Growth Mindset Top 30 Podcast Episodes

A curated episode list by Scott Lingle
Creation Date February 24th, 2020
Updated Date Updated March 22nd, 2020
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My personal 80/20 list of most impactful podcasts for leadership learning and personal growth
This giant episode collects every interview we've done on “How to Get Rich.” It includes the tweetstorm, Q&A, and 10 minutes of unreleased material on finding time to invest in yourself—at the end. Transcript: https://nav.al/rich Seek Wealth, Not Money or Status 1:30 Make Abundance for the World 6:40 Free Markets Are Intrinsic to Humans 10:21 Making Money Isn’t About Luck 14:19 Make Luck Your Destiny 19:25 You Won’t Get Rich Renting Out Your Time 24:00 Live Below Your Means for Freedom 28:40 Give Society What It Doesn’t Know How to Get 31:01 The Internet Has Massively Broadened Career Possibilities 33:44 Play Long-term Games With Long-term People 38:23 Pick Partners With Intelligence, Energy and Integrity 44:24 Partner With Rational Optimists 49:09 Arm Yourself With Specific Knowledge 54:34 Specific Knowledge Is Highly Creative or Technical 1:00:53 Learn to Sell, Learn to Build 1:06:24 Read What You Love Until You Love to Read 1:10:59 The Foundations Are Math and Logic 1:12:00 There’s No Actual Skill Called “Business” 1:16:48 Embrace Accountability to Get Leverage 1:20:06 Take Accountability to Earn Equity 1:25:37 Labor and Capital Are Old Leverage 1:30:06 Product and Media are New Leverage 1:35:01 Product Leverage is Egalitarian 1:39:42 Pick a Business Model With Leverage 1:44:56 Example: From Laborer to Entrepreneur 1:50:51 Judgment Is the Decisive Skill 2:01:15 Set an Aspirational Hourly Rate 2:07:41 Work As Hard As You Can 2:11:26 Be Too Busy to “Do Coffee” 2:16:34 Keep Redefining What You Do 2:20:38 Escape Competition Through Authenticity 2:22:41 Play Stupid Games, Win Stupid Prizes 2:28:17 Eventually You Will Get What You Deserve 2:30:53 Reject Most Advice 2:35:00 A Calm Mind, a Fit Body, a House Full of Love 2:37:55 There Are No Get Rich Quick Schemes 2:42:02 Productize Yourself 2:46:42 Accountability Means Letting People Criticize You 2:48:55 We Should Eventually Be Working for Ourselves 2:55:33 Being Ethical Is Long-Term Greedy 2:56:58 Envy Can Be Useful, or It Can Eat You Alive 3:00:23 Principal-Agent Problem: Act Like an Owner 3:03:51 Kelly Criterion: Avoid Ruin 3:10:33 Schelling Point: Cooperating Without Communicating 3:12:03 Turn Short-Term Games Into Long-Term Games 3:13:55 Compounding Relationships Make Life Easier 3:16:36 Price Discrimination: Charge Some People More 3:19:04 Consumer Surplus: Getting More Than You Paid For 3:20:14 Net Present Value: What Future Income Is Worth Today 3:21:03 Externalities: Calculating the Hidden Costs of Products 3:22:05 Bonus Material: Finding Time to Invest in Yourself 3:23:47
After living as a monk in India and running a plastics company in Florida, Manoj Bhargava decided to launch something new: a one-shot energy drink in a bright, battery-shaped bottle. Today, 5-Hour ENERGY is one of the most recognizable energy drinks in the world.
David Goggins is a retired Navy SEAL and former USAF Tactical Air Control Party member who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. He is an ultramarathon runner, ultra-distance cyclist, triathlete and world record holder for the most pull-ups done in 24 hours.
