the ‘productive’ nature of power and the practice of his scholarship. The book is part of Elden’s broader project on Foucault much of which is detailed on his Progressive Geographies blog. The rich and detailed text will be of interest to social theorists, Foucault scholars, and anyone interested in how best to understand the meaning of power. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/critical-theory
  9. @Plasticpills, Matt McManus, Erik, and Marion offer a rundown of what we consider the most important concepts of Foucault's thought and doubles as an introduction if you're rusty.    Check out www.patreon.com/plasticpills to support the Pill Pod and dose up on this and future episodes.    
  10. Discussing Michel Foucault's Discipline and Punish (1975), parts 1, 2 and section 3 of part 3. With guest Katie McIntyre.
  11. How did Foucault become a public, political intellectual? In Foucault: The Birth of Power (Polity Press, 2017), Stuart Elden, Professor of Political Theory and Geography at the University of Warwick, follows up his book on Foucault’s Last Decade with research on Foucault’s work from the late 1960s to the middle... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/politics-and-polemics
  12. Listen in to this week’s ‘Talking History’ as Patrick and his expert panel address the work of Michel Foucault and his philosophy of punishment
  13. We are chatting with Lynne Huffer about her most recent book, “Mad For Foucault.” It’s a delightful interview full of queer theory, Foucault (of course), and a discussion on form. One of our favorites.
  14. In this episode, we revisit the famous talk between Deleuze and Foucault entitled "Intellectuals and Power".  Our discussion of interview involves breaking down Deleuze's theory of theory and praxis and examining the development of Foucault's notion of power from this interview to his writing of Discipline and Punish. Also, Craig reflects upon his work as a prison educator vis-à-vis the concepts explored.Find us Patreon, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram!The text of "Intellectuals and Power" can be found on libcom.org.Reading: https://libcom.org/library/intellectuals-power-a-conversation-between-michel-foucault-and-gilles-deleuze
  15. How did Foucault become a public, political intellectual? In Foucault: The Birth of Power (Polity Press, 2017), Stuart Elden, Professor of Political Theory and Geography at the University of Warwick, follows up his book on Foucault’s …
  16. It's time crack open a Foucault one with the boys... Comrade Commissar Don and I dive into the first lecture of Foucault's Society Must Be Defended. Lots of juicy content in here about Foucault's method, his understanding of power, and more! Further Reading/References Thomas Kuhn's Structure of Scientific Revolutions Summary The Stanford Prison Experiment Carl von Clausewitz  ------------------------------------------------ Click here to subscribe to Red Library on iTunes  Click here to support Red Library on Patreon Click here to find Red Library on Facebook Click here to find the host's political theory blog, Capillaries: Theory at the Front
  17. Hello, Fully Automated friends! For your coronavirus lockdown listening pleasure, we are today releasing a really special episode. Our guest is Dr. Magnus Paulsen Hansen, who is an Associate Professor at the Department of Social Sciences and Business, at Roskilde University. Magnus researches the role of ideas and evaluation in the legitimation of welfare state transformations. But he is also a bit of a Foucault ninja. And he is joining us today to discuss a question that has vexed me for a long time: was Foucault a neoliberal? Veteran listeners may recall the last time we discussed this issue, when we had Mark GE Kelly on the show, all the way back in Episode 2! But I wanted to get Magnus on the show to go a little deeper into some of these arguments, as its a debate that doesn’t seem to be going away. In 2015, Magnus published an article in the journal Foucault Studies, entitled Foucault’s Flirt? Neoliberalism, the Left and the Welfare State; a Commentary on La dernière leçon de Michel Foucault and Critiquer Foucault. For me, it stands as one of the most exhaustively researched and argued rebuttals of the contention, by Daniel Zamora, and other fellow travelers (see also here), that Foucault bears some kind of intellectual responsibility for the rise of neoliberal thought. Honestly, I’ve always been a little alarmed by the argument that Foucault was a neoliberal. Its not so much the idea itself that offends me, as the slipshod nature of the way the argument is made. With a strong tendency towards ad hominem argumentation, and little consideration for Foucault’s core teachings on power, the argument appears to be quite ideologically driven. Often, it seems to boil down simply to the argument that Foucault was some sort of intellectual magpie, and all too easily distracted by shiny objects. Zamora and his fellow travelers claim that Foucault was “seduced” by the basic model of freedom offered by neoliberal thought, and that he was thus blinded to its more disciplinary tendencies. Given Foucault’s prestige and influence among the left, this was an abdication from his intellectual duty, weakening the left just at the moment of Reagan and Thatcher’s arrival. In this interview, we discuss the danger of looking for “hidden” or “unconscious” intentions in an author, and the idea that such intentions might relate to any conclusion about an author’s politics. We discuss the “best case” defense of the claim that Foucault was somehow seduced by neoliberal thought, and the way this argument often gets linked in an under-nuanced way to Foucault’s critique of the post-war welfare state. We also explore the various ways in which Foucault, while often categorized as a libertarian, with anti-state proclivities, was equally opposed to anarchist theoretics of the state, going even so far as to refer to them as a form of “state phobia” — something that is especially interesting think about today, in light of Agamben’s recent interventions on Coronavirus measures as amplifying permanent state of exception (I discussed this at length in the intro to our last episode, with Garnet Kindervater). In the face of such weak evidence, we should note that Foucault in no way accepted or endorsed the idea that he was himself a neoliberal. To the contrary, as Magnus notes, there is a strong cautionary voice in Foucault’s writings on neoliberalism. Indeed, he appears to argue that it foreshadows the dawn of a new and sinister mode of political power; at the moment of neoliberalism’s birth, Foucault was warning that neoliberal theory imagines itself installing a “permanent economic tribunal” and becoming a hegemonic “model of social relations and of existence itself.” Certainly, this is not to say Foucault’s work has no blind spots when it comes to the question of what neoliberal theory would later become. One common objection to Foucault in this sense is his failure to anticipate the disciplinary aspects of contemporary neolibera...
