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Top Rated Biology Podcasts

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Victims or Saviours – Can Plants Protect Us Against Global Warming? - Video
Plants produce the oxygen we breathe and the food we eat. By assimilating carbon dioxide, they dampen the current rise in carbon dioxide concentration and thereby global warming. To predict future changes, it is important to investigate how plants are affected by elevated carbon dioxide concentrations and by increased temperatures. Can enhanced plant growth counteract global warming or will global warming lead to the extinction of plant species? Can we offset our carbon emissions by planting trees or is it better to invest in new technologies for the production of biofuels? These and similar questions will be addressed in the lecture.
Observatoire océanologique de Villefranche-sur-Mer
Ecole interne de l'Université Pierre et Marie Curie, placée également sous la tutelle du CNRS, l'Observatoire Océanologique de Villefranche-sur-Mer constitue un des principaux campus français en sciences de la mer. Il rassemble environ 180 personnes, chercheurs, ingénieurs, techniciens et doctorants.
Genomics, Identity and Health: Challenges and Opportunities for Interdisciplinary Discussion - Audio
New understanding of human genetic variation pose significant scientific, social, ethical challenges. The application of such knowledge to the treatment of disease and to perceptions of community and individuality is developing rapidly in a diverse range of institutional and cultural contexts. The public talks organised by the Anthropology Department at UCL aim to foster interdisciplinary communication across the social and life sciences that can address and examine a topical set of theoretical issues brought about by the changing field of genetic science. The event includes talks from Rayna Rapp, Sergio Pena, Victor Penchaszadeh.For further information please contact Sahra Gibbon s.gibbon@ucl.ac.uk
Lunch Hour Lectures - Spring 2008 - Video
Spring 2008 - UCL's Lunch Hour Lecture Series is an opportunity for anyone to sample the exceptional research work taking place at the university, in bite-size chunks. Speakers are drawn from across UCL and lectures frequently showcase new research and recent academic publications. Lunch Hour Lectures require no pre-booking, are free to attend and are open to anyone on a first-come, first-served basis.
How the Zebra Got Its stripes – Getting to the heart of Pattern Formation - Audio
To a chemist, one of the many intriguing features of biology is the exquisite ability of biological systems to control pattern formation – from the stripes on the side of a zebra to the feathers of birds – and the extraordinary silicate architectures of diatoms, biological systems display spectacular examples of structural control across a wide range of scales. To do this, organisms have harnessed chemical processes in a remarkable way. In this lecture, Dr Sella uses a number of chemical reactions to illustrate these ideas. If all goes well, we may even bring an inorganic system to life. No mention will be made of the periodic table and no chemical background is necessary. Lecture given on 29 November 2007.
Victims or Saviours – Can Plants Protect Us Against Global Warming? - Audio
Plants produce the oxygen we breathe and the food we eat. By assimilating carbon dioxide, they dampen the current rise in carbon dioxide concentration and thereby global warming. To predict future changes, it is important to investigate how plants are affected by elevated carbon dioxide concentrations and by increased temperatures. Can enhanced plant growth counteract global warming or will global warming lead to the extinction of plant species? Can we offset our carbon emissions by planting trees or is it better to invest in new technologies for the production of biofuels? These and similar questions will be addressed in the lecture.
The IGH Podcast
We interview researchers working at the Institute of Infection and Global Health in Liverpool to find out what they've been getting up to
Why Species are Fuzzy - Video
The ‘species concept’ – the definition of what constitutes a distinct species – has been a headache for biologists for at least 70 years. Recent genetic studies in natural populations have led to a revolution in the understanding of biodiversity and speciation. Species are demonstrably continuous with subspecies and varieties in nature, and intermediates in the speciation process are all around us. I will illustrate my talk with examples such as butterflies, birds and even whales. Lecture given on 30 November 2006.
Observatoire océanologique de Banyuls
Chaque jour, l'homme modifie son environnement et contribue à l'érosion de la biodiversité. Le bassin méditerranéen, particulièrement exposé, est un site d'observation important pour mieux comprendre les bouleversements de notre écosystème. A Banyuls-sur-mer, le laboratoire Arago est un lieu privilégié pour l'étude de la biologie marine et de l'océanographie en Languedoc-Roussillon.