The Butler Bulldogs have a habit of shocking college basketball fans by beating top teams with far more talent. How do they do it? Adam Grant joins the team to talk about why stars are overrated and role players are underrated -- and how humility can go hand in hand with confidence. Also featuring "Moneyball" author Michael Lewis and Brad Stevens, coach of the Boston Celtics. (Audio only)
Naval Ravikant is the CEO and co-founder of AngelList. He’s invested in more than 100 companies, including Uber, Twitter, Yammer, and many others. It’s difficult to nail down exactly what we discuss in our conversation because I had so many questions to ask him. Naval is an incredibly deep thinker who challenges the status quo on so many things. This is an interview you’ll want to listen to, think a bit, and then listen to again. Here are just a few of the many things we cover in this episode: What a “typical day” looks like (not the answer I expected, and not one you’ve likely heard before) How Naval developed his legendary reading habits and how he finds time to read no matter how busy life gets How the internet has impacted book reading (both good and bad) and how to make sure you’re getting the best information from the most reliable sources What popular habit advice Naval thinks is BS and why Naval’s habit stacking technique that helped him overcome a desire for alcohol and other potentially destructive habits How Naval’s core values give direction to his life and how those values developed over time Naval’s thoughts on the current education system and what we can do to facilitate better learning for our children Naval’s favorite mental models for making critical high-stakes decisions His brilliant two-factor calendar authentication concept to keep him focused on only the most important projects Naval’s definition for the meaning of life (buckle up for this one) His amazing response to the investor who wanted to be just like Steve Jobs And so, so much more. Just a heads up, this is the longest podcast I’ve ever done. While it felt like only thirty minutes, our conversation lasted over two hours! And although it is the longest, it’s also our most downloaded episode on the Knowledge Project, so make sure you have a pen and paper handy. There’s a lot of wisdom up for grabs here. Enjoy this amazing conversation. GO PREMIUM: Support the podcast, get ad-free episodes, transcripts, and so much more: https://fs.blog/knowledge-project-premium/  
"Fuck it... I'm just not going to play this traditionally anymore." - Chris Sacca Chris Sacca was recently the cover story of the "Midas Issue" of Forbes Magazine. The reason: He is a newly-minted billionaire and the proprietor of what will likely be the most successful venture capital fund in history: LOWERCASE I of LOWERCASE Capital. He's an early-stage investor in companies like Twitter, Uber, Instagram, Kickstarter, and many more. In this interview, we discuss unfair advantages, how Chris chooses founders and investments, stories of missed opportunities, the styles that differentiate Wall Street from Silicon Valley investors, and how keg parties can liberate law students from the tyranny of class (Chris completed law school without attending any classes). Enjoy! All show notes, links, and resources from this episode can be found at http://fourhourworkweek.com/podcast This podcast is brought to you by MeUndies. Have you ever wanted to be as powerful as a mullet-wearing ninja from the 1980's, or as sleek as a black panther in the Amazon? Of course you have, and that's where MeUndies comes in. I've spent the last 2-3 weeks wearing underwear from these guys 24/7, and they are the most comfortable and colorful underwear I've ever owned. Their materials are 2x softer than cotton, as evaluated using the Kawabata method. Check out MeUndies.com/Tim to see my current faves (some are awesomely ridiculous) and, while you're at it, don't miss lots of hot ladies wearing MeUndies. This podcast is also brought to you by 99Designs, the world’s largest marketplace of graphic designers. Did you know I used 99Designs to rapid prototype the cover for The 4-Hour Body? Here are some of the impressive results. Click this link and get a free $99 upgrade. Give it a test run.. Thanks for listening!***If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts/iTunes? It takes less than 60 seconds, and it really makes a difference in helping to convince hard-to-get guests. I also love reading the reviews!For show notes and past guests, please visit tim.blog/podcast.Sign up for Tim’s email newsletter (“5-Bullet Friday”) at tim.blog/friday.For transcripts of episodes, go to tim.blog/transcripts.Interested in sponsoring the podcast? Visit tim.blog/sponsor and fill out the form.Discover Tim’s books: tim.blog/books.Follow Tim:Twitter: twitter.com/tferriss Instagram: instagram.com/timferrissFacebook: facebook.com/timferriss YouTube: youtube.com/timferriss
If you want your company to truly scale, you first have to do things that don't scale. Handcraft the core experience. Get your hands dirty. Serve your customers one-by-one. And don't stop until you know exactly what they want. That's what Brian Chesky did. As CEO of Airbnb, Brian’s early work was more akin to a traveling salesman. He takes us back to his lean years – when he went door-to-door, meeting Airbnb hosts in person – and shares the imaginative route to crafting what he calls an "11-star experience.”
Erik and co-host Anuj Abrol (@nujabrol) interview Keith Rabois (@rabois), newly announced GP at Founders Fund. Keith starts out by talking about why he joined Founders Fund and the reason that the structure of VC means we don’t see more people moving from one fund to another. They talk about the future of venture and whether there will be more M&A in the space and where he sees things going in the next 10 years. Keith explains why being an effective VC is much more an art than a science.Erik asks about Keith’s goals at this point after all that he has already accomplished and why it’s thus far not been possible to scale one’s investing model beyond one’s self. Keith also has a well-known theory about breaking down businesses into equations and Erik asks whether one can do the same with careers as well. Keith recounts the story of working for Reid Hoffman and Peter Thiel at PayPal and how he has learned to trust his instincts in the absence of specific quantitative metrics. He talks about why being vertically integrated is important for a startup, why getting the timing right is part of a founder’s job (and can’t be a founder’s excuse for failure), and why in his view founder quality trumps all other factors when evaluating a business.He also talks about some of his requests for startups, including an integrated fitness and nutrition company. They also talk about some of the places where he agrees or disagrees with prominent thinkers in tech and how Keith’s politics and contrarianism have evolved.Quotable Lines From This Episode"You want to solve your biggest risks first. Mediocre founders solve the easiest risks first. Take the three most risky things and conquer them. I always counsel a founder to address risks in order of difficulty not in order of ease.""To me when a founder says they didn’t get the timing right, that means they just didn’t do their job.""I focus all on the people and a lot less on the market, a lot less on the product and a hell of a lot less on the technology." Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform. Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.