  18. In his 1977 essay, “Nietzsche, Genealogy, History”, Michel Foucault criticizes the traditional historical method and makes an argument for why a ‘genealogical’ approach is important. But what is genealogy? It’s a history of us. Of the attitudes and dispositions we embody today. The way we approach and do things. These things often seem like they don’t have a history, that they’re human nature. That they’re normal, eternal, unchangeable. Genealogy attempts to uncover how they’ve changed over time – how there are different ways of approaching them. It uncovers how they’re not the way they are because they’ve gradually improved; they’re not part of an inevitable linear progression through history. They’re contingent. Genealogy often examines attitudes, beliefs, presuppositions. – Morality, discipline, sexuality. It addresses a traditional history that assumes simple movement forward over time. It draws out, uncovers, and critically examines the origins of a specific conception of what’s morally good, or the source of a particular way of disciplining societal criminality, or the genesis of attitudes about what it means to be a feminine woman. Foucault is influenced by Nietzsche, the first person to show that morality – our ideas of what’s good and bad - has a history, has changed over time. He is searching for the 'origins' of the genealogical method in Nietzsche. Then & Now is FAN-FUNDED! Support me on Patreon and pledge as little as $1 per video: http://patreon.com/user?u=3517018
  19. In this episode, we are going to talk about Life of Michel Foucault and his writing. Looking specifically at how we can use the ways in which Foucault plays with discourse and power in education.  --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/transformative-talk/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/transformative-talk/support
  20. In this episode, I present what Michel Foucault means by biopolitics and biopower. If you want to support me, you can do that with these links: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/theoryandphilosophy paypal.me/theoryphilosophy IG: @theory_and_philosophy
  21. "[Foucault] has something to say to almost every field in the arts, humanities, and social sciences."
  22. Stuart Elden is Professor of Political Theory and Geography at University of Warwick. He is the author of multiple books on the work of Michel Foucault, alongside other texts on Georges Canguilhem, Kant and Heidegger. In this episode we discuss his soon to be published book The Early Foucault Early Foucault can be purchased here: https://politybooks.com/bookdetail/?isbn=9781509525959 Become part of the Hermitix community: Hermitix Twitter Hermitix Discord Support Hermitix: Subscribe Hermitix Patreon Hermitix Merchandise One off Donations at Ko-Fi Hermitix Twitter Bitcoin Donation Address: 3LAGEKBXEuE2pgc4oubExGTWtrKPuXDDLK Ethereum Donation Address: 0xfd2bbe86d6070004b9Cbf682aB2F25170046A996
  23. Michel Foucault was one of the leading thinkers that has lead to the postmodernist crisis that presentely grips The West. While he himself is not the direct cause of our issues at hand, he did open the door for them. 
  24. Our most recent podcast, "Foucault in the Real World: Disciplinary Power and the Construction of Human Agency," is our final episode of a Four Part Series. In our last episode, we examined what a Nietzschean and Foucaultian account of Language meant for their interpretation of Power and Human Agency. In this episode we illuminate what these ideas mean in and through an examination of Foucault's critique of the Enlightenment. What is disciplinary power? And why, according to Foucault, are we simultaneously prisoner in and guard over our own consciousness? Enjoy!
  25. In this episode, I present an introduction to the differences (and similarities) between Baudrillard and Foucault. I really want to stress that I only gloss over the issue here and may do a follow up in the future. If you want to support me: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/theoryandphilosophy paypal.me/theoryphilosophy IG: @theory_and_philosophy
  26. This week, we are kicking off a new series of mini-episodes on that bad boy of French philosophy and history, The Notorious Michel Foucault. Comrade Commissar Don joins me to begin tackling the lecture series Foucault gave in 1975 called Society Must Be Defended. Foucault uses these lectures to explore the relationship between power and social structures, war and society, and tons more! To help everyone get off to a good start, we have a brief discussion of Foucault's most important theoretical contributions and his relationship to Marxism and politics in general to set up diving into the lectures themselves.  Future Reading/References Michel Foucault's Political Thought Rick Roderick on Foucault's Philosophical and Political Theory  Louis Althusser Nicos Poulantzas Manifesto of the Prison Information Group from 1971 ------------------------------------------------ Click here to subscribe to Red Library on iTunes  Click here to support Red Library on Patreon Click here to find Red Library on Facebook Click here to find the host's political theory blog, Capillaries: Theory at the Front
  27. Michael Roth gives his lecture, Introducing Michel Foucault.
  28. We provide a summary and explanation of Michel Foucault's concept of governmentality. We focus on the difference between the art of government and the science of the state, as well as the importance of the term "economy."