Angels, Putti, Dragons and Fairies: A Biological Dissection - Audio
Representational art - painting, cartoon film, etc makes myths appear real; with mythological creatures and objects often placed within familiar and naturalistic scenes. One of the myths is that of flying beings. Angels, putti, fairies and dragons are all shown as having wings and an otherwise naturalistic form that we recognise readily. Yet, are they able to fly? If not, why do we wish to suggest they have the same powers of flight as real flying animals?
Genomics, Identity and Health: Challenges and Opportunities for Interdisciplinary Discussion - Video
New understanding of human genetic variation pose significant scientific, social, ethical challenges. The application of such knowledge to the treatment of disease and to perceptions of community and individuality is developing rapidly in a diverse range of institutional and cultural contexts. The public talks organised by the Anthropology Department at UCL aim to foster interdisciplinary communication across the social and life sciences that can address and examine a topical set of theoretical issues brought about by the changing field of genetic science. The event includes talks from Rayna Rapp, Sergio Pena, Victor Penchaszadeh.For further information please contact Sahra Gibbon s.gibbon@ucl.ac.uk
Inside Nature - Audio
A candid look at what goes on inside the world's most prestigious scientific journal. Dr. Henry Gee joined Nature in 1987 as a news reporter on a three month contract. Twenty-four years later, he's still there, and is now a senior member of the editorial team. The author of several books including Jacob's Ladder: The History of the Human Genome and The Science of Middle-earth, Dr Gee is one of the most influential people in world of science publishing.
How the Zebra Got Its stripes – Getting to the heart of Pattern Formation - Video
To a chemist, one of the many intriguing features of biology is the exquisite ability of biological systems to control pattern formation – from the stripes on the side of a zebra to the feathers of birds – and the extraordinary silicate architectures of diatoms, biological systems display spectacular examples of structural control across a wide range of scales. To do this, organisms have harnessed chemical processes in a remarkable way. In this lecture, Dr Sella uses a number of chemical reactions to illustrate these ideas. If all goes well, we may even bring an inorganic system to life. No mention will be made of the periodic table and no chemical background is necessary. Lecture given on 29 November 2007.
What Darwin got wrong - Audio
The 4th Memorial A. R. Jonckheere lecture at University College London, May 2009
What Darwin got wrong - Video
The 4th Memorial A. R. Jonckheere lecture at University College London, May 2009
Les gestes de la science - Complément Web
Série de vidéos en version originale française sur l'utilisation et la manipulation des instruments d'usage courant dans les laboratoires de chimie et de biologie. Aussi disponibles sur le site web Les gestes de la science.
Podcasts from the Press
CSHL Press publishes monographs, technical manuals, handbooks, review volumes, conference proceedings, scholarly journals and videotapes. These examine important topics in molecular biology, genetics, development, virology, neurobiology, immunology and cancer biology. Manuscripts for books and for journal publication are invited from scientists world wide.
Angels, Putti, Dragons and Fairies: A Biological Dissection - Video
Representational art - painting, cartoon film, etc makes myths appear real; with mythological creatures and objects often placed within familiar and naturalistic scenes. One of the myths is that of flying beings. Angels, putti, fairies and dragons are all shown as having wings and an otherwise naturalistic form that we recognise readily. Yet, are they able to fly? If not, why do we wish to suggest they have the same powers of flight as real flying animals?
Inside Nature - Video
A candid look at what goes on inside the world's most prestigious scientific journal. Dr. Henry Gee joined Nature in 1987 as a news reporter on a three month contract. Twenty-four years later, he's still there, and is now a senior member of the editorial team. The author of several books including Jacob's Ladder: The History of the Human Genome and The Science of Middle-earth, Dr Gee is one of the most influential people in world of science publishing.
Lunch Hour Lectures - Spring 2008 - Audio
Spring 2008 - UCL's Lunch Hour Lecture Series is an opportunity for anyone to sample the exceptional research work taking place at the university, in bite-size chunks. Speakers are drawn from across UCL and lectures frequently showcase new research and recent academic publications. Lunch Hour Lectures require no pre-booking, are free to attend and are open to anyone on a first-come, first-served basis.
the bioinformatics chat
A podcast about computational biology, bioinformatics, and next generation sequencing.
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