In part 1 of this 2 part series, Jocko Willink, retired Navy SEAL, discusses some of his most important lessons learned from his time commanding some of the world’s most expert special forces operators including the importance of understanding the objective and strategy (and then tactics) of a mission, why humility is the greatest trait a leader can have (and certain times when it’s not), as well as the necessity of having proper protocols in place to deal with whatever comes your way. We also talk about how Jocko prioritizes his military and family obligations with his love for jiu-jitsu, as well as how to decipher what really matters in life. Finally, we go through the US history with respect to various wars from World War I, all the way forward, and much much more.    We discuss: Objective, strategy, and tactics [6:00]; Training compared to actual combat [20:30]; The importance of humility in leadership, business, and life [33:00]; The dichotomy of human traits: Can you be too humble? [49:00]; Why many leaders lack humility [52:30]; Why Jocko wanted to be a Navy SEAL [55:00]; Jocko’s attitude toward death, and dealing with the death of a soldier [58:45]; The vital importance of protocols [1:03:45]; Protocol for losing a child (or anyone close to you) [1:15:00]; Protocol for getting dumped, and some relationship advice [1:18:00]; How to differentiate between things that matter and things that don’t [1:24:30]; Jocko shares his experience during BUD/S [1:35:45]; How Jocko prioritizes his family and SEALs obligations: Would Jocko come out of retirement and go back to war? [1:48:30]; America’s lost sense of connectedness and purpose since WWII [1:59:00]; How warfare has evolved over the decades since WWI [2:05:40]; Obeying orders and the obligation to dissent [2:09:00]; WWI and WWII, the beginnings of “decentralized command” [2:15:00]; The American warrior mentality, and the impact of freedom on a society [2:20:45]; What impact can an individual president really have? [2:25:00]; The Korean war [2:29:15]; Lessons learned from Vietnam [2:31:10]; First Gulf War, Iraq War, and The War in Afghanistan [2:35:45]; and More. Learn more at www.PeterAttiaMD.com Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram. In part 1 of this 2 part series, Jocko Willink, retired Navy SEAL, discusses some of his most important lessons learned from his time commanding some of the world’s most expert special forces operators including the importance of understanding the objective and strategy (and then tactics) of a mission, why humility is the greatest trait a leader can have (and certain times when it’s not), as well as the necessity of having proper protocols in place to deal with whatever comes your way. We also talk about how Jocko prioritizes his military and family obligations with his love for jiu-jitsu, as well as how to decipher what really matters in life. Finally, we go through the US history with respect to various wars from World War I, all the way forward, and much much more.
In this episode, Craig Groeschel sits down with negotiation expert and former FBI hostage negotiator Chris Voss (@vossnegotiation) for a 1-on-1 conversation about strategies you can use every day to work toward the best outcome for you and your team.
Your thoughts can hold you back, push you down, and feed you lies. But they can also lift you up! Is it time for you to change the way you’re thinking? Start with something simple—let’s find some Words to Live By.
Marc Andreessen (@pmarca) is a legendary figure in Silicon Valley -- and worldwide. Even in the epicenter of tech, it's hard to find a more fascinating icon. Marc co-created the highly influential Mosaic Internet browser, the first widely used graphical web browser. He also co-founded Netscape, which later sold to AOL for $4.2 billion. Then he co-founded Loudcloud, which sold as Opsware to Hewlett Packard for $1.6 billion. He's considered one of the founding fathers of the modern Internet, right alongside pioneers like Tim Berners-Lee, who launched the Uniform Resource Locator (URL), Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), and early HTML standards. This all makes him one of the few humans ever to create software categories used by more than a billion people. He's also one of the few who's established multiple billion-dollar companies. Marc is now co-founder and general partner of venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz, where he's quickly become one of the most influential and dominant tech investors in the world. In this interview, we dig into some fun things Marc has not discussed in many places, including: His epic debate vs. Peter Thiel Rules for investing The future of bitcoin Artificial intelligence Favorite books, documentaries, and movies And much, much more We had an extremely detailed and rich conversation, and I hope you enjoy