  29. How can we untangle Madness & Civilization and think clearly about what Foucault is saying, both in the book, and by extension in later works? Looking at some criticisms of him are a good way to try to pin down exactly what’s going on with his method and view of the world, so let’s start there. In 1987 Lawrence Stone, for example, criticized Foucault as being ‘unconcerned with historical detail of time or place or with rigorous documentation.’ He said that Foucault ignored ‘enormous differences in the degree and organization of incarceration from country to country’ in Europe. How might Foucault respond to some of his critics? To understand it's important to look closely at his method, too. In short, his method is ‘to write the history of madness will therefore mean making a structural study of the historical ensemble – notions, institutions, judicial and police measures, scientific concepts.’ A Foucauldian method searches for the consistent and compatible conceptual frameworks that set the criteria for what a normal human nature is at any given time, and broadly suggest the attitudes, perceptions, and sensibilities any given society holds. These phenomena form epistemes that historically have changed over time. Then & Now is FAN-FUNDED! Support me on Patreon and pledge as little as $1 per video: http://patreon.com/user?u=3517018
  30. A few words on Foucault, French poststructuralist philosopher.  Hurricane Relief: https://www.youcaring.com/victimsofhurricaneharvey-915053 Sources: http://www.unisa.edu.au/Global/EASS/HRI/foucault_-_the_subject_and_power.pdf Book: Foucault "Power" edited by James Faubion
  31. In this introduction to Foucault I look at the poststructuralist philosopher’s influences and context (Nietzsche, Levi-Strauss & Sartre, among others), and summarise his position through his three most influential works, The Order of Things, Discipline and Punish, and The History of Sexuality. Foucault’s thought takes two approaches that are loosely related – the archaeological and the genealogical. The most important concept is that power and knowledge are intimately linked. For Foucault, different time periods – what he calls epistemes – have different underlying assumptions, codes, and rules, mostly unconscious or at least structural, about how to think about things in the world. Foucault analyses the way we're discipline by power in the same way. In her introduction to Discipline and Punish, Lisa Downing puts like this: Foucault analyses the ‘means by which the body is made to conform to the utilitarian ends of social regimes thanks to the operations of disciplinary power.’ Finally, the central question outlined in vol. 1 is that of the ‘repressive hypothesis'. The narrative dominant in the 70s argued that where Westerners were once sexually oppressed, we have become slowly more liberated, more liberal. Is it really that simple? Like the rest of his work, Foucault questions this progressive, teleological narrative.
  32. Is Michel Foucault still relevant in 2016? Has postmodernism become the “house style” of capitalism? In episode #019 Chris explores these questions and many others with Penn State University Professor Dr. Jeffrey Nealon, author of several books including Foucault Beyond Foucault: Power and Its Intensifications Since 1984 and Post-Postmodernism: Or, The Cultural Logic Of Just-In-Time Capitalism. Dr. Jeffrey Nealon Foucault Beyond Foucault: Power and Its Intensifications Since 1984 Post-Postmodernism: Or, The Cultural Logic of Just-In-Time Capitalism Plant Theory: Biopower & Vegetable Life Chris Hoff PhD(c), LMFT We want to hear from you! Website: http://www.theradicaltherapist.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheRadTherapist Instagram: https://instagram.com/theradicaltherapist/ Email: theradicaltherapist@gmail.com
  33. More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/foucault-and-power. Michel Foucault was a 20th century philosopher known for his work concerning power and knowledge. Foucault is often cited for his theory of knowledge and power, which are inextricably linked. But what exactly is Foucault's philosophy of power? Is it a universal theory intended to be applied in any context, or was Foucault simply responding to the specific power dynamics of his time? Josh and Ken take power from Gary Gutting from the University of Notre Dame, author of "Thinking the Impossible: French Philosophy Since 1960."
  34. Season 2 Episode 10 An introduction to the work of Michel Foucault Produced by: Rembrandt Winckler and Nathan Beason **This podcast is for educational purposes only**
  35. Intro to Foucault In Death Valley • Foucault in Death Valley: One • Foucault in Death Valley: Two
  36. Today we begin talking about the work of Michel Foucault.  Support the show on Patreon! www.philosophizethis.org for additional content. Thank you for wanting to know more today than you did yesterday. :)
  37. Today we talk about the work of Michel Foucault.  Support the show on Patreon! www.philosophizethis.org for additional content. Thank you for wanting to know more today than you did yesterday. :)

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