it. Please do say hi to Marc -- he's very active on Twitter at @pmarca. Enjoy! Show notes and links for this episode can be found at www.fourhourworkweek.com/podcast. This podcast is brought to you by Audible. I have used Audible for years and I love audio books. I have two to recommend: The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman Vagabonding by Rolf Potts All you need to do to get your free 30-day Audible trial is go to Audible.com/Tim. Choose one of the above books, or choose between more than 180,000 audio programs. That could be a book, a newspaper, a magazine, or even a class. It's that easy. Go to Audible.com/Tim and get started today. Enjoy This podcast is also brought to you by 99Designs, the world's largest marketplace of graphic designers. I have used them for years to create some amazing designs. When your business needs a logo, website design, business card, or anything you can imagine, check out 99Designs. I used them to rapid prototype the cover for The 4-Hour Body, and I've also had them help with display advertising and illustrations. If you want a more personalized approach, I recommend their 1-on-1 service. You get original designs from designers around the world. The best part? You provide your feedback, and then you end up with a product that you're happy with or your money back. Click this link and get a free $99 upgrade. Give it a test run.***If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts/iTunes? It takes less than 60 seconds, and it really makes a difference in helping to convince hard-to-get guests. I also love reading the reviews!For show notes and past guests, please visit tim.blog/podcast.Sign up for Tim’s email newsletter (“5-Bullet Friday”) at tim.blog/friday.For transcripts of episodes, go to tim.blog/transcripts.Interested in sponsoring the podcast? Visit tim.blog/sponsor and fill out the form.Discover Tim’s books: tim.blog/books.Follow Tim:Twitter: twitter.com/tferriss Instagram: instagram.com/timferrissFacebook: facebook.com/timferriss YouTube: youtube.com/timferriss
Welcome to a special Episode of Tom Bilyeu AMA. Join us in welcoming Daniel DiPiazza's (@rich20something) MasterMind Group of entrepreneurs as they join us in the studio today! *NEW YOUTUBE CHANNEL* For those out there who are REALLY big fans of comics, movies, TV, video games and media check out our new channel here!!: http://bit.ly/2j2DhUa Buy Toms "EVERYTHING IS MY FAULT" shirt, as seen in this AMA, here: http://bit.ly/2ETVkoj ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- FOLLOW TOM BILYEU TWITTER: http://bit.ly/2iyjY5P INSTAGRAM: http://bit.ly/2j7vqX8 FACEBOOK: http://bit.ly/2hPStWo DOWNLOAD the 25 Bullet Impact Theory Belief System: http://bit.ly/2ubknRe SHOP: http://bit.ly/2rtRN8T FACEBOOK GROUP: http://bit.ly/2rg1AjM TOM BILYEU READING LIST: http://bit.ly/2rZdpO9 FOLLOW IMPACT THEORY TWITTER: http://bit.ly/2iC5lN3 INSTAGRAM: http://bit.ly/2hPSGJa FACEBOOK: http://bit.ly/2iystOf Subscribe to the PODCAST to get episodes early: http://apple.co/2icO5wz -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "How to Make Yourself Immune to Pain | David Goggins on Impact Theory" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=78I9dTB9vqM -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Guest host Tim Ferriss shares advice you'll want to etch into stone: The 10 Commandments of Startup Success. We teamed up with Tim's eponymous podcast, the Tim Ferriss Show, to bring you this special remix. You'll hear actionable lessons from every episode of Masters of Scale Season One, including previously unaired insights from Airbnb's Brian Chesky, Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, Endeavor's Linda Rottenberg, and more.
On this month’s podcast, Andy will begin a conversation about creating a culture of continual improvement.
Want to improve any idea? Find someone who disagrees with it. This is something legendary investor Ray Dalio knows. But there’s a difference between constructive and destructive conflict – and Dalio is a master at spotting the difference. In constructive conflict, a team has a shared goal, whether or not they have differing opinions. And this is the key to success. Cameo appearances: Steve Horgan (USA Field Hockey Director of Umpiring), Daniel Amen (psychiatrist, founder Amen Clinics).Ray's latest book, Principles for Success, is out now.Subscribe to the Masters of Scale newsletter: http://eepurl.com/dlirtX
HBO and The Ringer's Bill Simmons is joined by billionaire investor and ‘Shark Tank’ star Chris Sacca to discuss Google's profit ceiling (8:00), Twitter's lack of innovation (20:00), YouTube vs. Google Videos (28:00), the genesis of Uber (38:00), the e-sports revolution or lack thereof (46:00), Snapchat's success (1:01:00), Mark Cuban and 'Shark Tank' (1:11:00), and the future of live video at sporting events (1:16:00).
Listen Here: iTunes | Overcast Subscribe to my Monday Musings Newsletter to Keep Up with the Podcast My guest today is Daniel Gross, a partner at Y Combinator, the world’s best startup studio. Daniel focuses on artificial intelligence at Y Combinator and recently founded AI Grant, a distributed AI Research Lab.  Daniel was born in Jerusalem, Israel and was accepted into the Y Combinator Program in 2010. At the time, Daniel was the youngest founder ever accepted. In 2013, Cue was acquired by Apple. At 22, Daniel was leading several search and AI efforts across the company spanning iOS, OS X and Apple Watch.  In 2017, Daniel joined Y-Combinator as a Partner. He launched YC AI, Y-Combinator’s first vertical dedicated to investing in AI companies. In 2018, Daniel founded Pioneer. Pioneer is a search engine for the millions of “Lost Einstein’s” — extraordinarily creative people around the world who have the talent, but lack opportunity. Once identified, Pioneer and makes small investments to support whatever project they’re working on. In this episode, Daniel talks about the experience of coming to America and starting a company with Y Combinator. He talks about the power of seeing life like a video game with levels, and fast, continuous feedback. Daniel also shares lessons from John D. Rockefeller on business, decision making, and company building. Finally, Daniel talks about Israel and shares his insights on why the country is so innovative. Purchase the Transcript SUBSCRIBE TO MY “MONDAY MUSINGS” NEWSLETTER TO KEEP UP with THE PODCAST. Show Notes 5:40- Daniel talks about some of things he became fascinated with early on in life. 8:20 How Daniel took an early interest in coding through video games and reverse engineering. 8:50 The “gamifacation” strategy Daniel uses to set goals and motivate himself. 9:20 “Everything in life is some form of a video game”  Daniel explains how life can be similar to a video game in terms of seeing stages of life as levels, and setting goals and strategies to progress one from level to the next. 11:22 Daniel delves into what motivates people and specifically how our need for approval is not necessarily something to be ashamed of. 14:00 Daniel talks about YC’s earlier years and his first encounter with Steve Jobs. 16:00 Daniel describes his initial vision to create a “personal” search engine capable of sorting through your own personal data. 17:10 Daniel explains a variety of features and functions that AI and his coding have on iOS and OS devices  18:15 How will we interact with artificial intelligence in the future? 21:00 The pitfalls of trying to superimpose the current futuristic thinking rather than expecting the unexpected.  22:56 New tech often seems like a toy or novelty at first, up until it becomes mainstream.   23:27- Daniels offers his perspective on the bottlenecks we have on scientific progress and the current lack of diversity in terms of ideas.  26:00 Entry barriers most start ups have to face and overcome when entering AI development. 27:32 Daniel speaks about Assembly A.I., a start up that YC worked with. 29:30 Daniel explains the benefits of reevaluating a strategy when stuck on a challenging “level.” 34:45 David suggests the first steps to perusing progress is surrounding yourself with great people or ideas. 35:09 Reverse engineering your vision, into a plan. How to set “levels” as goals when playing the game of life.   37:39 How vital of a role our environment plays in our development and pursuit of  of progress. 38:15 Optimizing for a city versus a small group and the importance of one’s surroundings when pursuing a goal or idea. 39:38 Social/professional groups and their validity while shifting to a digital format. How strong are our online relationships when it comes to motivating us? 43:06 What makes Israel so different and innovative? 45:20 Daniel describes the first and second Intifada in Israel and the resulting send of community that was cultivated during the shared suffering.  47:46 “Scarcity creates greatness” How Israel innovates out of necessity rather than experimentally.  51:30 The “harsh” culture of Israel and its contribution to the deterrence of pursuing potentially good or risky ideas.  53:45 How optimism can be both a positive outlook for growth, but can also lead to false or unrealistic expectations   57:00 Daniel on how we can learn from history when looking at it from a cyclical point of view. 1:00.24 – How ‘stupid little ideas” can turn out to be some of the most innovative endeavors when pursued. 1:01.38 “Fitness as a ticket of admission to the world” and how it enables us to better experience more aspects of life. Purchase the Transcript SUBSCRIBE TO MY “MONDAY MUSINGS” NEWSLETTER TO KEEP UP WITH THE PODCAST.
Naval Ravikant is an entrepreneur and angel investor, a co-author of Venture Hacks, and a co-maintainer of AngelList. 
Published on 07 Mar 2017. My guest this week is Peter Attia, M.D., whose mission is to understand and improve human lifespan and healthspan (or quality of life).  Reading Peter’s research, you find that there are many similarities between health and investing—ideas like compounding—which we explore in detail. We spend a lot of time on mind, body, spirit and performance as it relates to living a better life. Of particular interest is the strategic problem that we face when studying longevity. As Peter puts it in our conversation: we are the species of interest, but we can’t conduct the kinds of experiments on humans—randomized trials, with control groups—that we apply to solve other big problems. So we have to back our way into a better understanding of longevity and quality of life. To that end, we discuss what we can learn from studying centenarians, the problem of progress in science, a drug called Rapamycin (which Peter believes could be revolutionary), eating, the importance of muscle mass, and the idea of distressed tolerance.  We emerge with a framework for thinking about health and well-being which can hopefully help us all live longer, better lives. Please enjoy!   For comprehensive show notes on this episode go to http://investorfieldguide.com/attia For more episodes go to InvestorFieldGuide.com/podcast.  Sign up for the book club, where you’ll get a full investor curriculum and then 3-4 suggestions every month at InvestorFieldGuide.com/bookclub Follow Patrick on twitter at @patrick_oshag
Dilbert creator and author Scott Adams shares cognitive tools and tricks we can use to think better, expand our perspective, and avoid slumping into “loserthink.” PREMIUM: Support the podcast, get ad-free episodes, transcripts, and so much more: https://fs.blog/knowledge-project-premium/  
“I’ve nearly been shot dead by the police – twice. I’ve been to court and handed a life sentence at 24 years old. I’ve been around some of the most dangerous men in the country, actual psychopaths… When I race, I feel tremendously honored that I can compete.”John McAvoyI can say without equivocation John McAvoy's story of metamorphosis is one of the most compelling, improbable, inspirational, and cinematic tales I have ever heard.Born into a notorious London crime family — think The Sopranos meets The Krays — John is a former high profile armed robber who bought his first gun at 16 and quickly became one of Britain's most successful career criminals and most-wanted men. But it took two spells in prison and a close friend's death amidst a heist gone awry to birth a desire to change — redemption he ultimately discovered through the transformative power of sport.Pulling one of the most improbable 180-degree life transformations of all time, John's greatest heist isn't a bank — it's his life.While serving a double life sentence on the Belmarsh high security wing — space he shared with extremist cleric Abu Hamza and the 7/7 bombers — John decided to take a spin on the prison gym's indoor rowing machine. That experience revealed a unmistakable fact — John's freakish natural aptitude for endurance matched only by an inhuman ability to suffer.The epiphany was miraculous. And it would change his life forever.In short shrift, John broke a cluster of British and World indoor rowing records while in prison. Upon parole, he began forging a new life as a professional endurance athlete. Today, John is the world's only Nike sponsored Ironman athlete, a stalwart mouthpiece for prison reform and a staunch advocate for the inherent power we all possess to course correct the trajectory of one's life, no matter how dire the circumstances.If John's story doesn't inspire you to be better, then you might want to check yourself for a heartbeat. In all honesty, I cant remember being so excited about sharing a podcast conversation. I sincerely hope the exchange inspires you to rethink your potential and the physical, mental and emotional limits you impose upon your inherent ability to live the life you desire.Peace + Plants,Listen, Watch & SubscribeApple Podcasts | YouTube | Soundcloud | Stitcher | GooglePodcastsThanks to this week’s sponsorsFully: From the popular Jarvis adjustable standing desks to their every-which-way active office chairs, to their many movement supporting accessories — anti-fatigue mats, treadmill desks and more — Fully is all about helping you bring more movement, energy and joy to your work and life. Get your body moving in your workspace, go to: www.fully.com/RICHROLLHarrys.com: A superior shave at an affordable price. Visit  For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy
Originally a professional musician and circus clown, Derek Sivers (@sivers) created CD Baby in 1998. It became the largest seller of independent music online, with $100 million in sales for 150,000 musicians. In 2008, Derek sold CD Baby for $22 million, giving the proceeds to a charitable trust for music education. He is a frequent speaker at the TED Conference, with more than 5 million views of his talks. Since 2011, he has published 34 books, including “Anything You Want” which shot to #1 on all of its Amazon categories. Show notes and links for this episode can be found at www.fourhourworkweek.com/podcast. This podcast is brought to you by MeUndies. Have you ever wanted to be as powerful as a mullet-wearing ninja from the 1980’s, or as sleek as a black panther in the Amazon? Of course you have, and that’s where MeUndies comes in. I’ve spent the last 2-3 weeks wearing underwear from these guys 24/7, and they are the most comfortable and colorful underwear I’ve ever owned. Their materials are 2x softer than cotton, as evaluated using the Kawabata method. Check out MeUndies.com/Tim to see my current faves (some are awesomely ridiculous) and, while you’re at it, don’t miss lots of hot ladies wearing MeUndies. This podcast is also brought to you by Wealthfront. Wealthfront is a massively disruptive (in a good way) set-it-and-forget-it investing service, led by technologists from places like Apple and world-famous investors. It has exploded in popularity in the last 2 years, and now has more than $2.5B under management. In fact, some of my good investor friends in Silicon Valley have millions of their own money in Wealthfront. Why? Because you can get services previously limited to the ultra-wealthy and only pay pennies on the dollar for them, and it’s all through smarter software instead of retail locations and bloated sales teams. Check out wealthfront.com/tim, take their risk assessment quiz, which only takes 2-5 minutes, and they’ll show you—for free–exactly the portfolio they’d put you in. If you want to just take their advice and do it yourself, you can. Or, as I would, you can set it and forget it. Well worth a few minutes: wealthfront.com/tim.***If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts/iTunes? It takes less than 60 seconds, and it really makes a difference in helping to convince hard-to-get guests. I also love reading the reviews!For show notes and past guests, please visit tim.blog/podcast.Sign up for Tim’s email newsletter (“5-Bullet Friday”) at tim.blog/friday.For transcripts of episodes, go to tim.blog/transcripts.Interested in sponsoring the podcast? Visit tim.blog/sponsor and fill out the form.Discover Tim’s books: tim.blog/books.Follow Tim:Twitter: twitter.com/tferriss Instagram: instagram.com/timferrissFacebook: facebook.com/timferriss YouTube: youtube.com/timferriss
Classic episode: You need a strong culture to build a company that will scale beyond the early days of start up. And strong company cultures only emerge when every employee feels they own the culture from day one. Here's how Reed Hastings did it – and made Netflix culture (and its “culture deck”) famous in the process. Cameo appearances: Jeff Weiner (LinkedIn), Aneel Bhusri (Workday), Margaret Heffernan (entrepreneur), Tristan Walker (Walker & Co.), Mariam Naficy (Minted).
Joe Gebbia (@jgebbia) is a designer, entrepreneur, and global explorer. He is the co-founder and CPO of Airbnb, which has changed the way the world travels and how people connect in more than 190 countries.In this wide-ranging and hilarious interview, Joe delivers the details on his path to Airbnb, and he shares the decisions, hardship, failures, and successes that prepared him for Airbnb.Enjoy!This episode is brought to you by Athletic Greens. I get asked all the time, “If you could only use one supplement, what would it be?” My answer is, inevitably, Athletic Greens. It is my all-in-one nutritional insurance. I recommended it in The 4-Hour Body and did not get paid to do so. As a listener of The Tim Ferriss Show, you’ll get 30 percent off your first order at AthleticGreens.com/Tim.This episode is also brought to you by LegalZoom. I’ve used this service for many of my businesses, as have quite a few of the icons on this podcast — such as Automattic CEO Matt Mullenweg of WordPress fame.LegalZoom is a reliable resource that more than a million people have already trusted for everything from setting up wills, proper trademark searches, forming LLCs, setting up non-profits, or finding simple cease-and-desist letter templates.LegalZoom is not a law firm, but it does have a network of independent attorneys available in most states who can give you advice on the best way to get started, provide contract reviews, and otherwise help you run your business with complete transparency and up-front pricing. Check out LegalZoom.com and enter promo code TIM at checkout today for special savings and see how the fine folks there can make life easier for you and your business.***If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts/iTunes? It takes less than 60 seconds, and it really makes a difference in helping to convince hard-to-get guests. I also love reading the reviews!For show notes and past guests, please visit tim.blog/podcast.Sign up for Tim’s email newsletter (“5-Bullet Friday”) at tim.blog/friday.For transcripts of episodes, go to tim.blog/transcripts.Interested in sponsoring the podcast? Please fill out the form at tim.blog/sponsor.Discover Tim’s books: tim.blog/books.Follow Tim:Twitter: twitter.com/tferriss Instagram: instagram.com/timferrissFacebook: facebook.com/timferriss YouTube: youtube.com/timferriss
The psychologist Angela Duckworth argues that a person's level of stick-to-itiveness is directly related to their level of success. No big surprise there. But grit, she says, isn't something you're born with -- it can be learned. Here's how.
Blake Mycoskie started and sold four businesses before age 30. But only in Argentina did he discover the idea he'd want to pursue long term. After seeing a shoe drive for children, he came up with TOMS — part shoe business, part philanthropy. PLUS in our postscript "How You Built That," how a long-haired Southern Californian, Chris Healy, co-founded The Longhairs and created special hair ties for guys.
Reid Hoffman (@reidhoffman) is often referred to as "The Oracle of Silicon Valley" by tech insiders, who look at his company-building and investing track record (Facebook, Airbnb, Flickr, etc.) with awe. Reid is Co-Founder and Executive Chairman of LinkedIn, which has more than 300 million users. He was previously Executive Vice President at PayPal, which was purchased by eBay for $1.5 billion. There, he was nicknamed "firefighter-in-chief" by CEO Peter Thiel. Noted venture capitalist David Sze says of Reid, "[he] is arguably the most successful angel investor in the past decade." They are now both partners at Greylock Partners. In this podcast, he is joined by Michael McCullough, MD, a close friend, co-founder of QuestBridge.org, and a successful investor with training as an ER physician. Michael is as an Assistant Clinical Professor at UCSF and previously served as the on-call ER physician to the Dalai Lama. Michael is also a Rhodes Scholar, Kaufman Fellow, and Ashoka Fellow. An avid meditator, he is particularly interested in investing in technologies and companies pertaining to the mind. We cover A LOT, including: Meeting Mark Zuckerberg for the first time and deciding to invest in Facebook "Fire-fighting" in startups and beyond Using board games to develop strategy Reid's view of what Uber has done well and what they could improve Some of Reid's suggested philosophers for entrepreneurs Non-technical founders and symbolic systems Going "off algorithm" in the ER to manage life-and-death decisions The 3 types of CEOs What Reid has learned from his network, including the founders of Airbnb, Kiva.org, etc. And, of course, we discuss QuestBridge, as Reid and I are both on the advisory board. All show notes, links, and resources from this episode can be found at http://fourhourworkweek.com/podcast This podcast is brought to you by MeUndies. Have you ever wanted to be as powerful as a mullet-wearing ninja from the 1980’s, or as sleek as a black panther in the Amazon? Of course you have, and that’s where MeUndies comes in. I’ve spent the last 2-3 weeks wearing underwear from these guys 24/7, and they are the most comfortable and colorful underwear I’ve ever owned. Their materials are 2x softer than cotton, as evaluated using the Kawabata method. Check out MeUndies.com/Tim to see my current faves (some are awesomely ridiculous) and, while you’re at it, don’t miss lots of hot ladies wearing MeUndies. This podcast is also brought to you by 99Designs, the world’s largest marketplace of graphic designers. Did you know I used 99Designs to rapid prototype the cover for The 4-Hour Body? Here are some of the impressive results. Click this link and get a free $99 upgrade. Give it a test run... Enjoy!***If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts/iTunes? It takes less than 60 seconds, and it really makes a difference in helping to convince hard-to-get guests. I also love reading the reviews!For show notes and past guests, please visit tim.blog/podcast.Sign up for Tim’s email newsletter (“5-Bullet Friday”) at tim.blog/friday.For transcripts of episodes, go to tim.blog/transcripts.Interested in sponsoring the podcast? Visit tim.blog/sponsor and fill out the form.Discover Tim’s books: tim.blog/books.Follow Tim:Twitter: twitter.com/tferriss Instagram: instagram.com/timferrissFacebook: facebook.com/timferriss YouTube: youtube.com/timferriss
This week’s conversation is about artificial intelligence and interplanetary travel. Its about content creation, thinking from first principles, and death progress units. Its about brain machine interfaces and why it is crucial that you be a chef and not a cook.  My guest is Tim Urban, along with his business partner Andrew Finn. Tim is the most entertaining writer I’ve come across in years, who explains complicated and interesting topics to his millions of dedicated readers on the website “Wait, But Why.” As an example, Tim’s last post on Elon Musk’s neurlink venture is 40,000 words long, roughly the length of a short book. It explains almost all of human progress and our potential future using drawings and cartoons. Its impossible to stop reading. While this conversation is wildly entertaining, it is also chock full of metaphors and lessons that will be useful to anyone doing creative work or building a company. I hope this leaves you as energized as it left me. I called this episode Grand Theft Life because that is the name that Tim and Andrew give to their worldview, which I think will change the way you behave, too. Please enjoy my conversation with Tim Urban.   For comprehensive show notes on this episode go to http://investorfieldguide.com/urban For more episodes go to InvestorFieldGuide.com/podcast. To get involved with Project Frontier, head to InvestorFieldGuide.com/frontier. Sign up for the book club, where you’ll get a full investor curriculum and then 3-4 suggestions every month at InvestorFieldGuide.com/bookclub. Follow Patrick on Twitter at @patrick_oshag   Books Referenced Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies   Links Referenced The Cook and the Chef: Musk’s Secret Sauce Wait But Why Neuralink and the Brain’s Magical Future Wait But Hi YouTube Channel  Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell   Show Notes 1:50 – (First question) –  Explaining his concept of planets 1, 2, 3 and 4 and understanding the human colossus 5:46 – Tim’s favorite idea of the human knowledge compounding 7:52 – Die Progress Units (DPU) 9:45 – Different stages of AI and the positives and negatives of each stage 14;04 – What happens when AI gains breadth and general intelligence 16:23 – The idea of a cook vs a chef and how Tim had the chance to interview Elon Musk 17:48 – Why you should reason from first principles instead of reasoning by analogies 25:19 – Why it’s possible to turn a cook into a chef 30:08 – Why being a chef is the safer route in a world with AI and what Tim has changed in himself as to why. 31:22 – Looking at the discovery process             34:39 – Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies\ 40:01 – Being the person who creates the metaphor vs being the people who simply using them             43:41 – YouTube Channel  Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell 44:54 – Most fun that Tim has had researching a topic 46:08 – Musk model for attaining your goals 53:43 – Why not caring what people think is one of the world’s best superpowers, grand theft life 56:50 – Neuralink – what is it and how did Tim come to research it 1:02:38 – Elon Musk’s concerns about AI 1:14:28 – What then if the Neuralink concept works out 1:18:02 – Kindest thing anyone has done for Tim   Learn More For more episodes go to InvestorFieldGuide.com/podcast.  Sign up for the book club, where you’ll get a full investor curriculum and then 3-4 suggestions every month at InvestorFieldGuide.com/bookclub Follow Patrick on twitter at @patrick_oshag
A chance encounter with a stranger gave Joe Gebbia an idea to help pay his rent. That idea turned into Airbnb — a company that now has more rooms than the biggest hotel chain in the world.

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